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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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C

Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members

Andrea S. Anater, Ph.D., is a senior public health nutrition researcher at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International and an adjunct professor of nutrition at the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As a behavioral scientist, she focuses on behavioral, cultural, and environmental factors and social constructs that influence health behavior change, particularly as they relate to nutrition-related chronic disease prevention and food insecurity. In her work, she strives to integrate her knowledge of health disparities and training in knowledge translation to advance health and health equity. Dr. Anater leads interdisciplinary, multi-institutional research teams. Recently, she led two large-scale, national studies of children’s eating patterns in the United States and Brazil. Prior to joining RTI, Dr. Anater was a National Institutes of Health–National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute predoctoral fellow and a Center for a Livable Future predoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she investigated coping strategies used by food-insecure individuals and the associated mediating influences and modifying mechanisms, and performed nutrition-related policy research at the Rutgers University Department of Nutritional Sciences and at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Among her accomplishments, Dr. Anater was awarded the Johns Hopkins Minority Health Award and served as a visiting scholar at the RIDGE Center for National Food and Nutrition Assistance Research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Dr. Anater has an M.P.H. from the Rutgers University School of Public Health, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Cheryl Anderson, Ph.D., is a professor and the dean of the University of California, San Diego, Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science, with a joint appointment in the Department of Medicine’s Division of Nephrology and Hypertension. She serves as the director of the University of California, San Diego, Center of Excellence in Health Promotion and Equity. Dr. Anderson’s research is focused on nutrition and chronic disease prevention with a goal of equitably improving human health, including the development of nutrition policy strategies for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and diet-related cancers, and the promotion of healthy behavior and the elimination of health disparities by personal and environmental factors. Dr. Anderson has served on the Pan American Health Organization’s Technical Advisory Group on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention through Dietary Salt Reduction, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board, and the 2015 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. She is the chair of the American Heart Association’s (AHA’s) Council of Epidemiology and Prevention and the immediate past chair of the AHA nutrition committee. She currently serves on the editorial board of Circulation and Annual Reviews of Nutrition. Dr. Anderson was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Medicine in 2016. She has a B.S. from Brown University, an M.P.H. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and an M.S. in epidemiology and a Ph.D. in nutritional sciences from the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine.

Tom Baranowski, Ph.D., is an applied behavioral scientist with a substantial understanding of diet and nutrition. As a “social problem solver,” he uses the best that behavioral and related sciences has to offer to solve meaningful social problems. Sometimes this involves observational, preferably longitudinal research, and sometimes it involves designing and testing interventions, but it always involves being concerned about the quality of the measures employed. Dr. Baranowski was an early leader in the development of self-report indicators of dietary intake among children (1980s). He pioneered the use of home- and school-based observations of child dietary intake as the primary method of validation of self-report methods, and he proposed a conceptual model of children’s dietary self-reporting. After more than 30 diverse methodological studies, he led the team that did the formative research for the development of the ASA24-Kids, a computer-assisted, self-completed method of diet assessment among children, formerly available on the National Cancer Institute website. He consulted on the development of comparable methods for use with children in England, Portugal, and Brazil. He recently co-authored a paper on best practices for validating self-report measures of dietary intake and is collaborating on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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adapting a chest-worn camera procedure (taking images at 4-second intervals throughout the day), developed by M. Sun and colleagues for use by adults, to the needs and abilities of children 8 years of age and older. This method offers the promise of substantially reducing self-report error in the objective assessment of children’s dietary intake, but it faces new method challenges. He earned an undergraduate degree in politics from Princeton University, and master’s and doctoral degrees in social psychology from the University of Kansas (Lawrence). He has more than 500 publications to his name.

