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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet

A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances

Committee on Comparative Toxicity of Naturally Occurring Carcinogens

Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology

Commission on Life Sciences

National Research Council

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.
1996

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
2101 Constitution Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20418

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee consisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce Alberts is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Harold Liebowitz is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Kenneth I. Shine is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy's purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce Alberts and Dr. Harold Liebowitz are chairman and vice chairman, respectively, of the National Research Council.

The project was supported by the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Cancer Institute, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration under contract no. NO1-ES-25355, and by the American Industrial Health Council and Nabisco Foods.

Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 95-73149

International Standard Book No. 0-309-05391-9

Additional copies of this report are available from the
National Academy Press,
Box 285, Washington, DC 20055.

Copyright 1996 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

First Printing, February 1996

Second Printing, October 1996

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

COMMITTEE ON COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF NATURALLY OCCURRING CARCINOGENS

RONALD ESTABROOK (Chair),

Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Tex.

DIANE BIRT ,

University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Neb.

GARY P. CARLSON ,

Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.

SAMUEL M. COHEN ,

University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Neb.

ERIC E. CONN ,

University of California, Davis, Calif.

NORMAN R. FARNSWORTH ,

College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Ill.

DAVID W. GAYLOR ,

U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Ark.

RICHARD L. HALL ,

Baltimore, Md.

JOHN HIGGINSON ,

Bethesda, Md.

ERNEST HODGSON ,

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C.

LAURENCE N. KOLONEL ,

Cancer Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii

DANIEL K REWSKI ,

Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

CHARLENE A. MCQUEEN ,

University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy, Tucson, Ariz.

MICHAEL W. PARIZA ,

University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisc.

JANARDAN K. REDDY ,

Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Ill.

I. GLENN SIPES ,

University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy, Tucson, Ariz.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

BERNARD WAGNER,

Wagner Associates, Inc., Millburn, N.J.

PAUL B. WATKINS,

Clinical Research Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.

I. BERNARD WEINSTEIN,

Columbia-Presbyterian Cancer Center and Columbia University, College of Physicians, New York, N.Y.

LAUREN ZEISE,

California Environmental Protection Agency, Berkeley, Calif.

BEST Liaisons

ALLAN H. CONNEY,

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, N.J.

DAVID P. RALL,

Washington, D.C.

Staff

CAROL A. MACZKA, Program Director

J. DAVID SANDLER, Project Director

LINDA V. LEONARD, Senior Project Assistant

KATHRINE IVERSON, Library Assistant

Sponsors

National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

National Cancer Institute

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

American Industrial Health Council

Nabisco Foods Group

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

BOARD ON ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND TOXICOLOGY

PAUL G. RISSER (Chair),

Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore.

MICHAEL J. BEAN,

Environmental Defense Fund, Washington, D.C.

EULA BINGHAM,

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio

PAUL BUSCH,

Malcom Pirnie, Inc., White Plains, N.Y.

EDWIN H. CLARK II,

Clean Sites, Inc., Alexandria, Va.

ALLAN H. CONNEY,

Rutgers University, Piscataway, N.J.

ELLIS COWLING,

North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C.

GEORGE P. DASTON,

The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, Ohio

DIANA FRECKMAN,

Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, Colo.

ROBERT A. FROSCH,

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

RAYMOND C. LOEHR,

The University of Texas, Austin, Tex.

GORDON ORIANS,

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.

GEOFFREY PLACE,

Hilton Head, S.C.

DAVID P. RALL,

Washington, D.C.

LESLIE A. REAL,

Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind.

KRISTIN SHRADER-FRECHETTE,

University of South Florida, Tampa, Fla.

BURTON H. SINGER,

Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.

MARGARET STRAND,

Bayh, Connaughton and Malone, Washington, D.C.

GERALD VAN BELLE,

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.

BAILUS WALKER, JR.,

Howard University, Washington, D.C.

