National Academies Press: OpenBook

Science and the Endangered Species Act (1995)

Chapter: Appendix C Biographical Information on Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Information on Committee Members ." National Research Council. 1995. Science and the Endangered Species Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4978.
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Page 259
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Information on Committee Members ." National Research Council. 1995. Science and the Endangered Species Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4978.
×
Page 260
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Information on Committee Members ." National Research Council. 1995. Science and the Endangered Species Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4978.
×
Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C Biographical Information on Committee Members ." National Research Council. 1995. Science and the Endangered Species Act. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4978.
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Page 262

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About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please APPENDIX C 260 University of Virginia; MAT, Johns Hopkins University; PhD, zoology, University of Hawaii; and JD, Harvard Law School. William L. Fink is associate professor and associate curator of fishes, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Formerly, he was assistant curator of fishes and assistant professor, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. His areas of expertise include systematics of neotropical freshwater fishes, systematics of mesopelagic fishes, and systematic theory. Dr. Fink has a BS, University of Miami; MS, University of Southern Mississippi; and PhD, biology, George Washington University. John Harte holds a joint professorship in Soil Science and Energy and Resources at the University of California, Berkeley. His areas of expertise include subalpine ecology, ecological impacts of climate change and acid precipitation, ecosystem modeling, and conservation biology. He has a BA, Harvard University; and PhD, physics, University of Wisconsin. Oliver A. Houck is professor of law, Tulane University, New Orleans, La. His areas of expertise include environmental law, natural resources law, criminal law, toxics and hazardous wastes, and water resources and international environmental law. He has written on the Endangered Species Act. He has a BA, Harvard University; and JD, Georgetown Law Center. Michael Lynch is director, Ecology and Evolution Program, University of Oregon, Eugene. His areas of expertise include the integration of ecology, genetics, and evolution; the limits to phenotypic evolution; the neutral theory of evolution; conservation biology; evolution of life-history strategies; biology of parthenogenesis; the biology of aging; and quantitative genetics methodology. Dr. Lynch has a BS, St. Bonaventure University, New York; and PhD, University of Minnesota. Lynn A. Maguire is an associate professor, Practice of Environmental Management, Duke University, Durham, N.C. Her research interests include the application of quantitative methods (including simulation modeling, statistics, and decision theory) to natural resource management; decision analysis and simulation modeling of endangered species management; conservation biology; forest fragmentation; and application of decision analysis for environmental dispute resolution in endangered species management and multiple-use land planning. She has an AB, Harvard University; MS, resource ecology, University of Michigan; and PhD, wildlife science, Utah State University. Dennis D. Murphy is director, Center for Conservation Biology and senior use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.

About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please APPENDIX C 261 research associate, Stanford University. His areas of expertise include habitat conservation planning, conservation biology, the Endangered Species Act, and the ecology of butterflies. Dr. Murphy has a BS, entomology, University of California, Berkeley; and PhD, biological sciences, Stanford University. Patrick Y. O'Brien is team leader, Ecology, Chevron Research and Technology Company, Richmond, California. Dr. O'Brien has expertise in the following areas: environmental impact assessment, endangered species conservation planning, ecological risk assessment, wetlands delineation, natural resource damage assessment, habitat restoration, and the environmental elements of oil spill contingency planning and response. He has a BA, zoology, University of California, Berkeley; MS, water quality biology, University of California, Irvine; and PhD, ecology, University of California, Irvine. Steward T. A. Pickett is member, Rutgers Graduate Ecology Faculty; adjunct professor, University of Connecticut; and scientist, Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York. His areas of expertise include succession in plants, comparative ecology, and effects of disturbance on plant ecology. Dr. Pickett has a BS, University of Kentucky; and PhD, botany, University of Illinois, Urbana. Katherine Ralls is a research zoologist, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Her areas of expertise are the biology of mammals, mammalian social behavior, conservation biology, the genetic problems of small captive and wild populations, field studies of threatened and endangered species, and the development and testing of decision-making tools to improve management of threatened and endangered species. Dr. Ralls has a BA, Stanford University; MA, Radcliffe College; and PhD, biology, Harvard University. Beryl B. Simpson is chair, Department of Botany and professor of botany, The University of Texas, Austin. Dr. Simpson's areas of expertise are plant ecology and evolution. Dr. Simpson has an AB, Radcliffe College; and MA and PhD, Harvard University. Rollin D. Sparrowe is president, Wildlife Management Institute, Washington, D.C. His areas of expertise include research, legislation, and implementation of public programs that benefit wildlife; and development and implementation of federal policy on migratory birds, wetlands, waterfowl, migratory-bird hunting regulations, and endangered species. He has a BS, game management, Humboldt State University; MS, wildlife management, South Dakota State University; and PhD, wildlife ecology, Michigan State University. use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.

