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Suggested Citation:"Authors." National Research Council. 1995. Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4758.
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Authors

Norlin J. Benevenga (Chair) is professor of meat and animal science and nutritional sciences at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He received his Ph.D. in nutrition in 1965 from the University of California, Davis. His research interests include nutrition and metabolism of amino acids, especially methionine and lysine and the nutrition and metabolism of the newborn. Benevenga also served as a member of the Board on Agriculture's Committee on Animal Nutrition and the previous subcommittee on laboratory animal nutrition.

Christopher Calvert is currently a professor of animal science at the University of California, Davis, where he has served since 1980. He received his Ph.D. in animal science from Purdue University. His research interests include protein and energy metabolism, growth, lactation, and systems analysis.

Curtis D. Eckhert is professor and vice-chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry from Cornell University. Eckhert was head of the Division of Nutritional Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, from 1989 to 1993. Research interests include the physiology and biochemistry of microvascular selenium.

George C. Fahey is professor of animal sciences and nutritional sciences at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He received the Ph.D. in animal nutrition from West Virginia University in 1976. Research interests include comparative carbohydrate nutrition, ruminal and lower gut fermentation processes, and plant cell wall biochemistry as it applies to nutrition.

Janet L. Greger is professor of nutrition at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. From 1975 to 1989, Greger was a principal grants investigator for the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. She received her Ph.D. in nutrition from Cornell University. Research interests include mineral metabolism from a nutritional and toxicological point of view; minerals studied include aluminum, calcium, zinc, tin, and copper.

Carl L. Keen is a professor of nutrition and internal medicine at the University of California, Davis, from where he also received his Ph.D. in nutrition. He is currently chair of the Department of Nutrition. Research interests include mineral metabolism and developmental nutrition.

Joseph J. Knapka, since 1967, has served as a nutritionist at the National Institutes of Health's Division of Research Services. Currently he is special assistant to the acting director of the Veterinary Resources Program. He holds a Ph.D. in animal science from the University of Tennessee. Research interests include physiology and feeding management of laboratory animals.

Hulda Magalhaes is professor emerita of zoology at Bucknell University, where she began as an assistant professor of physiology in 1946. She received her Ph.D. in marine zoology from Duke University. Research interests include nutrition and metabolism of human and hamster subjects.

Olav T. Oftedal is a research nutritionist in the zoological research department at the National Zoological Park, Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. in nutrition from Cornell University. Research interests include the nutrient requirements of zoo animals and wildlife, the lactation strategies and early development of mammals, and the interactions of nutrition and ecology in reptiles, seals, primates, and other species.

Suggested Citation:"Authors." National Research Council. 1995. Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4758.
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Philip G. Reeves currently serves as supervisory research chemist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Nutrient Function Management Unit of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks, North Dakota. He received his Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of Illinois. Research interests include zinc and reproduction, trace element metabolism and interaction, and laboratory animal nutrition.

Helen Anderson Shaw chairs the Department of Food, Nutrition and Food Service Management at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Previously a professor of nutrition at the University of Missouri, Shaw received her Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of Wisconsin. Research interests include amino acid nutrition in humans and small animals.

John Edgar Smith is an associate professor of human nutrition at Pennsylvania State University's College of Health and Human Development. He received his Ph.D. in nutrition from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Research interests include fat-soluble vitamin transport in blood and protein metabolism.

Robert D. Steele is assistant professor of nutrition at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, from where he also received his Ph.D. in nutrition and biochemistry. Research interests include investigating the central role of the liver in amino acid and protein metabolism in mammals, especially in conditions of altered function such as liver disease and cirrhosis.

Suggested Citation:"Authors." National Research Council. 1995. Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4758.
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Suggested Citation:"Authors." National Research Council. 1995. Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4758.
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Page 154
Suggested Citation:"Authors." National Research Council. 1995. Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4758.
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Page 155
Suggested Citation:"Authors." National Research Council. 1995. Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4758.
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Page 156
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Nutrient Requirements of Laboratory Animals,: Fourth Revised Edition, 1995 Get This Book
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In the years since the third edition of this indispensable reference was published, a great deal has been learned about the nutritional requirements of common laboratory species: rat, mouse, guinea pig, hamster, gerbil, and vole.

The Fourth Revised Edition presents the current expert understanding of the lipid, carbohydrate, protein, mineral, vitamin, and other nutritional needs of these animals. The extensive use of tables provides easy access to a wealth of comprehensive data and resource information. The volume also provides an expanded background discussion of general dietary considerations.

In addition to a more user-friendly organization, new features in this edition include:

  1. A significantly expanded section on dietary requirements for rats, reporting substantial new findings.
  2. A new section on nutrients that are not required but that may produce beneficial results.

New information on growth and reproductive performance among the most commonly used strains of rats and mice and on several hamster species.

  1. An expanded discussion of diet formulation and preparation--including sample diets of both purified and natural ingredients.
  2. New information on mineral deficiency and toxicity, including warning signs.

This authoritative resource will be important to researchers, laboratory technicians, and manufacturers of laboratory animal feed.

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