TERRY F. YOSIE,

E. Bruce Harrison Co. Washington, D.C.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

Staff

JAMES J. REISA, Director

DAVID J. POLICANSKY, Associate Director and Program Director for Natural Resources and Applied Ecology

CAROL A. MACZKA, Program Director for Toxicology and Risk Assessment

LEE R. PAULSON, Program Director for Information Systems and Statistics

RAYMOND A. WASSEL, Program Director for Environmental Sciences and Engineering

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

COMMISSION ON LIFE SCIENCES

THOMAS D. POLLARD, (Chair),

The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.

FREDERICK R. ANDERSON,

Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, Washington, D.C.

JOHN C. BAILAR III,

University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.

JOHN E. BURRIS,

Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass.

MICHAEL T. CLEGG,

University of California, Riverside, Calif.

GLENN A. CROSBY,

Washington State University, Pullman, Wash.

URSULA W. GOODENOUGH,

Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.

SUSAN E. LEEMAN,

Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Mass.

RICHARD E. LENSKI,

Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.

THOMAS E. LOVEJOY,

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

DONALD R. MATTISON,

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Penn.

JOSEPH E. MURRAY,

Wellesley Hills, Mass.

EDWARD E. PENHOET,

Chiron Corporation, Emeryville, Calif.

EMIL A. PFITZER,

Research Institute for Fragrance Materials, Hackensack, N.J.

MALCOLM C. PIKE,

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif.

HENRY C. PITOT III,

University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisc.

JONATHAN M. SAMET,

The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.

HAROLD M. SCHMECK, JR.,

North Chatham, Mass.

CARLA J. SHATZ,

University of California, Berkeley, Calif.

JOHN L. VANDEBERG,

Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, Texas

PAUL GILMAN, Executive Director

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

OTHER RECENT REPORTS OF THE BOARD ON ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND TOXICOLOGY

Upstream: Salmon and Society in the Pacific Northwest (1996)

Science and the Endangered Species Act (1995)

Wetlands: Characteristics and Boundaries (1995)

Biologic Markers (Urinary Toxicology (1995), Immunotoxicology (1992), Environmental Neurotoxicology (1992), Pulmonary Toxicology (1989), Reproductive Toxicology (1989))

Review of EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (three reports, 1994-1995)

Science and Judgment in Risk Assessment (1994)

Ranking Hazardous Sites for Remedial Action (1994)

Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (1993)

Issues in Risk Assessment (1993)

Setting Priorities for Land Conservation (1993)

Protecting Visibility in National Parks and Wilderness Areas (1993)

Dolphins and the Tuna Industry (1992)

Hazardous Materials on the Public Lands (1992)

Science and the National Parks (1992)

Animals as Sentinels of Environmental Health Hazards (1991)

Assessment of the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program, Volumes I-IV (1991-1993)

Human Exposure Assessment for Airborne Pollutants (1991)

Monitoring Human Tissues for Toxic Substances (1991)

Rethinking the Ozone Problem in Urban and Regional Air Pollution (1991)

Decline of the Sea Turtles (1990)

Tracking Toxic Substances at Industrial Facilities (1990)

Copies of these reports may be ordered from the National Academy Press: (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

Preface

Numerous reports, including some from the National Research Council, have examined the relationship of diet to cancer. It is generally accepted that diet is a contributing factor to the onset or progression of some types of cancer and that a prudent selection of foods, including fruits and vegetables, and avoidance or decreased consumption of other foods might influence the risk to an individual of contracting cancer. But can specific chemicals in our diet be identified as causative agents (carcinogens) or protective agents (anticarcinogens) for cancer? Some naturally occurring chemicals that are part of our diet have been shown in animal models to cause cancer—and therefore might also serve as potential cancer-causative agents in humans. Almost daily, the news media report on the presence of one chemical or another that is claimed to be carcinogenic. Many of these are naturally occurring chemicals. The public is bombarded with reports that raise fear and apprehension.

