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Undersea Vehicles and National Needs (1996)

Chapter: D U.S. Government Agencies That Own and/or Use Submersibles

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Suggested Citation:"D U.S. Government Agencies That Own and/or Use Submersibles." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×

APPENDIX E Deep Submersible Vehicles in Service or Available Worldwide

Country

Submersible

Operator

Depth

Date Built or Modified

USAa

Alvin

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

4,500 m

1964/mod 1973

 

Clelia

Harbor Branch Institution of Oceanography

350 m

1974

 

Delta

Delta Oceanographics, Inc.

300 m

1982

 

Diving Saucer

Jacques Cousteau Society

350 m

1959

 

Nekton Gamma

Carribean Research Lab

300 m

1970

 

NR-1

U.S. Navy

700 m

1969

 

Pisces V

University of Hawaii

1,500 m

1973

 

Sea Cliff

U.S. Navy

6,000 m

1964/mod 1982

 

Sea-Link 1

Harbor Branch

800 m

1971

 

Sea-Link 2

Harbor Branch

800 m

1975

 

Snooper

Undersea Graphics

300 m

1969

 

Turtle

U.S. Navy

3,000 m

1968/mod 1985

Russiab

Argos

P.P. Shirshov Institute

600 m

1975

 

MIR I

P.P. Shirshov Institute

6,000 m

1987

 

MIR II

P.P. Shirshov Institute

6,000 m

1987

 

Osmotr

P.P. Shirshov Institute

300 m

1985

 

Pisces XI

P.P. Shirshov Institute

2,000 m

1975

 

Pisces VII

P.P. Shirshov Institute

2,000 m

1975

Ukrainec

Sever 2

Academy of Science

2,000 m

1969

 

Sever 2 Bis

Academy of Science

2,000 m

1970

 

Benthos I

Academy of Science

300 m

1969

 

Benthos II

Academy of Science

300 m

1972

 

Tinro-2

Academy of Science

400 m

1973

 

Tinro-2 Bis

Academy of Science

400 m

1974

Franced

Cyana

IFREMER

3,000 m

1970

 

Deep Rover 2

Ellipse Program

1,000 m

1994

 

Deep Rover 2

Ellipse Program

1,000 m

1994

 

Nautile

IFREMER

6,000 m

1985

 

Saga

IFREMER

600 m

1987

 

SO-450-Vaimana

Papete, Tahiti

Industrie et

Tourisme Sous-Marin

450 m

1982

Japan

Shinkai 2000

JAMSTEC

2,000 m

1981

 

Shinkai 6500

JAMSTEC

6,500 m

1987

Canada

Deep Rover

Can Dive

1,000 m

1984

 

Pisces IV

Institute of Ocean Science

2,000 m

1972

Suggested Citation:"D U.S. Government Agencies That Own and/or Use Submersibles." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×

Country

Submersible

Operator

Depth

Date Built or Modified

Romaniae

SC-200

Institute of Oceanology

200 m

1979

 

SM-358

Institute of Oceanology

300 m

1979

Switzerland

A.F. Forel

Piccard

500 m

1979

Germany

JAGO

Max Planck Institute

500 m

1990

Finland

SM 80/2

Finnish National Board of Waters and Environment

500 m

1990

South Koreaf

Hae Yang 250

Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute

100 m

1988

Bulgariag

PC-8

Institute of Oceanology

200 m

1981

SOURCE: Don Walsh, International Maritime, Inc.

a U.S. Navy submersibles primarily support Navy missions; however, significant amounts of time are provided to the U.S. marine science community each year.

b Because of uncertain economic conditions in Russia, few operations are being conducted at present. Several of these submersibles have been offered for sale.

c Because of uncertain economic conditions in Ukraine, few operations are being conducted at present. Several of these submersibles have been offered for sale.

d Saga is currently in storage. The SO-450 will be used in French Polynesia for scientific and commercial operations.

e The operational status of these submersibles is unknown because of uncertain economic conditions in Romania.

f This Kordi submersible was built in Korea and is currently inactive.

g Because of uncertain economic conditions in Bulgaria, this submersible is believed to be inactive.

Suggested Citation:"D U.S. Government Agencies That Own and/or Use Submersibles." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"D U.S. Government Agencies That Own and/or Use Submersibles." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"D U.S. Government Agencies That Own and/or Use Submersibles." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"D U.S. Government Agencies That Own and/or Use Submersibles." National Research Council. 1996. Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5069.
×
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The United States faces decisions requiring information about the oceans in vastly expanded scales of time and space and from oceanic sectors not accessible with the suite of tools now used by scientists and engineers. Advances in guidance and control, communications, sensors, and other technologies for undersea vehicles can provide an opportunity to understand the oceans' influence on the energy and chemical balance that sustains humankind and to manage and deliver resources from and beneath the sea. This book assesses the state of undersea vehicle technology and opportunities for vehicle applications in science and industry. It provides guidance about vehicle subsystem development priorities and describes how national research can be focused most effectively.

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