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New Materials for Next-Generation Commercial Transports (1996)

Chapter: Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1996. New Materials for Next-Generation Commercial Transports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5070.
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Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

JOHN A.S. GREEN, Chair, received his Ph.D. in electro-chemistry from Queen's University in Belfast, Ireland. During his tenure at Martin Marietta Laboratories, Dr. Green worked in the areas of environmental degradation of aluminum and titanium alloys, integrated aluminum production, and new materials development. He was involved in the development of Weldalite® aluminum-lithium alloys, and XD® metal-matrix composite technology. He is currently director of Advanced Materials at Lockheed Martin Laboratories.

BERNARD BUDIANSKY received a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Brown University. He is currently Gordon McKay Professor of structural mechanics. Emeritus, and Abbot and James Lawrence Professor of engineering, Emeritus, at Harvard University. His research has been in structural mechanics and fracture. Professor Budiansky is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering.

DAVID J. CHELLMAN received an M.S. in materials engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles. He is currently a technical fellow at Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems Company. His experience is in development and application of new materials in aerospace structures, cost and weight trades in design, innovative design, and processing.

LARRY P. CLARK received a B.S. in metallurgical engineering at Washington State University. He was employed at the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories in the Manufacturing Technology program. He is currently manager of parts, materials, and processes at Boeing Defense and Space Group. His experience has been in materials processing, net-shape metals processing, and aircraft component producibility.

JOHN W. GILLESPIE, JR. received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Delaware. He is currently associate director of the Center for Composite Materials at the University of Delaware. Dr. Gillespie's expertise is in continuum mechanics, fracture mechanics, design and analysis of composite structures, and composite manufacturing processes.

CHARLES E. HARRIS received a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He has held positions at Babcock and Wilcox and at Texas A&M University. He is currently head of the Mechanics of Materials Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. He directs research in the area of materials characterization and the development of mechanics models of deformation, durability, and durability of aerospace materials and is the technical manager of the NASA Aging Aircraft Research Program.

MURRAY H. KUPERMAN received a B.S. in metallurgical engineering from University of California at Berkeley and an M.B.A. from the University of Santa Clara and is a licensed professional engineer in the state of California. He is currently a senior staff representative at the United Airlines Maintenance and Operations Center. His experience has been in aircraft repair and maintenance, composites and bonded structures, and aircraft operations.

PAUL A. LAGACE received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is currently professor of aeronautics and astronautics and director of the Technology Laboratory for Advanced Composites. His interests are in composite mechanics, structural design, testing, and manufacturing processes.

VICKI E. PANHUISE received a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of Missouri at Columbia. She is currently director of engineering and technology at AlliedSignal Aerospace. Her interests are in nondestructive testing, advanced materials, materials testing, and artificial intelligence.

KENNETH L. REIFSNIDER received a Ph.D. in metallurgy from The Johns Hopkins University. He is currently professor of engineering mechanics and chairman of the Material Engineering Science Program at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His research is in composite fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing and evaluation.

MICHAEL P. RENIERI received a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He is currently senior principal engineer in the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1996. New Materials for Next-Generation Commercial Transports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5070.
×

Conceptual Design and Structural Development Department at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. His experience is in stress analysis, structural design, composite structures, and innovative manufacturing.

EDGAR A. STARKE received a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the University of Florida. He has held positions at DuPont's Savannah River Laboratory, and at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Virginia where he served as dean of engineering and applied science. He is currently the Earnest Oglesby Professor of materials science at the University of Virginia. Dr. Starke's research is in advanced alloy development, fatigue and fracture, and high-temperature aluminum alloys. He is a member of the National Materials Advisory Board of the National Research Council.

HERBERT J. WARDELL received a B.S. in engineering from Seattle University. He is currently senior staff chief at Gulfstream Aerospace. His experience is in analysis and certification of metallic and composite aircraft structures for light aircraft.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1996. New Materials for Next-Generation Commercial Transports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5070.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1996. New Materials for Next-Generation Commercial Transports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5070.
×
Page 84
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The major objective of this book was to identify issues related to the introduction of new materials and the effects that advanced materials will have on the durability and technical risk of future civil aircraft throughout their service life. The committee investigated the new materials and structural concepts that are likely to be incorporated into next generation commercial aircraft and the factors influencing application decisions. Based on these predictions, the committee attempted to identify the design, characterization, monitoring, and maintenance issues that are critical for the introduction of advanced materials and structural concepts into future aircraft.

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