National Academies Press: OpenBook

Nursing, Health, and the Environment (1995)

Chapter: Appendix A: Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse

« Previous: Appendixes
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse." Institute of Medicine. 1995. Nursing, Health, and the Environment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4986.
×

A Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse's Role in Safeguarding the Human Environment*

The preservation and improvement of the human environment has become increasingly important for man's survival and well-being. The vastness and urgency of the task place on every individual and every professional group the responsibility to participate in the efforts to safeguard man's environment, to conserve the world's resources, to study how their use affects man, and how adverse effects can be avoided.

THE NURSE'S ROLE IS TO:

Help detect ill effects of the environment on the health of man, and vice-versa. The nurse should:

  • apply observational skills for the detection of ill effects of environment on the individual;

  • observe individuals in all settings for effects of pollutants in order to advise on protective and/or curative measures;

  • record and analyze observations made of ill effects on environment and/or pollutants on individuals;

*  

From International Council of Nurses, The Nurse's Role in Safeguarding the Human Environment. Position Statement. 1986. Geneva, Switzerland. Used with permission of the International Council of Nurses.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse." Institute of Medicine. 1995. Nursing, Health, and the Environment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4986.
×
  • be informed and report observations of the ecological consequences of pollutants and their adverse effects on the human being.

Be informed and apply knowledge in daily work with individuals, families, and/or community groups as to the data available on potential health hazards and ways to prevent and/or reduce them. The nurse should be informed about:

  • the studies and identification of the environmental problems at local, national, and international level;

  • their effects on man;

  • the standards for the protection of the human organism, especially from pollutants;

  • ways to prevent and/or reduce health hazards.

Be informed and teach preventive measures about health hazards due to environmental factors as well as about conservation of environmental resources to the individual, families, and/or community groups. The nurse can:

  • request and attend continuing education programs about the study of the environment and the application of this knowledge in daily life and work;

  • provide health education for both the general public and health personnel in order to create awareness of environmental issues and to involve the public with environmental management and control;

  • apply knowledge in areas where nursing intervention may prevent or reduce health hazards;

  • report on steps taken to control the significant environmental problems of the area.

Work with health authorities in pointing out health care aspects and health hazards in existing human settlements and in the planning of new settlements. Nurses can:

  • participate in exchange of information and experience about similar environmental problems with authorities in other areas;

  • cooperate with health authorities in the preparation of programs to enable national and local authorities to influence their own environments;

  • participate in the promotion of legislation to improve health care and reduce/prevent health hazards, and encourage the enforcement of such legislation where/when appropriate;

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse." Institute of Medicine. 1995. Nursing, Health, and the Environment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4986.
×
  • participate in national/local pre-disaster planning; and cooperate in international programs in case of disasters in other countries.

Assist communities in their action on environmental health problems. The nurse can assist communities in programs to:

  • reduce harmful pollutants (chemical, biological or physical, e.g., noise) in air, soil, water, and food by industries or other human efforts;

  • improve nutrition;

  • encourage family planning;

  • assess environmental factors in work situations and pursue activities for the elimination or reduction of hazards;

  • educate the general public and all levels of nursing personnel in environmental and other health hazards, especially those related to unacceptable levels of contamination.

Participate in research providing data for early warning and prevention of deleterious effects of the various environmental agents to which man is increasingly exposed; and research conducive to discovering ways and means of improving living and working conditions. The nurse, as principal investigator or in collaboration with other nurses or related professions, can carry out epidemiological and experimental research designed to provide data for:

  • early warning for prevention of health hazards;

  • improving living and working conditions;

  • monitoring the environmental levels of pollutants;

  • measuring the impact of nursing intervention on environmental hazards.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse." Institute of Medicine. 1995. Nursing, Health, and the Environment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4986.
×
Page 131
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse." Institute of Medicine. 1995. Nursing, Health, and the Environment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4986.
×
Page 132
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Position Statement from the International Council of Nurses: The Nurse." Institute of Medicine. 1995. Nursing, Health, and the Environment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/4986.
×
Page 133
Next: Appendix B: Environmental Hazards for the Nurse as a Worker »
Nursing, Health, and the Environment Get This Book
×
Buy Hardback | $65.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

America's nurses, an estimated 2 million strong, are often at the frontlines in confronting environmental health hazards. Yet most nurses have not received adequate training to manage these hazards.

Nursing, Health, and the Environment explores the effects that environmental hazards (including those in the workplace) have on the health of patients and communities and proposes specific strategies for preparing nurses to address them.

The committee documents the magnitude of environmental hazards and discusses the importance of the relationship between nursing, health, and the environment from three broad perspectives

  • Practice--The authors address environmental health issues in the nursing process, potential controversies over nurses taking a more activist stance on environmental health issues, and more.
  • Education--The volume presents the status of environmental health content in nursing curricula and credentialing, and specific strategies for incorporating more environmental health into nursing preparation.
  • Research--The book includes a survey of the available knowledge base and options for expanding nursing research as it relates to environmental health hazards.
  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!