Traci Bekelman, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a research assistant professor fellow in the Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes (LEAD) Center and the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. She completed her undergraduate training in exercise physiology at the University of California, Berkeley; her M.P.H. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; and her doctoral training in biological anthropology at the University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Bekelman’s research examines obesity-related health disparities among children. She uses both qualitative and quantitative methods to examine how biology, culture, and the social and physical environments interact to influence variation in lifestyle behaviors and obesity across populations. She is a collaborator in the Environmental influences of Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program, with ongoing projects within ECHO related to dietary assessment and the impact of societal changes during the COVID-19 pandemic on children’s lifestyle behaviors.

Carol Boushey, Ph.D., is an associate research professor in the Epidemiology Program at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center. She directs the Nutrition Support Shared Resource for the Cancer Center. She also holds an adjunct professor position in the Nutrition Science Department, Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Indiana. Her research focuses on dietary assessment using technology and examining the relationship of dietary intakes or dietary patterns as an exposure for health or risk for disease. She was appointed to the 2020 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee and served as the chair of the Dietary Patterns Subcommittee. Dr. Boushey serves on the Board of Editors of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (JAND) and Nutrition Today. She is a member of the JAND statistical team, which has published papers and book chapters to guide practitioners, students, and scientists to conduct successful research and report findings. She received a B.Sc. from the University of Washington in Seattle; an M.P.H. from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu; and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington through the interdisciplinary nutrition program and the epidemiology program.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Diane Catellier, Dr.PH., is a senior statistician at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International. She has more than 20 years of experience in collaborative research and the coordination of large-scale public health studies. She has been the principal investigator (PI) for the coordinating centers for five multisite clinical trials and four prospective cohort studies funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). In this role, she has contributed to the design, implementation (data management and monitoring), analysis, and publication of study data. She is currently the PI for the Clinical Trials Development Resource for Hematologic Disorders, which provides assistance to investigators supported by NHLBI to develop clinical trials to test new therapies for hematologic disorders. She is also engaged in two nutrition-related studies—one that will provide data on the feeding patterns of U.S. infants, toddlers, and preschoolers and another that will evaluate the effectiveness of campaigns to increase child access to, and participation in, federal nutrition programs that address child hunger. Dr. Catellier has helped develop and evaluate interventions for the treatment of depression in cardiac patients and the treatment of schizophrenia or metabolic disorders associated with the use of antipsychotic medications for the treatment of disease and to increase physical activity in children and adolescents. She has been involved in exploring risk factors for heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and cognitive impairment and the impact of acculturation on the health among U.S. Hispanics in two NHLBI-sponsored cohort studies. She has also helped design and implement an evaluation of several U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–supported, community-based public health prevention and control programs using data from existing surveillance systems and primary data collection efforts.

Dana Dabelea, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology and pediatrics and the director of the Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes (LEAD) Center at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (UC AMC). She is a national leader in the study of prenatal and postnatal developmental, environmental and behavioral factors contributing to childhood obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, and their consequences throughout the life span. Her experience includes perinatal, pediatric, and adult studies with community-based and clinic-based sampling, and longitudinal follow-up. As the director of the LEAD Center she oversees several National Institutes of Health– and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–funded grants totaling a budget of more than $18 million. Dr. Dabelea has a record of engaging and mentoring students, fellows, and junior faculty across many research projects. Dr. Dabelea is a recipient of the UC AMC Graduate School’s Mentoring Award, the American Diabetes Association Kelly West Award for Epidemiology, and the University of Colorado System Elizabeth D. Gee Memorial Lectureship Award, which

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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recognizes and honors an outstanding faculty member of the University of Colorado for efforts to advance women in academia, interdisciplinary scholarly contributions, and distinguished teaching. She received an M.D. (1990) and a Ph.D. in clinical sciences (1997) from the University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Timisoara, Romania.

