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Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines (2022)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

« Previous: Appendix A: Review of Previous Recommendations for Pandemic Vaccine Manufacturing
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
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Page 223
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
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Page 224
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
×
Page 225
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
×
Page 226
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
×
Page 227
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
×
Page 228
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
×
Page 229
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2022. Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26285.
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Page 230

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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Ravi Anupindi, Ph.D. (Chair), is the Colonel William G. and Ann C. Svetlich Professor of Operations Research and Management at the Ste- phen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. His main research areas include technology and business innovation, global sup- ply chain management, health care delivery in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), economic development, and environmental and social sustainability. His prior global health work on malaria and tuberculosis has focused on distribution costing models, models of effective resource alloca- tions, and patient-centric service delivery models. Recently he completed a policy brief with recommendations for scaling COVID-19 testing in the United States. He presently serves as a faculty expert on a task force to look into health care supply chains and national security issues. Dr. Anupindi is also the co-chair of the annual Global Health Supply Chain Summit that brings together academics, country planners, nongovernmental organiza- tions, practitioners, private sector, various multi-lateral and donor agencies to discuss the issues, progress, (new) developments in global health supply chains, and delivery. Dr. Anupindi teaches classes in global supply chain management, innovations in global health delivery, and sustainable opera- tions and supply chain management. He is the co-author of a textbook, Managing Business Process Flows (3rd Edition), Prentice Hall, 2011. He has also authored several case studies in sustainability, health care delivery in LMICs, and supply chain risk management. Under a U.S. Agency for International Development grant, he has assisted the University of Johan- 223

224 GLOBALLY RESILIENT SUPPLY CHAINS nesburg, South Africa, in developing a graduate degree program in Supply Chain Management. Dr. Anupindi’s academic credentials include an M.S. (1989) and a Ph.D. (1993) from Carnegie Mellon University (USA), M.E. (1984) from the Indian Institute of Science (India), and a B.E.-Hons (1982) from the Birla Institute of Technology and Science (India). Prashant Yadav, Ph.D., M.B.A. (Vice Chair), is a globally recognized scholar in the area of health care supply chains. He is senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, affiliate professor at INSEAD, and lecturer at Harvard Medical School. He is the author of many peer-reviewed scientific publica- tions, and his work has also been featured in prominent print and broadcast media. In addition to his roles in academia and think tanks, Dr. Prashant serves on the boards of many health and development focused companies. In his previous roles, he worked as strategy leader-supply chain at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; vice president of health care at the William Davidson Institute and faculty at the Ross School of Business at the Univer- sity of Michigan; professor of supply chain management at the Zaragoza International Logistics Program; and research affiliate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Transportation and Logistics. He trained as a chemical engineer and obtained his Ph.D. in management science and operations. Mahshid Abir, M.D., M.S., is a senior physician policy researcher at the RAND Corporation and associate professor in the Department of Emer- gency Medicine at the University of Michigan (U-M). She is the founder and director of the Acute Care Research Unit at U-M. Her research focus is in areas pertinent to improving health care systems, acute care delivery, and outcomes along the continuum of care—in pre-hospital, emergency department, inpatient, and ambulatory care settings during routine and catastrophic circumstances. She is the principal investigator on multiple completed and ongoing projects with a diverse funding portfolio (including state, federal, and foundation contracts and grants), evaluating solutions for improved care delivery at the health care system-community interface. These projects use mixed quantitative-qualitative, stakeholder/community participatory, and systems-based health services research methods. Dr. Abir has been a core part of RAND policy research teams to inform the U.S. National Health Security Strategy in developing tools to measure hospital and healthcare coalition surge capacity. More recently, she led a RAND- funded project assessing the evidence-base for critical care surge capacity in the United States in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. She also led a RAND project funded by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation assessing national and international COVID-19 related out- come measures. Furthermore, she was the 2017–2019 National Academy