To make a rational estimate of the risk associated with the diet one must know the level of exposure as well as the carcinogenic potency of a suspected chemical. That basic principle of toxicology is sometimes offset by the belief (often associated with the Delany amendment) that the presence of a potentially hazardous chemical at even minuscule concentrations is dangerous. In addition, the credibility of such a conclusion often depends on the validity of the test used to identify a specific chemical as a carcinogen. Many of

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

the data used in this report are based on studies using the rodent bioassay, where tests are carried out at high exposure levels. The ability to relate results obtained using rodent bioassays to the risk for humans—who are exposed to low levels of a chemical in a complex mixture, such as the diet—is a weakness that puts into question how the results of such evaluations are applied.

This committee has labored diligently and long as it studied, debated, reargued, and wrote the different facets of what some might consider a complex problem that is unsolvable.

As we submit this report we recognize that some readers will look for the identification of a single causative agent to remove from the diet. Others will seek evidence of a panacea—a chemical that will shield them against the causative agents of cancer. Both groups will be disappointed. As the report indicates, we need to know much more than we know today before we can speak with greater certainty about the role of chemicals in the diet as contributors to the burden of cancer in the human population. Such information will come only by continued research, new hypotheses, and a clearer understanding of human biology.

The ability to complete a report of this complexity requires a dedicated staff. We are indebted to efforts and technical expertise of J. David Sandler, project director; Linda V. Leonard, senior project assistant; Carol A. Maczka, program director; Gail Charnley and Richard Thomas (program directors during the early stages of the project); and James J. Reisa, director of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology.

Many distinguished scientists met with the committee and shared their ideas, findings, and interpretations, including: Richard Adamson (National Cancer Institute), Bruce Ames (University of California), Victor Feron (Toxicology and Nutrition Institute, the Netherlands), Adam Finkel (Resources for the Future), Ronald Hart (National Center for Toxicological Research), Donald Hughes (American Industrial Health Council), Richard Jackson (California Department of Health Services), David

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×

Longfellow (National Cancer Institute), Richard Merrill (University of Virginia), Hugh McKinnon (Environmental Protection Agency), Gerard Mulder (Center for Bio-Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sylvius Laboratories, the Netherlands), David Rall, Robert Scheuplein (Food and Drug Administration), Sidney Siegel (National Library of Medicine), and Lee Wattenberg (University of Minnesota). Some of these individuals' affiliations have changed since they provided input to the committee. Our sincere thanks to them for providing guideposts that served to mark the path of progress as the committee deliberated specific issues.

Each member of this committee deserves praise and congratulations for his or her wisdom, dedication, perception, and friendship. Although many sessions were exhausting, the high level of interest of each member made this exercise a rewarding and productive experience. Thanks to each and everyone of you for all your good work.

Ronald W. Estabrook

Chairman

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
×
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens in the Human Diet: A Comparison of Naturally Occurring and Synthetic Substances. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5150.
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Despite increasing knowledge of human nutrition, the dietary contribution to cancer remains a troubling question. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens assembles the best available information on the magnitude of potential cancer risk--and potential anticarcinogenic effect--from naturally occurring chemicals compared with risk from synthetic chemical constituents. The committee draws important conclusions about diet and cancer, including the carcinogenic role of excess calories and fat, the anticarcinogenic benefit of fiber and other substances, and the impact of food additive regulation. The book offers recommendations for epidemiological and diet research. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens provides a readable overview of issues and addresses critical questions: Does diet contribute to an appreciable proportion of human cancer? Are there significant interactions between carcinogens and anticarcinogens in the diet? The volume discusses the mechanisms of carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic properties and considers whether techniques used to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of synthetics can be used with naturally occurring chemicals. The committee provides criteria for prioritizing the vast number of substances that need to be tested. Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens clarifies the issues and sets the direction for further investigations into diet and cancer. This volume will be of interest to anyone involved in food and health issues: policymakers, regulators, researchers, nutrition professionals, and health advocates.

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