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Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate? (1996)

Chapter: Appendix B: Liaison Panel

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Liaison Panel." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
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Appendix B Liaison Panel

Institute of Medicine (IOM) studies frequently rely on liaison panels to broaden the expertise of the committee, to inform interested and concerned parties about the study and its activities, and to provide a forum for discussion of the issues. In some studies, liaison panels may be given specific charges and asked to provide the committee with specific products. Other studies may never formally convene a meeting of the liaison panel, per se, but may work with the members of the panel informally and individually. Organizations nominate members of a liaison panel to speak on their behalf and to provide advice and assistance about the issues under consideration; because liaison panel members serve in an advisory capacity to the IOM formal committee, they may have known biases and conflicts of interest.

The IOM convened a liaison panel, comprising representatives of professional associations of nurses, related professional groups, hospitals and nursing homes, unions, and organizations that serve as advocates for nursing home residents. The panel met formally for a one-day meeting on August 1, 1994. It served in a consultative and information exchange capacity. Several members of the panel provided the committee with results of special surveys, specific informational material, and other background information from their organizations throughout the period of the study. They also helped to identify datasources, potential witnesses for the public hearing, and contacts for the committee's site visits.

Organizations represented on the liaison panel are listed below:

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Liaison Panel." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
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Organization

Representative

American Association of Colleges of Nursing

Polly Bednash

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

Melissa A. Fitzpatrick

American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging

Evelyn F. Munley

American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

Kathleen Bean

American Association of Retired Persons

Alan Buckingham

American Health Care Association

Mary Kay Ousley

American Hospital Association

Marjorie Beyers

American Licensed Practical Nurses Association

Paul M. Tendler

American Medical Directors Association

Rebecca Elon

American Nurses Association

Geraldine Marullo

American Nursing Assistants Association

Steve P. Gorsline

American Organization of Nurse Executives

Diana Weaver

Association for Federal, State and Municipal Employees

Constance Brown

Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations

Carole H. Patterson

National Association of Directors of Nursing Administration/LTC

Joan C. Warden

National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home Reform

Sue Harang

National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare

Martha M. Mohler

National Federation for Specialty Nursing Organizations

Connie Whittington

National League for Nursing

Eloise Balasco

Service Employees International Union

Rhonda Goode

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Liaison Panel." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
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Page 197
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Liaison Panel." Institute of Medicine. 1996. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes: Is It Adequate?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5151.
×
Page 198
Next: Appendix C: Separate Statement and Responses »
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Hospitals and nursing homes are responding to changes in the health care system by modifying staffing levels and the mix of nursing personnel. But do these changes endanger the quality of patient care? Do nursing staff suffer increased rates of injury, illness, or stress because of changing workplace demands? These questions are addressed in Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes, a thorough and authoritative look at today's health care system that also takes a long-term view of staffing needs for nursing as the nation moves into the next century. The committee draws fundamental conclusions about the evolving role of nurses in hospitals and nursing homes and presents recommendations about staffing decisions, nursing training, measurement of quality, reimbursement, and other areas. The volume also discusses work-related injuries, violence toward and abuse of nursing staffs, and stress among nursing personnel--and examines whether these problems are related to staffing levels. Included is a readable overview of the underlying trends in health care that have given rise to urgent questions about nurse staffing: population changes, budget pressures, and the introduction of new technologies. Nursing Staff in Hospitals and Nursing Homes provides a straightforward examination of complex and sensitive issues surround the role and value of nursing on our health care system.

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