APPENDIX B 225 of Medicine American Board of Emergency Medicine fellow and contrib- uted to the National Acadamies report on Evidence-based Practice for Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response in that capacity. She currently serves on the ASPR-funded, congressionally mandated National Academies Committee on the Security of the U.S. Medical Supply Chain. Rick A. Bright, Ph.D., is an international expert in vaccine, therapeutic, and diagnostic development. He is currently the senior vice-president for pandemic prevention and response at The Rockefeller Foundation. Prior to his current role, Dr. Bright served as a member of the Biden administration COVID-19 Advisory Board, providing guidance on pandemic response, in- cluding testing, vaccines, therapeutics, and supply chain priorities. He also served as the deputy assistant secretary for preparedness and response and the director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Au- thority (BARDA), a component of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. At BARDA, he oversaw innovation, development, and procure- ment of medical countermeasures against an array of threats to national security and public health, including chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear threats, pandemic influenza, and emerging infectious diseases. Dr. Bright has extensive experience in the biotechnology industry in senior leadership and executive management roles. He has also held scientific leadership roles in international nongovernmental organizations where he championed innovative vaccine development and vaccine production capacity expansion in developing countries. Dr. Bright received a Ph.D. in immunology and molecular pathogenesis from Emory University (2002) and a B.S. magna cum laude in biology and physical sciences from Auburn University at Montgomery (1997). William G. Burel is currently president of Hamilton Grace LLC. He retired from government service in January 2020 after almost 38 years, the last 13 as director of the Strategic National Stockpile. Mr. Burel is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, winner of the Service to America Medal in 2016, and a Franz Edelman Laureate. He is an expert in medical logistics and supply chains. Matthew Downham, Ph.D., studied a B.S. (with honors) in industrial biol- ogy at London South Bank Polytechnic (UK), which included a placement with Boehringer Mannheim (DE). He then completed a Ph.D. in biochem- ical engineering (Birmingham University, UK), a postdoctoral research fellowship in biomolecular sciences (Liverpool John Moores University, UK), and a post-graduate certificate in further/higher education (Bolton Institute, UK). He joined the biopharmaceutical industry in 1997 and has

226 GLOBALLY RESILIENT SUPPLY CHAINS worked for Protherics (UK), Bavarian Nordic & Morphosys (DE), Novar- tis Vaccines & Diagnostics (IT), and AstraZeneca (UK). Throughout Dr. Downham worked on preclinical and early clinical development of vac- cine, antibody, or enzyme therapies for infectious, hypertension, inflamma- tory and oncology indications. He was a European Registered Toxicologist (2010–18); chair, Vaccines Europe Influenza working group (2017–20); treasurer, International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations Influenza Vaccine Supply task force (2017–20); vice chair, IFPMA Convention on Biological Diversity working group (2018–20). Dr. Downham has co-authored 29 publications/abstracts and 3 international patents and, in January 2021, joined the Coalition for Epidemic Prepared- ness Innovations (UK) as the Sustainable Manufacturing Lead. Nagwa Hasanin, Ph.D., currently serves as senior advisor, health for UNICEF’s supply division, where she links programmatic and supply pre- paredness efforts for a range of disease-epidemiological scenarios and emer- gencies so that UNICEF is best positioned to respond to emerging health threats with existing supply tools as well as state-of-the-art product innova- tions by supporting research and development efforts. Dr. Hasanin is an im- munologist and molecular biologist science graduate from Cairo University. Her specialization and Ph.D. was awarded in 1994 from Cairo University in Egypt in collaboration with State University in Buffalo, New York, and the USAID Schistosomiasis Research Project in Cairo. She also held a postdoctoral fellowship in cancer immunology at Henri Mondor University hospital in Paris from 1996 to 1999 and worked in diverse settings (minis- try of health and private sector in addition to UN organization) supporting vaccine research and immunization program and health emergencies. Noreen A. Hynes, M.D., M.P.H., is a physician trained and board-certified in internal medicine and infectious diseases, with additional tropical medi- cine and epidemiology training. She earned an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University in 1979 and her M.D. from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in 1985. Dr. Hynes completed a residency in inter- nal medicine and a fellowship in infectious diseases at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. As a Commissioned Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Hynes worked at the Centers for Disease Control Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Peace Corps, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’s) Secretary’s Office. Following the events of late 2001, she served as senior advisor to the Vice President of the United States for Medicine and Public Health (Homeland Security). Before retiring from government service in 2007, Dr. Hynes was the director, Office of Public Health Emer-

