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Suggested Citation:"A Commissioned and Contributed Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1995. The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4903.
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A Commissioned and Contributed Papers

Nancy Adler, Ph.D., Professor of Medical Psychology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, and Warren Miller, M.D., Director, Transnational Family Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA. ''Individual-Level Variables: The Reasons Behind the Rates"

Jane Delano Brown, Ph.D., Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications, and Jeanne Steele, M.S., Docotoral Candidate, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. "Sex, Pregnancy and the Mass Media"

Allan Carlson, Ph.D., President, The Rockford Institute, Rockford, IL. "The Views of Theologically and Socially Conservative American Groups on Contraception, Family Planning and Related Issues"

Betty Connell, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. "Contraception"

William D'Antonio, Ph.D., retired Executive Officer of the American Sociological Association. "Human Sexuality, Contraception, and Abortion: Policies, Attitudes and Practices Among America's Major Religious Groups"

Jacqueline Darroch Forrest, Ph.D., Vice President for Research, Katherine Kost, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate, and Susheelah Singh, Ph.D., Associate Director of Research, The Alan Guttmacher Institute, New York, NY. "Investigation of the Impact of Pregnancy Intention Status on Women's Behavior During Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes"

Vanessa Gamble, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, and Judith Houck, M.A., Graduate Student, Department of the History of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, WI. "A High Voltage Sensitivity': A History of African Americans and Birth Control"

Suggested Citation:"A Commissioned and Contributed Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1995. The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4903.
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Shelly Gehshan, M.A., Deputy Director, Southern Regional Project on Infant Mortality, Washington, DC. "The Provision of Family Planning Services in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs"

Debra Haffner, M.P.H., Executive Director, Sex Information and Education Council of the United States, New York, NY. "Sexuality Issues and Contraceptive Use" and "Sexuality Education and Contraceptive Instruction in U.S. Schools"

Lisa Kaeser, J.D., Senior Public Policy Associate, and Cory L. Richards, Vice President for Public Policy, The Alan Guttmacher Institute, Washington, DC. "Barriers to Access to Reproductive Health Services"

Frances Kissling, President, Catholics for Free Choice, Washington, DC. "Roman Catholic Perspectives and Policy Initiatives on Sexuality and Reproduction"

Jacob Klerman, Ph.D., Economist, Rand Corporation, Santa Monica, CA. "Economic Perspectives on Fertility and Unintended Pregnancy"

Mort Lebow, M.A., Consultant, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC. "Contraceptive Advertising in the United States"

Kathryn London, Ph.D., Linda Peterson, M.A., and Linda Piccinino, M.P.S., Family Growth Survey Branch, National Center for Health Statistics, Washington, D.C. "The National Survey of Family Growth: Principal Source of Statistics on Unintended Pregnancy"

James Marks, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. "Health Effects of Induced Abortion" and "Spontaneous and Induced Abortions and the Risk of Breast Cancer"

Rebecca Maynard, Ph.D., Trustee Professor of Education, Social Policy and Communication, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. "The Effectiveness of Interventions on Repeated Pregnancy and Childbearing"

Kristin Moore, Ph.D., Executive Director, and Dana Glei, M.A., Child Trends, Inc., Washington, DC. "The Consequences of Teenage Childbearing" and "The Demography of Unintended Pregnancy"

Kathleen Morton, M.S., Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Population and Family Health, Columbia University, New York, NY. "Effects of Pregnancy Planning on Women's Health and Well-Being"

Jeannie Rosoff, J.D., President, The Alan Guttmacher Institute, New York, NY. "The Political Storms Over Family Planning"

Freya Sonenstein, Ph.D., Director, Population Studies Center, The Urban Institute, Washington, DC, and Joseph Pleck, Ph.D., Senior Research Associate, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA. "The Male Role in Family Planning: What Do We Know?"

Suggested Citation:"A Commissioned and Contributed Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1995. The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4903.
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Koray Tanfer, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation, Battelle Memorial Institute, Seattle, WA. "Determinants of Contraceptive Use: A Review"

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Many of these papers have been submitted to journals for publication. Individuals wishing to receive copies of selected papers may contact the Institute of Medicine to request single copies, to be put in touch with the primary authors, and/or to locate the journal(s) in which selected papers have been published.

Suggested Citation:"A Commissioned and Contributed Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1995. The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4903.
×
Page 275
Suggested Citation:"A Commissioned and Contributed Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1995. The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4903.
×
Page 276
Suggested Citation:"A Commissioned and Contributed Papers." Institute of Medicine. 1995. The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4903.
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Experts estimate that nearly 60 percent of all U.S. pregnancies--and 81 percent of pregnancies among adolescents--are unintended. Yet the topic of preventing these unintended pregnancies has long been treated gingerly because of personal sensitivities and public controversies, especially the angry debate over abortion. Additionally, child welfare advocates long have overlooked the connection between pregnancy planning and the improved well-being of families and communities that results when children are wanted.

Now, current issues--health care and welfare reform, and the new international focus on population--are drawing attention to the consequences of unintended pregnancy. In this climate The Best Intentions offers a timely exploration of family planning issues from a distinguished panel of experts.

This committee sheds much-needed light on the questions and controversies surrounding unintended pregnancy. The book offers specific recommendations to put the United States on par with other developed nations in terms of contraceptive attitudes and policies, and it considers the effectiveness of over 20 pregnancy prevention programs.

The Best Intentions explores problematic definitions--"unintended" versus "unwanted" versus "mistimed"--and presents data on pregnancy rates and trends. The book also summarizes the health and social consequences of unintended pregnancies, for both men and women, and for the children they bear.

Why does unintended pregnancy occur? In discussions of "reasons behind the rates," the book examines Americans' ambivalence about sexuality and the many other social, cultural, religious, and economic factors that affect our approach to contraception. The committee explores the complicated web of peer pressure, life aspirations, and notions of romance that shape an individual's decisions about sex, contraception, and pregnancy. And the book looks at such practical issues as the attitudes of doctors toward birth control and the place of contraception in both health insurance and "managed care."

The Best Intentions offers frank discussion, synthesis of data, and policy recommendations on one of today's most sensitive social topics. This book will be important to policymakers, health and social service personnel, foundation executives, opinion leaders, researchers, and concerned individuals. May

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