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Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate? (1996)

Chapter: Appendix A: Presentations Made to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
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Appendix A Presentations Made to the Committee

Expectations and hopes for the study

Marla Salmon, Director, Division of Nursing, Health Resources and Services Administration; and Ada Sue Hinshaw, Director, National Institute of Nursing Research

Nurse staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

Jean Johnson, Assistant Professor and Dean for Health Sciences Programs, George Washington University Medical Center

Federal/national databases: Availability for analysis

Evelyn Moses, Chief Nursing Data and Analysis Staff, Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration

Influence of availability of nurses on quality of care

Patricia Moritz, Nursing Systems Branch Chief, Extramural Programs Division, National Institute of Nursing Research

Nursing: An important component of hospital survival under a reformed health care system

Patricia Prescott, Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Nursing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
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Nurse burnout, patient outcomes: Staffing ratios versus organization of nursing

Linda Aiken, Trustee Professor of Nursing and Sociology, and Director, Center for Health Services and Policy Research, University of Pennsylvania

Forces affecting employment and work environment of nursing staff in hospitals

Peter Buerhaus, Director, Harvard Nursing Research Institute, Harvard School of Public Health

Study of nursing home staffing ratios: Overview

Marvin Feuerberg, Analyst, Health Standards and Quality Bureau, Health Care Financing Administration and Edward Mortimore, Analyst, Health Standards and Quality Bureau, Health Care Financing Administration

Developing and utilizing a nursing quality report card for acute care: Report of a study conducted for the American Nurses Association by Lewin-VHI

Mary Walker, Chairperson, Congress for Nursing Practice, American Nurses Association, and Associate Professor, University of Kentucky College of Nursing

Results of ongoing and completed research relating to nurse staffing, organizational variables, and quality outcomes in acute care settings: Report of a workshop

Joyce Verran, Professor and Division Director of the Adult Health Nursing Unit, College of Nursing, University of Arizona at Tucson

Nursing in hospitals, looking at the future: A case study in restructuring

Helen Ripple, Director of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center, and Associate Clinical Director, University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing

Purpose and plans for the minimum data set (Version 2.0)

Susan Nonemaker, Senior Program Analyst, Division of Long-Term Care Services, Health Standards and Quality Bureau, Health Care Financing Administration

The long-range nursing manpower demand project of the Greater Cleveland Hospital Association

Scott Sutorius, Vice President and Principal Investigator; Leah Shaikh, Project Manager; and Patricia Prescott, Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Nursing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
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Page 195
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Presentations Made to the Committee." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
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Page 196
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Hospitals and nursing homes are responding to changes in the health care system by modifying staffing levels and the mix of nursing personnel. But do these changes endanger the quality of patient care? Do nursing staff suffer increased rates of injury, illness, or stress because of changing workplace demands? These questions are addressed in Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes, a thorough and authoritative look at today's health care system that also takes a long-term view of staffing needs for nursing as the nation moves into the next century. The committee draws fundamental conclusions about the evolving role of nurses in hospitals and nursing homes and presents recommendations about staffing decisions, nursing training, measurement of quality, reimbursement, and other areas. The volume also discusses work-related injuries, violence toward and abuse of nursing staffs, and stress among nursing personnel--and examines whether these problems are related to staffing levels. Included is a readable overview of the underlying trends in health care that have given rise to urgent questions about nurse staffing: population changes, budget pressures, and the introduction of new technologies. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes provides a straightforward examination of complex and sensitive issues surround the role and value of nursing on our health care system.

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