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Suggested Citation:"B Contributors." National Research Council. 1995. Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technological Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4761.
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B
Contributors

Many individuals contributed to the committee's thinking and its drafting of various sections of the report by serving as presenters, consultants, and advisers. The list below acknowledges these contributors and their affiliations.

Bishnu Atal, American Telephone & Telegraph

Kurt Akeley, Silicon Graphics, Inc.

Walter Aviles, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Norman Badler, University of Pennsylvania

Paul Barham, Naval Postgraduate School

Klaus Biggers, University of Utah

William Bricken, University of Washington

Martin Buehler, McGill University

Matt Conway, University of Virginia

Hari Das, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Thomas DeFanti, University of Illinois-Chicago

Paul DiZio, Brandeis University

John Falby, Naval Postgraduate School

Scott Foster, Crystal River Engineering

Eric Foxlin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Blake Hannaford, University of Washington

Vincent Hayward, McGill University

Eric Howlett, Leep Systems

Ian Hunter, McGill University

Charles Hutchenson, Dartmouth College

Suggested Citation:"B Contributors." National Research Council. 1995. Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technological Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4761.
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Bonnie John, Carnegie Mellon University

Kenneth Kaplan, Harvard University

Kristen M. Kelleher, Naval Postgraduate School

Thomas Knight, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Arthur Kramer, University of Illinois

Ronald Kruk, CAE Electronics

Jaron Lanier, Consultant

Jeng-Feng Lee, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Ming C. Lin, Naval Postgraduate School

Michael R. Macedonia, Naval Postgraduate School

John Makhoul, BBN Laboratories, Inc.

David Mizell, Boeing

Joshua Mogal, Silicon Graphics, Inc.

Steve Molnar, University of North Carolina

Thomas Piantanida, SRI International

David Pratt, Naval Postgraduate School

Richard Satava, Advanced Research Projects Agency

Barbara Shinn-Cunningham, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Kenneth Stevens, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Alan Steward, Apparel CIM Center

Susumu Tachi, University of Tokyo

Thomas Wiegand, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

James Winget, Silicon Graphics, Inc.

Thomas Zeffiro, National Institutes of Health

David Zeltzer; Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Advisers

Scott Fisher, Telepresence

Richard Held, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Thomas Sheridan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

George Zweig, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Consultant

Harold Van Cott, National Research Council

Liaison

Lawrence W. Stark, Committee on Human Factors

Sponsors

Bernard Corona, Human Research and Engineering Directorate, Army Research Laboratory

Suggested Citation:"B Contributors." National Research Council. 1995. Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technological Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4761.
×

Brenda Thein, Human Research and Engineering Directorate, Army Research Laboratory

John Tangney, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Col. William Strickland, Human Resource Directorate, Armstrong Laboratory, Brooks AFB

Hendrick Ruck, Human Resource Directorate, Armstrong Laboratory, Brooks AFB

Kenneth Boff, Human Engineering Division, Crew Systems Directorate, Armstrong Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB

Robert Eggleston, Human Engineering Division, Crew Systems Directorate, Armstrong Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB

Claire Gordon, U.S. Army Natick R&D Center

James Sampson, U.S. Army Natick R&D Center

James Jenkins, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Y. T. Chien, National Science Foundation

John Hestenes, National Science Foundation

George Cotter, National Security Agency

Norman Glick, National Security Agency

Sharon Stanfield, Sandia National Laboratory

Suggested Citation:"B Contributors." National Research Council. 1995. Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technological Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4761.
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Page 526
Suggested Citation:"B Contributors." National Research Council. 1995. Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technological Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4761.
×
Page 527
Suggested Citation:"B Contributors." National Research Council. 1995. Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technological Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4761.
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Page 528
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Virtual Reality: Scientific and Technological Challenges Get This Book
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Despite widespread interest in virtual reality, research and development efforts in synthetic environments (SE)--the field encompassing virtual environments, teleoperation, and hybrids--have remained fragmented.

Virtual Reality is the first integrated treatment of the topic, presenting current knowledge along with thought-provoking vignettes about a future where SE is commonplace.

This volume discusses all aspects of creating a system that will allow human operators to see, hear, smell, taste, move about, give commands, respond to conditions, and manipulate objects effectively in a real or virtual environment. The committee of computer scientists, engineers, and psychologists on the leading edge of SE development explores the potential applications of SE in the areas of manufacturing, medicine, education, training, scientific visualization, and teleoperation in hazardous environments.

The committee also offers recommendations for development of improved SE technology, needed studies of human behavior and evaluation of SE systems, and government policy and infrastructure.

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