National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates (1998)

Chapter: Appendix B Examples of Infectious Diseases That Preclude the Safe Housing of Mixed Genera of Nonhuman Primates

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Examples of Infectious Diseases That Preclude the Safe Housing of Mixed Genera of Nonhuman Primates." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
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B—
Examples of Infectious Diseases That Preclude the Safe Housing of Mixed Genera of Nonhuman Primates1

Disease Agent

Reservoir Host

Susceptible Host

CMV

Macaca sp.

Saguinus sp.

Entamoeba histolytica

Macaca sp.

Ateles sp.

 

 

Lagothrix sp.

 

 

Callitrichidae

Herpesvirus ateles

Ateles sp.

Saguinus oedipus

Herpesvirus saimiri

Saimiri sciureus

Callithrix sp.

 

 

Aotus sp.

 

 

Ateles sp.

 

 

Cebus sp.

 

 

Cercopithecus aethiops

Herpesvirus T

Saimiri sciureus

Aotus sp.

 

Ateles sp.

Saguinus sp.

 

Cebus albifrons

 

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Macaca sp.

Saimiri sciureus

 

 

Aotus sp.

 

 

Ateles sp.

 

 

Cebus sp.

Rubeola

Macaca sp.

Saimiri sciureus

 

 

Cebus sp.

 

 

Callithrix sp.

1  

Does not include many common entric or respiratory bacterial infections or parasitic infections.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Examples of Infectious Diseases That Preclude the Safe Housing of Mixed Genera of Nonhuman Primates." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
×

SHF

Erythrocebus patas

Macaca fascicularis

 

Papio cynocephalus

Macaca arctoides

 

Cercopithecus aethiops

Macaca nemestrina

 

 

Macaca assamensis

 

 

Macaca mulatta

SV40

Macaca mulatta

Macaca fascicularis

 

 

Erythrocebus patas

 

 

Cercopithecus aethiops

 

 

Pan sp.

YABA

Macaca mulatta

Macaca fascicularis

 

 

Macaca arctoides

 

 

Macaca nemestrina

 

 

Erythrocebus patas

 

 

Cercopithecus aethiops

 

 

Cercocebus torquatus

 

 

atys

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Examples of Infectious Diseases That Preclude the Safe Housing of Mixed Genera of Nonhuman Primates." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
×
Page 156
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Examples of Infectious Diseases That Preclude the Safe Housing of Mixed Genera of Nonhuman Primates." National Research Council. 1998. The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4909.
×
Page 157
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A 1985 amendment to the Animal Welfare Act requires those who keep nonhuman primates to develop and follow appropriate plans for promoting the animals' psychological well-being. The amendment, however, provides few specifics.

The Psychological Well-Being of Nonhuman Primates recommends practical approaches to meeting those requirements. It focuses on what is known about the psychological needs of primates and makes suggestions for assessing and promoting their well-being.

This volume examines the elements of an effective care program--social companionship, opportunities for species-typical activity, housing and sanitation, and daily care routines--and provides a helpful checklist for designing a plan for promoting psychological well-being.

The book provides a wealth of specific and useful information about the psychological attributes and needs of the most widely used and exhibited nonhuman primates. Readable and well-organized, it will be welcomed by animal care and use committees, facilities administrators, enforcement inspectors, animal advocates, researchers, veterinarians, and caretakers.

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