Stephen R. Daniels, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor and the chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. He is also the pediatrician-in-chief and the L. Joseph Butterfield Chair in Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Dr. Daniels held numerous academic and clinical appointments at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital before joining the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children’s Hospital Colorado. His area of expertise is in preventive cardiology, with a long-time interest in the application of sophisticated epidemiologic and biostatistical methods to pediatric clinical research problems. The role of lifestyle factors, such as diet and physical activity, is central to many of Dr. Daniels’s studies. Dr. Daniels has received numerous awards and honors throughout his career. He has been an active participant and leader in many national investigative committees and study sections, including the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Nutrition, the American Heart Association’s (AHA’s) Council for Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, and the International Pediatric Hypertension Association’s Executive Board, which he recently chaired. He has also served as a frequent participant in grant review study sections and science panels of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Daniels has served as an associate editor for the Journal of Pediatrics since 1995. He is the co-author of Medical Epidemiology, an introductory textbook for medical students, and the co-author and editor of the book Pediatric Prevention of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease. In 2015, he was awarded the Gold Heart Award, which is AHA’s highest volunteer honor. In 2020, Dr. Daniels was elected into membership in the American Association of Physicians. He earned an M.D. from the University of Chicago in 1977, an M.P.H. from Harvard University in 1979, and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina in 1989. He completed his residency in pediatrics and his fellowship in pediatric cardiology at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, in 1981 and 1984, respectively.

Esa M. Davis, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.A.F.P., is an associate professor of medicine and clinical and translational science at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Davis is a practicing family physician who maintains a busy primary care practice at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Montefiore Hospital and coordinates a women’s health contraception clinic at Children’s Primary Care Center in Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Dr. Davis’s research areas of interest include understanding perinatal determinants of maternal obesity and associated adverse health outcomes. Her research has contributed new knowledge on the relationship of perinatal risk factors for maternal obesity and associated racial disparities, and related adverse health outcomes, such as gestational diabetes and peripartum cardiomyopathy. She has served on prior National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees, including Implementation and Dissemination of 2009 Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines; Understanding the Dynamic Relationship Between Biology, Environment, and Early Childhood Development on Risk of Obesity; and Strategies to Limit Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in Young Children. Dr. Davis earned an M.D. from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School and completed a residency in family medicine at Overlook Hospital in New Jersey. She completed her postdoctoral research fellowship as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar and a National Research Service Award Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She earned an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She was also a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harold Amos and an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality K12 Comparative Effectiveness Research Scholar.

Roberta De Vito, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Biostatistics and the Data Science Initiative at Brown University, is a statistician with a passion for developing statistical tools for cancer research and disorder risk, with a particular focus on epidemiology and genomics. Her main research interest is on machine learning and statistical tools to understand public health issues. In this big picture, she develops Bayesian approaches and machine learning techniques to investigate overall diet, or critical aspects of the diet, and its contribution to health and disease, including cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Emma Foster, Ph.D., is a nutrition consultant experienced in dietary assessment methodology. During her previous role at Newcastle University (United Kingdom) she led a team conducting research on the methods of assessing dietary intake of children and young adults, with a particular focus on portion size assessment and technology-based methods of dietary assessment. Her research included (1) assessing the effectiveness of a school-based healthy eating intervention, (2) developing and validating methods of portion size estimation for use with children, and (3) assessing the appropriateness of European Union legislation on food packaging for children that required precise information on the type and amount of foods consumed and the packaging they came in and included in-school observations along with weighed food records kept by parents. Her work led to the develop-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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ment of the Young Person’s Food Atlas, a series of portion size images for use with children 18 months to 16 years of age. More recently she led the development and validation of Intake24, an open-source, self-completed computerized dietary recall system based on the multiple-pass 24-hour recall for use with young people 11 years of age and older. Intake24 is now used in the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey and has been developed for Denmark, Portugal, the United Arab Emirates, and Australia.