About this PDF file: This new digital representation of the original work has been recomposed from XML files created from the original paper book, not from the original typesetting files. Page breaks are true to the original; line lengths, word breaks, heading styles, and other typesetting-specific formatting, however, cannot be retained, and some typographic errors may have been accidentally inserted. Please APPENDIX C 262 David W. Steadman is senior scientist and curator of birds, New York State Museum and Biological Survey, and adjunct curator of fossil birds, Burke Memorial Museum, University of Washington. Dr. Steadman's areas of expertise include the systematics, biogeography, conservation, ecology, and paleoecology of vertebrates. He has a BS, biology, Edinboro State College; MS, zoology, University of Florida; and PhD, geosciences, University of Arizona. James M. Sweeney is manager, Wildlife Issues, Champion International Corporation. His areas of expertise include habitat use and ecology of white-tailed deer and eastern wild turkey, elk, feral hogs, bobwhite quail, and spotted owls; stand dynamics of southern pine beetle infestations; oven bird and wood thrush, neotropical migratory birds, and other forestry-wildlife habitat interactions. Dr. Sweeney has a BS, forestry, MS, wildlife, University of Georgia; and PhD, wildlife, Colorado State University. Staff David Policansky is associate director of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology at the National Research Council, Washington, D.C. His interests include genetics, evolution, and ecology, particularly the effects of fishing on fish populations, ecological risk assessment, and natural resource management. He has a BA, biology, from Stanford University and MS and PhD, biology, from the University of Oregon. Patricia Peacock, now director of partner programs at the Wildlife Management Institute, Washington, D.C., was staff officer, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, National Research Council, Washington, D.C. (until February 1995). Her interests include the management of natural resources, especially forestry and fisheries. She has a BS, pharmacy, from the University of Montana, MS, fisheries, from the University of Alaska, and MPA from the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Adriénne Davis is senior program assistant in the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, National Research Council, Washington, D.C. Her interests are information technology and management and education. She has a BS, business education, from the University of Maryland and MA, computers in education and training, from Trinity College. use the print version of this publication as the authoritative version for attribution.

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Science and the Endangered Species Act Get This Book
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The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is a far-reaching law that has sparked intense controversies over the use of public lands, the rights of property owners, and economic versus environmental benefits.

In this volume a distinguished committee focuses on the science underlying the ESA and offers recommendations for making the act more effective.

The committee provides an overview of what scientists know about extinction--and what this understanding means to implementation of the ESA. Habitat--its destruction, conservation, and fundamental importance to the ESA--is explored in detail.

The book analyzes

  • Concepts of species--how the term "species" arose and how it has been interpreted for purposes of the ESA.
  • Conflicts between species when individual species are identified for protection, including several case studies.
  • Assessment of extinction risk and decisions under the ESA--how these decisions can be made more effectively. The book concludes with a look beyond the Endangered Species Act and suggests additional means of biological conservation and ways to reduce conflicts. It will be useful to policymakers, regulators, scientists, natural-resource managers, industry and environmental organizations, and those interested in biological conservation.
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