APPENDIX B 227 gency Medical Countermeasures (now the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority), and a deputy assistant secretary for Public Health Emergency Preparedness at HHS. Subsequently, for 6 years, she was a member of the National Biodefense Science Board (2014–2019). Since 2014, Dr. Hynes has served as a U.S. participant in a nongovernmental (Track II) Multilateral Biosecurity Dialogue with five Asian countries to promote engagement that helps improve national and regional response to natural, accidental, and deliberate biological events. Since 1997, Dr. Hynes has served on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. David C. Kaslow, M.D., serves as PATH’s Chief Scientific Officer, support- ing PATH’s Drug Innovation and Access Initiative and Center for Vaccine Innovation and Access (CVIA). As CVIA head, Dr. Kaslow leads PATH’s work to advance immunization equity and vaccination coverage to reduce vaccine-preventable diseases through increasing and improving affordability, availability, acceptability, and sustainability of essential existing and new vaccines for routine immunization and pandemic/epidemic preparedness and response, particularly for those living in the lowest resource settings. His 35+ years of experience in product development and introduction include serving in the U.S. government (U.S. Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), biotech (Vi- cal), multinational pharma (Merck Research Laboratories), and nonprofit (PATH) sectors. Dr. Kaslow also serves on several advisory committees, in- cluding the World Health Organization’s Product Development of Vaccines Advisory Committee and SAGE Working Group on COVID-19 Vaccines. Pinar Keskinocak, Ph.D., is the William W. George Chair and Professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech and an adjunct professor in the Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. She is the co-founder and di- rector of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Systems at Georgia Tech. Her expertise spans infectious disease modeling and supply chain manage- ment to address challenges in infectious disease prevention and control, utilizing a multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder systems perspective. Her research has focused on disease modeling, evaluating intervention strat- egies, and resource distribution for a variety of infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, Guinea worm, malaria, pandemic flu, and polio. She also has extensive experiences in process improvement for health care delivery as well as disaster preparedness, response, recovery. She has collaborated with a variety of organizations including CARE, Carter Center, Centers for Dis- ease Control and Prevention, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Georgia De- partment of Public Health, and Task Force for Global Health. Her research

228 GLOBALLY RESILIENT SUPPLY CHAINS has been published in several leading academic journals including American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, Critical Care Medicine, Journal of Asthma, Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, Operations Research, Prenatal Diagnosis, Transplant Infectious Disease, PLoS One, and Vaccine. Saad B. Omer, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., Ph.D., is the director of the Yale Insti- tute for Global Health, and a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Yale University, Schools of Medicine and Public Health. He has conducted studies in the United States, Guatemala, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and South Africa. Dr. Omer’s research portfolio includes epidemiology of respiratory viruses such as influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and—more recently—SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19); clinical trials to estimate efficacy of maternal and/or infant influenza, pertussis, polio, measles, and pneumococcal vaccines; and trials to evaluate drug regimens to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. He has published more than 360 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has mentored more than 100 junior faculty, clinical, and research postdoctoral fellows and Ph.D. and other graduate students. Jennifer Pancorbo, Ph.D., is director of industry programs and research at the Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC), where she continuously builds the center’s relationship with the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries through the programs she leads: Bioprocess Services, Bioprocess Research, and the Professional Development program. Dr. Pancorbo is responsible for courses in pharmaceutical production, particularly vaccine manufacturing, and supports professional develop- ment courses in both upstream and downstream processing. In addition, she functioned as project coordinator for BTEC’s international influenza vaccine manufacturing program. She has more than 15 years of experience in biomanufacturing, 5 of these focused in the vaccine field, particularly in developing downstream purification processes and optimizing upstream production strategies for vector vaccines at AlphaVax Human Vaccines, Inc. Dr. Pancorbo has a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a doctorate in chemical and biochemical engineering from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where she focused on the design and development of targeted drug delivery. STAFF Kenisha M. P. Jefferson, M.P.H., is a program officer and study director at the National Academies’ Health and Medicine Division. Ms. Jefferson has more than 12 years of global health research and project manage-