Erica P. Gunderson, Ph.D., M.S., M.P.H., R.D., is an epidemiologist and Research Scientist III at the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Her research program elucidates the roles of pregnancy and lactation in the development of cardiometabolic disease in women during mid-life, as well as fetal life and early postnatal behaviors affecting the metabolic health of offspring exposed to maternal obesity and diabetes. Her studies are among the first to evaluate the continuum from preconception through pregnancy and postpartum lactation in relation to future health in women. She is the principal investigator of the Study of Women, Infant Feeding and Type 2 Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes Pregnancy, a diverse prospective cohort of more than 1,000 women with gestational diabetes to investigate risk factors for the progression to type 2 diabetes. Her early career experience involved provision of clinical medical nutrition therapy (registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator) to pregnant women in Los Angeles County public health settings and in California’s Sweet Success, Diabetes and Pregnancy Program and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. Dr. Gunderson was a member of the Organizing Committee on Lactation and Future Risk of Cardiometabolic Diseases in Women for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Workshop on Nutrition During Pregnancy and Lactation, Washington, DC, January 29–30, 2020. She is internationally recognized for her life-course studies of women of diverse races and ethnicities across the childbearing years through mid-life. She has authored more than 125 peer-reviewed original research papers and reviews on the pregnancy and lactation-related lasting effects on obesity, metabolomics, and cardiometabolic health in women. Dr. Gunderson received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley, and the Warren Winkelstein Award for Excellence in Graduate Studies in Epidemiology; an M.P.H. and an M.S. in nutritional sciences and public health from the University of California, Berkeley; and a B.S. in biological sciences from Stanford University.

Lisa J. Harnack, Dr.PH., M.P.H., is a professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. She also serves as the director of the Nutrition Coordinating Center and the co-director of the Healthy Weight

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Research Center at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on developing improved methods and databases for assessing food and nutrient intake. In addition, she carries out research to identify policies and programs that may alleviate nutrition inequities. She is trained in both nutrition (B.S. in dietetics from the University of Wisconsin Stout) and public health nutrition (M.P.H. and Dr.PH. from the University of California, Berkeley). In 2009 Dr. Harnack served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Meal Patterns and Nutrient Standards.

Amy Herring, Sc.D., is the Sara and Charles Ayres Distinguished Professor of Statistical Science at Duke University, with secondary appointments in global health and biostatistics and bioinformatics. Her research focuses on methodological work in statistics and collaborations in public health and medicine, and she has published more than 275 peer-reviewed manuscripts in these areas. Her methodological research program is supported by the National Institutes of Health, and her research interests lie in methods for longitudinal and multivariate data, missing or mismeasured data, and Bayesian inference. Her collaborative interests include maternal and child health, nutrition, and reproductive and environmental epidemiology. Dr. Herring has held major leadership positions in numerous professional organizations, including as the president of ENAR (the largest professional organization of biostatisticians in North America); the chair of the Biometrics Section and the chair-elect of the Section on Bayesian Statistical Science of the American Statistical Association; the executive secretary of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis; and on the Executive Board of the International Biometric Society. Dr. Herring is currently a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. She has received numerous awards for her work, including the Janet L. Norwood Award for Outstanding Achievement by a Woman in Statistical Sciences (2019), the Lagakos Distinguished Alumni Award from the Harvard University Department of Biostatistics (2018), the Mortimer Spiegelman Award for outstanding public health statistician under age 40 (2012) from the American Public Health Association, and the Gertrude M. Cox Award for outstanding contributions to applied statistics (2012) from the Washington Statistical Society and Research Triangle International Institute. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the International Statistics Institute. She received an Sc.D. in biostatistics at Harvard University in 2000.

Nicholas Horton, Sc.D., is the Beitzel Professor of Technology and Society (Statistics and Data Science) at Amherst College. He teaches courses in statistics, data science, and related fields and is passionate about improving

