National Academies Press: OpenBook

Counting People in the Information Age (1994)

Chapter: APPENDIX: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

« Previous: References
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1994. Counting People in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4796.
×
Page 223
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1994. Counting People in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4796.
×
Page 224
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1994. Counting People in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4796.
×
Page 225
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 1994. Counting People in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4796.
×
Page 226

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

APPENDIX Biographical Sketches of Pane] Members and Staff NORMAN M. BRADBURN is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake distinguished service professor in the Department of Psychology and the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago, as well as senior vice president for research at the National Opinion Research Center. He is an author- ity on nonsampling errors in surveys and has written extensively on questionnaire design. He has been active in the developing field of research applying cognitive psychological principles to the study of response errors in surveys. He received B.A. degrees from the University of Chicago and Oxford University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical and social psychology from Harvard University. ROBERT M. BELL is a senior statistician and head of the statistics group at the RAND Corporation. He has worked on a number of different projects, mainly in health and education. His areas of expertise include survey design, survey analy- sis, and general experimental design issues. He received a B.S. degree in math- ematics from Harvey Mudd College, an M.S. degree in statistics from the Univer- sity of Chicago, and a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Stanford University. GORDON }. BRACKSTONE is assistant chief statistician responsible for sta- tistical methodology, computing, and geography at Statistics Canada. His profes- sional work has been in survey methodology, particularly the assessment of the quality of census and survey data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in statistics from the London School of Eco- nom~cs. 223

224 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES CLIFFORD C. CLOGG is a demographer and statistician at Pennsylvania State University. He is a former chairman of the Committee on Population Statistics of the Population Association of America and a member of the Census Advisory Committee; he was the coordinating and applications editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. His areas of specialization are categorical data analysis and social statistics. He received a B.A. degree from Ohio University, and an M.S. degree in statistics and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Chicago. TlIOMAS B. LABILE is a statistical consultant who specializes in the areas of sampling, survey research methods, and statistical policy. He was formerly statistical policy expert for the Energy Information Administration, chief math- ematical statistician for the Social Security Administration, and chief of the Sta- tistical Research Division of the Bureau of the Census. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute. He has a B.S. degree in mathematics and an M.S. degree in economics and science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. KATHERINE S. NEWMAN is a professor of anthropology at Columbia Uni- versity. She specializes in cultural analyses of work and mobility in the suburban middle class and in inner-city communities. She has written extensively on the topic of downward mobility and is currently engaged in a study of minority youth in low-wage, service-sector jobs in the Harlem section of New York and Oak- land, California. She has a B.A. degree from the University of California, San Diego, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley. ANU PEMMARAZU is a senior project assistant with the Committee on Na- tional Statistics, National Research Council. She is also currently working with the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems and previously worked on the Panel on the National Health Care Survey. She re- ceived a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Maryland, College Park. D. BRUCE PETRIE is assistant chief statistician of the Social, Institutions, and Labor Statistics Field at Statistics Canada. He is responsible for social statistics, which includes the census of population, demography, education, health, justice, labor, and household surveys, including Canada's equivalent of the Current Popu- lation Survey. He has a bachelor of commerce degree from Dalhousie University and an M.B.A. degree from the University of Western Ontario. PETER A. ROGERSON is professor and chair of geography at the State Uni- versity of New York, Buffalo. His areas of specialization include internal migra

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 225 lion, mathematical demography, and estimates and projections. He was formerly a research trainee at the Census Bureau in the Census Bureau/American Statisti- cal Association program on economic-demographic modeling. He received a B.A. degree from the State University of New York, Albany, an M.A. degree from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. degree in geography from the State University of New York, Buffalo. KEITH F. RUST is an associate director at Westat, Inc., and formerly was with the Australian Bureau of Statistics. He is the director of sample design and statistical operations for the National Assessment of Educational Progress, as well as the sampling coordinator for the Third International Mathematics and Science Study. His work deals mainly with educational surveys; he has expertise in the areas of variance estimation and inference for complex samples. He is a member of the Committee on National Statistics, the editorial board of the Jour- nal of Official Statistics, and the faculty of the University of Maryland-University of Michigan Joint Program in Survey Methodology. He received a B.A. degree from Flinders University of South Australia and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in bio- statistics from the University of Michigan. NORA CATE SCHAEFFER is professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her areas of expertise include respondent behavior and interviewer-respondent interaction. Her past research has concentrated on a num- ber of different areas in survey methodology dealing with nonsampling error, both nonresponse and response errors of various kinds. She is on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly, Sociological Methodology, and Sociological Methods Research. She has an A.B. degree from Washington University and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. EDWARD A. SCHILLMOELLER is senior vice president of the A.C. Nielsen Company, where he directs all statistical operations and activities of the media research division. His work includes both continuous and ad hoc household surveys of television audiences. His interests are sample design and survey methods. He received a degree in mathematics from Iowa State University and an M.B.A. degree in statistics from the University of Chicago. DUANE L. STEFFEY is a study director with the Committee on National Statis- tics, National Research Council. He is on leave from San Diego State University, where he is an associate professor of mathematical sciences. He has published research on statistical methods, particularly on hierarchical Bayesian modeling, and has engaged broadly in interdisciplinary research and consulting. He re- ceived a B.S. degree and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics, all from Carnegie Mellon University.

226 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES MICHAEL F. WEEKS is director of Survey Research Associates, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Battelle Memorial Institute. His areas of expertise include survey methods and operations. In particular, he is interested in survey methods aimed at reducing nonsampling error and making survey operations more effi- cient and more cost-effective. He is on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly. He received a B.A. degree from Davidson College and an M.A. degree from the Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest. ALAN M. ZASLAVSKY is an associate professor of statistics at Harvard Uni- versity. His research interests include methods for estimating and correcting census undercount, applications of hierarchical Bayes methods, microsimulation modeling, and missing data. He has an A.B. degree from Harvard College, an M.S. degree from Northeastern University, and a Ph.D. degree in applied math- ematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. MEYER ZITTER is an independent demographic consultant and was formerly with the Bureau of the Census. He was chief of the Bureau's population division in the year leading to the 1980 census and later served as assistant director for international programs. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. He received a B.B.A. degree from City College of New York.

Counting People in the Information Age Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $55.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

How do you count a nation of more than 250 million people--many of whom are on the move and some of whom may not want to be counted? How can you obtain accurate population information for apportioning the House of Representatives, allocating government resources, and characterizing who we are and how we live?

This book attempts to answer these questions by reviewing the recent census operations and ongoing research and by offering detailed proposals for ways to improve the census.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!