APPENDIX B 229 ment experience on a broad range of topics. Before joining the National Academies, she worked at the Business Group on Health, where she was responsible for managing special projects related to the social determi- nants of health, global employee health and well-being, and grant-funded work on global overweight and obesity. Prior to her role at the Business Group, Ms. Jefferson was a global health officer in the U.S. Depart- ment of Health and Human Services’ Office of Global Affairs where she worked to support intra- and interagency coordination for global health policies. She also interned for the Centers for Disease Control and Pre- vention’s Division of Global Health Protection, where she served as a health communications specialist. From 2008 to 2013, she worked for the Institute of Medicine’s Board on Global Health, providing writing, research, and project support for three consensus studies: Preparing for the Future of HIV/AIDS in Africa: A Shared Responsibility, Ensuring Safe Foods and Medical Products Through Stronger Regulatory Sys- tems Abroad, and Countering the Problem of Falsified and Substandard Drugs. She holds an M.P.H. in global health from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and a B.A. from Temple University in the sociology of health. Elizabeth Ashby, M.S., is a research associate with the Board on Global Health. Previously, she conducted research in collaboration with the PREDICT project for global disease surveillance to assess risk factors for zoonotic disease transmission in Kenya. She also previously worked with a private consulting company to apply social marketing interventions and innovative technologies to pressing global health issues. Her primary in- terests include applying a “One Health” lens to analyze challenges related to emerging pandemic threats. She has an M.S. in environmental science from George Mason University, where she studied the intersection of hu- man, animal, and environmental health. Emilie Ryan-Castillo is a senior program assistant with the Board on Global Health, working on the four influenza consensus studies. In the past, she was a program assistant at FHI 360 and worked on diabetes prevention and childhood obesity research projects. In this role, she helped organize several large meetings bringing together the top researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. Recently, she served as a rural community health volunteer in Peace Corps Benin, where she worked on improving maternal health, vaccination rates, and commu- nity outreach at a local clinic in the Borgou Department. She has a B.S. in public health from American University.

230 GLOBALLY RESILIENT SUPPLY CHAINS Claire Biffl is a senior program assistant with the Board on Global Health, working on the four influenza consensus studies. She also works with the Forum on Microbial Threats. Her major interests are in international rela- tions and global health. She has a B.A. in anthropology and a minor in political science with high honors from Emory University. Her senior thesis was an ethnographic study of gerontological topics as observed in an inde- pendent senior living facility in Georgia. Patricia A. Cuff, M.S., M.P.H., is a senior program officer for the Board on Global Health in the Health and Medicine Division (HMD) where she directs the Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education— a position she has held since 2012. She also leads an HMD study looking at mutual recognition agreements in the regulation of medicines, funded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and a special COVID-19-related project with select academies in Africa. Ms. Cuff worked for 11 years on the African Science Academy Development Initiative where she was the country liaison to the Uganda National Academy of Sciences. She has directed and codirected other studies at the National Academies including Clinical Trials During the 2014–2015 Ebola Outbreak, Options for Over- seas Placement of U.S. Health Professionals, and Enhancing the Behavioral and Social Science Content of Medical School Curricula, as well as working on the report Emerging Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century. Before joining the National Academies, she worked at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City in the field of HIV nutrition as a coun- selor, researcher, and lecturer on topics of adult and pediatric HIV. She has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Connecticut and an M.S. in nutrition and an M.P.H. in population and family health from Columbia University. Julie A. Pavlin, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is senior director of the Board on Global Health of the Health and Medicine Division and is board certified in preventive medicine and public health. She is a retired colonel in the U.S. Army with previous assignments including the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences in Bangkok, Thailand; the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research; and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases. After she retired from active duty, she served as deputy director of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. She concentrated most of her time with the U.S. Department of Defense in the design of real- time disease surveillance systems and was a cofounder of the International Society for Disease Surveillance.

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Influenza viruses, both seasonal and pandemic, have the potential to disrupt the health and well-being of populations around the world. The global response to the COVID-19 pandemic and prior public health emergencies of international concern illustrate the importance of global preparedness and coordination among governments, academia, scientists, policy makers, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and the public to address the threat of pandemic influenza. These health emergencies have revealed opportunities to enhance global vaccine infrastructure, manufacturing, distribution, and administration.

Globally Resilient Supply Chains for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza Vaccines outlines key findings and recommendations to bolster vaccine distribution, manufacturing, and supply chains for future seasonal and pandemic influenza events. This report addresses the challenges of manufacturing and distributing vaccines for both seasonal and pandemic influenza, highlighting the critical components of vaccine manufacturing and distribution and offering recommendations that would address gaps in the current global vaccine infrastructure.

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