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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quantitative and computational literacy for students with a variety of backgrounds. He has worked to deepen engagement and mastery of higher-level concepts and data acumen. As an applied biostatistician, Dr. Horton’s work is based squarely within the mathematical and computational sciences but spans other fields in order to ensure that research is conducted on a sound footing. The real-world research problems that these investigators face often require the use of novel solutions and approaches, because existing methodology is sometimes inadequate. Bridging the gap between theory and practice in interdisciplinary settings is often a challenge and has been a particular focus of Dr. Horton’s work in missing data methods and longitudinal regression. Dr. Horton is the chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics (CATS), served as the chair of the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies, as a member of the National Academies Roundtable on Data Science Postsecondary Education, and was a member of the National Academies Data Science for Undergraduates consensus study. Dr. Horton has published more than 180 papers in statistics and biomedical research and 4 books on statistical computing and data science. He has been the recipient of a number of teaching awards and the American Statistical Association Founders Award. Dr. Horton is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He earned an A.B. from Harvard College and an Sc.D. in biostatistics from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Susan L. Johnson, Ph.D., is a professor of pediatrics in the Section of Nutrition at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Dr. Johnson is an internationally recognized expert in early childhood nutrition, specifically the impact of the environment on the development of children’s eating behaviors and growth. She has received continuous federal funding for more than 25 years and has written more than 150 refereed journal articles, proceedings, and chapters. The Children’s Eating Laboratory, under her direction, currently focuses its investigations on (1) the impacts of family eating and child-feeding strategies on young children’s eating behavior and growth, (2) complementary feeding practices for infants and toddlers, and (3) assessment of children’s dietary intake.

Angela D. Liese, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology at the University of South Carolina. As a nutritional epidemiologist, Dr. Liese has focused on dietary patterns, food groups, and foods and their interactions, using a wide variety of methods. She is a founding member of the Dietary Patterns Methods Consortium, which has been supported by the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Liese also has a long-standing track record of research in diabetes epidemiology with a focus on diabetes in youth and young adults.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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She is an investigator of the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study and the DiCAYA Network. Dr. Liese’s recent research has focused on social determinants of health, food security, hunger, the community food environment, and spatial food access issues, nested within the larger domain of diabetes epidemiology. Her research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Heart Association. Dr. Liese has published more than 200 peer-reviewed manuscripts, including many with her students or mentees. Dr. Liese is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology where she chairs the Career Mentoring Committee. She received a Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina, an M.P.H. at the University of Massachusetts, and holds a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Bonn, Germany.

Katie Loth, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Loth’s programmatic line of research has focused on social and environmental influences on the dietary intake, eating behaviors, and weight status of individuals from ethnically and racially diverse and low-income backgrounds. Dr. Loth brings to her research a strong background of multidisciplinary training in nutrition, public health, epidemiology, childhood obesity and eating disorders, mixed methods, and methodological research. Dr. Loth has experience with and is currently engaged in research using ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to understand how an individual’s environment influences their ability to achieve and maintain a healthy body weight, healthful dietary intake patterns, and a healthy relationship with food. As a practicing clinical dietitian and a behavioral epidemiologist, Dr. Loth is driven to pursue the use of novel methods, including EMA, and innovative analytic approaches to untangle complex nutrition-related questions.

Anne-Sophie Morisset, Ph.D., a dietitian, is a researcher at the Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec–Laval University and at the Centre Nutrition, Santé et Société (NUTRISS), of the Institute on Nutrition and Functional Foods (INAF) at Laval University. Dr. Morisset’s research program aims to optimize nutrition during pregnancy in order to promote adequate gestational weight gain, decrease pregnancy complications, and reinforce current nutritional recommendations for both normal and at-risk pregnancies. She works closely with clinical nutritionists working in the area of perinatal nutrition in the province of Quebec. Her work has been funded to date by the Fonds de recherche Santé-Québec, the CHU de Québec Foundation, the CMDO network, the Danone Institute and the Canada Foundation for Innovation. She was trained in the laboratory of Dr. André Tchernof at Laval University where she obtained a Ph.D. in 2012. The objective of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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her work was to examine the links between nutritional factors, gestational diabetes, and gestational weight gain. After obtaining her Ph.D., she joined the laboratory of Dr. William D. Fraser at the CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center. From 2013 to 2015, she focused her research on large provincial and Canadian birth cohorts (MIREC and 3D), where she studied, among others, vitamin D, iron, and calcium intakes in pregnant women. She was recruited as a professor at the School of Nutrition of the Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences of Laval University in July 2015, where she obtained her agrégation in 2020.

Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of preventive medicine and public health, followed her postgraduate training in nutrition with work focused on nutritional epidemiology, nutrition education, and community health. She has coordinated population nutritional surveys at the local, regional, and country level and has contributed to research in the field of food habits, community-based interventions, and school-based interventions, with a particular focus on school age children. Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo is currently a professor at the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) in Bilbao (Spain).

Wei Perng, Ph.D., is a nutritional epidemiologist who focuses on maternal and child health. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and the assistant director of omics research at the Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes Center at the Colorado School of Public Health. Her research interests fall under three lines of inquiry: (1) elucidating early-life determinants of childhood obesity and related metabolic sequelae; (2) identifying biological pathways that underlie excess weight gain during early life; and (3) understanding how maternal condition during the peripartum period predict her future cardiovascular and metabolic health. Dr. Perng received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

Katherine Sauder, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of pediatric nutrition at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the assistant director for translation research at the Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes Center. Dr. Sauder’s research examines how nutrition and other health behaviors are related to chronic disease risk in women and children. She uses both observational and intervention methods to identify and target health behaviors that can reduce risk for diabetes and obesity, with ongoing projects spanning the transgenerational cycle from pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and the child-bearing years. She completed her doctoral training in biobehavioral health at The Pennsylvania State University and her postdoctoral fellowship in nutrition at the University of Colorado.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Anna Maria Siega-Riz, Ph.D., M.S., is the dean and a professor in the Departments of Nutrition and Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dr. Siega-Riz’s research focuses on the first 1,000 days of life by understanding the influence of maternal weight status and dietary patterns and behaviors in the etiology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including, but not limited to, gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, preterm birth, and inadequate or excessive gestational weight gain. She is also exploring food reward and sensitivity among pregnant women and early determinants of childhood obesity and the association of maternal preconceptional health with childhood eating and weight status among Hispanics. Dr. Siega-Riz currently serves on the National Institutes of Health’s Council of Councils; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Health and Medicine Division’s Food and Nutrition Board; and as a board of trustees member for the International Food Information Council. Previously she served on the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Advisory Council; the U.S. Department of Agriculture/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Pregnancy Technical Expert Committee, B-24-month Project; and five Institute of Medicine committees, as well as having chaired the Nutrition During Pregnancy and Lactation: Exploring New Evidence—A Workshop held in 2020. Dr. Siega-Riz holds a B.S.P.H. from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; an M.S. in food, nutrition, and food service management from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; and a Ph.D. in nutrition with a minor in epidemiology from the Gillings School of Global Public Health. She held the credentials of a registered dietician from 1983–2014.

Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Dr.PH., is an associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has more than 14 years of nutrition research experience as a biostatistician and a collaborator in large epidemiologic studies, with expertise in measurement error in dietary intake and physical activity, dietary patterns, latent variable models, longitudinal data analysis, and complex survey analysis. Her collaborations include research in obesity, diabetes, and preconceptional and cardiometabolic health. She is a co-investigator at the Coordinating Center of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), the largest multisite, community-based cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States (n = 16,415). Currently, Dr. Sotres-Alvarez is the principal investigator of the HCHS/SOL ancillary study Preconceptional Health of Latinas and its Association with Child Adiposity (R01 DK116028). Dr. Sotres-Alvarez has served as a scientific reviewer for the National Institutes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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of Health (NIH) Biostatistical Methods and Research Design Study Section and has participated in several NIH Special Emphasis Panels for cancer, cardiovascular, and sleep epidemiology. To date, Dr. Sotres-Alvarez has coauthored more than 130 scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals including more than 80 with a focus on diet.

