National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Summary
Page 4
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Innovative Practices for Transit Planning at Small to Mid-Sized Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26204.
×
Page 4
Page 5
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 1 - Introduction." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Innovative Practices for Transit Planning at Small to Mid-Sized Agencies. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26204.
×
Page 5

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

4 C H A P T E R 1 This chapter provides information about the purpose of the synthesis effort, issues to be addressed by the research, scope of the research (e.g., what is and is not included), and research method. This chapter also provides relevant definitions and explains the report’s organization (e.g., why the research findings are organized around transit planning challenge themes). Objectives and Scope The purpose of TCRP Synthesis SH-20 research is to document innovative practices for solving transit planning challenges faced by small and mid-sized transit agencies. These cur- rently include, but are not limited to: concerns about ridership trends, land-use changes and demographic shifts; first-mile/last-mile (FMLM) connections; changes in relevant regulations; approaches to service design; funding challenges; and leveraging technology to manage and/or improve service delivery. These challenges apply to fixed-route, flex-route, and demand-responsive transit services. Objectives of the research are to: • Conduct surveys and case examples about innovative or unique approaches to addressing planning challenges of relevance to small and mid-sized transit agencies in the United States. • Document costs, benefits, and lessons learned at agencies that implemented innovative or unique approaches to solving planning challenges. Although the synthesis effort focuses on transit planning challenges faced by small and mid- sized agencies, research results also may be relevant to large transit agencies. This is because the service area of a large transit agency may include subareas comparable to those of a small or mid-sized agency. Likewise, results of the synthesis research may apply to state DOTs, regional planning groups—such as metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) and councils of gov- ernment (COGs)—and local governments that play a role in funding, planning, or otherwise supporting transit service. Definition of Key Terms For this synthesis research, a “transit agency” is the operator or provider of transit service. A “small” transit agency provides fewer than 4 million annual passenger trips across all modes. A “mid-sized” transit agency provides 4 million to 10 million annual passenger trips across all modes. Introduction

Introduction 5   Technical Approach The team conducted the synthesis research by • Reviewing previous research to identify key transit planning challenges faced by small and mid-sized transit agencies. • Surveying small and mid-sized transit agencies to confirm key transit planning challenges they face. • Conducting case examples to obtain detailed information about: – Innovative approaches that small and mid-sized agencies (as well as large agencies serving lower-density communities) have used to address key transit planning challenges. – The impacts of those approaches on staffing, funding, data needs, and service delivery. • Identifying and organizing relevant lessons learned, challenges, and opportunities. • Identifying and organizing relevant future research needs. Accordingly, the conduct of the synthesis research included a focused literature review, survey of small and mid-sized transit agencies, case examples of transit agencies that have successfully addressed their transit planning challenges using innovative or unique approaches, and devel- opment of a report. Report Organization This synthesis report begins with a summary of the research results and this introductory chapter. The second chapter provides background information about transit planning chal- lenges and previous research. The third chapter describes the method for and results of the transit agency survey conducted to focus the synthesis’ case examples. The method for the case examples is presented in Chapter 4, and results are provided in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 summa- rizes the conclusions of the synthesis effort and discusses future research needs. Following a list of references and acronyms used in this report, appendices contain a copy of the transit agency survey questionnaire, lists of survey respondents and selected survey responses, supplemental background information for some case example agencies, and a list of selected federal funding resources.

Next: Chapter 2 - Background »
Innovative Practices for Transit Planning at Small to Mid-Sized Agencies Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Diverse small and mid-sized transit agencies are very interested in finding solutions for their transit planning challenges. They will benefit from seeing how similar agencies deal with their transit service issues. Large transit agencies could also apply what is learned to sub-areas in their transit service area that are comparable to the service area of a small or mid-sized transit agency.

The TRB Transit Cooperative Research Program's TCRP Synthesis 154: Innovative Practices for Transit Planning at Small to Mid-Sized Agencies documents innovative practices for solving transit planning challenges faced by small and mid-sized transit agencies. These challenges include but are not limited to concerns about ridership, demographic shifts, first- and last-mile transportation, changes in land use, changes in regulations, service design, funding challenges, service delivery, and technology changes. These challenges are applicable to fixed-route, flex-route, and demand-responsive transit services.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!