Linda V. Van Horn, Ph.D., R.D., is a professor and the chief of the Nutrition Division in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. She is a clinical nutrition epidemiologist whose research focuses on the primary prevention of cardiometabolic and other chronic diseases beginning in utero and continuing throughout the life course. Her research involvement included the study of Cardiovascular Risk Development in Young Adults, the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial, and the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (SOL) and in SOL Youth. As the principal investigator she served on several multicenter collaborative trials, including the Diet Intervention Study in Children, the Women’s Health Initiative, and currently the International Study of Macro/Micro Nutrient Intake and Blood Pressure. She is also studying the DASH diet intervention among the offspring of mothers with overweight/obesity recruited from MOMFIT, a randomized clinical trial preventing excessive gestational weight gain. Dr. Van Horn served as the editor of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics from 2003 to 2013. She chaired the 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) and served on the 2020 U.S. DGAC. She chaired or served on several National Institutes of Health task forces and workshops including the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Workshop on Medical Nutrition Education. She is an active member of the American Heart Association’s Council on Epidemiology and Lifestyle, specifically serving on the Nutrition Committee. Dr. Van Horn did her undergraduate training in nutrition and dietetics at Purdue University and her doctoral work at the University of Illinois, Chicago, involving adolescent blood pressure response to a sodium-restricted diet.

Beth Widen, Ph.D., is a registered dietitian and an assistant professor at The University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Nutritional Sciences within the School of Human Ecology in the College of Natural Sciences. Dr. Widen is also faculty at Dell Pediatric Research Institute, faculty research associate at the Population Research Center, and affiliate faculty in the Departments of Women’s Health and Pediatrics at Dell Medical School. Dr. Widen is a nutritional and perinatal epidemiologist and takes a life-course approach to her research at the intersection of nutrition, perinatal and pediatric epidemiology, and human biology. She develops and applies advanced analytic methods and interdisciplinary approaches to rigorously

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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evaluate the role of nutrition during the first 1,000 days on the short- and long-term health of mothers and their children. Dr. Widen leads a nutritional phenotyping pregnancy cohort study, Mother Infant NutriTion Study and is the co-principal investigator of Mothers And careGivers Investing in Children, a mother–caregiver–infant feeding intervention program among low-income Hispanic families that focuses on healthy eating during infancy and responsive caregiving. In addition, she leads several other projects focused on maternal and child nutrition among high-risk populations, including examining pregnancy outcomes among women with twin gestations and women with obesity, and investigating maternal and offspring body composition among HIV-exposed and unexposed dyads in Kenya and Uganda. Dr. Widen holds a B.S. in dietetics from Miami University and a Ph.D. in nutrition from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to completing her Ph.D., Dr. Widen was an Intramural Research Training Award Fellow at the National Institutes of Health. Following her Ph.D., she completed an interdisciplinary postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University in the Institute of Human Nutrition and the Department of Epidemiology. Dr. Widen has received many accolades including a K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and an Early Career Award from the Thrasher Research Fund.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Page 112
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Page 115
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 121
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 122
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
×
Page 123
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Speakers and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26374.
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Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age: Proceedings of a Workshop Series Get This Book
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A virtual workshop series titled Approaches to Assessing Intake of Food and Dietary Supplements in Pregnant Women and Children 2 to 11 Years of Age was convened in May, 2021 by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The four-day workshop series explored the evidence on methodological approaches to assessing intake of food and dietary supplements in pregnant women and children 2 to 11 years of age.

Obtaining reliable and valid dietary intake information for these population groups is particularly difficult - in pregnancy, rapid changes in nutrient needs and dietary intakes occur, and in young children, much of dietary intake is consumed outside the home and is often misreported by the children or their proxy reporters. To advance the quality of the science in these areas, the workshop had four goals: identify the suite of current methods used in dietary assessments, including food and dietary supplements, in pregnant women and children 2 to 11 years of age; identify the methodological challenges and opportunities in improving current methods; explore methodologies in other disciplines and their application in dietary assessments in those populations; and discuss factors to consider when implementing dietary assessment tools in those populations. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions of the workshop series.

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