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An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program (1996)

Chapter: APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information

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Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
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APPENDIX

C

Panel and Staff Biographic Information

PANEL

William F. Brinkman is vice president of physical sciences research for Lucent Technologies, formerly AT&T Bell Laboratories; he held the same position at AT&T Bell Laboratories. He was vice president of the Sandia National Laboratories in 1984-1987, director of the Chemical Physics Research Laboratory in 1981-1984, head of the Infrared Physics and Electronics Research Department of Bell Laboratories in 1972-1974, and a resident fellow at Oxford University in 1965-1966. Dr. Brinkman received his BS (1960), MS (1962), and PhD (1965) in physics from the University of Missouri at Columbia. He received an honorary DHL from the same institution in 1987. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Malcolm R. Beasley has been professor of applied physics and electrical engineering (by courtesy) at Stanford University since 1980; he was associate professor from 1974 to 1980. Dr. Beasley was a resident fellow of engineering and applied physics at Harvard University from 1967 to 1969 and then assistant professor and associate professor from 1969 to 1974. He received his BE (1962) in engineering physics and PhD (1968) in physics from Cornell University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Ralph J. Cicerone is professor in the earth system science department and dean of the School of Physical Sciences of the University of California, Irvine. Previously, he was a senior scientist and director of the Atmospheric Chemistry Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (1980-1989). Dr. Cicerone

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×

was also a research chemist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego (1979-1981), and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (1970-1978). Dr. Cicerone received his SB (1965) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his MS (1967) and PhD (1970) in electrical engineering and physics from the University of Illinois. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Meteorological Society, the American Geophysical Union, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

George B. Field is senior physicist at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and Robert W. Willson Professor of Applied Astronomy at Harvard University. Formerly, he was a professor of astronomy at Princeton and the University of California, Berkeley. He was director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics from 1973 to 1982. He received his BS in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1951 and his PhD in astronomy from Princeton in 1955. He has received the Joseph Henry medal of the Smithsonian Institution and several awards from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Scott E. Fraser is the Anna L. Rosen Professor of Biology and serves as the Director of the Biological Imaging Center of the Beckman Institute at Caltech. Previously, he was an assistant professor (1980-1986), associate professor (1986 to 1990) and full professor (1990-1991) at the University of California, Irvine, where he served as the chair of the Department of Physiology and Biophysics (1989-1991), and the assistant director of the Developmental Biology Center (1985-1991). He received his BS (1976) from Harvey Mudd College and his PhD (1979) from Johns Hopkins University. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Ernest G. Jaworski was distinguished science fellow with the Monsanto Company from 1970 to 1991. He has been an assistant biochemist (1949-1952), a research biochemist (1952-1954), a research group leader (1954-1960), a scientist (1960-1962), and a senior scientist (1962-1970). He received his BChem (1948) from the University of Minnesota and his MS (1950) and PhD (1952) in biochemistry from Oregon State University. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Lynn W. Jelinski is professor of engineering and director of the Center for Advanced Technology in Biotechnology at Cornell University. At AT&T Bell Laboratories, she was a staff fellow in biophysics (1978-1980), a member of the technical staff in chemistry (1980-1984), head of polymer chemistry (1984-1985), and head of biophysics (1985-1992). Dr. Jelinski received her BS (1971) from

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×

Duke University and her PhD (1976) in chemistry from the University of Hawaii. She was a fellow in chemistry at Johns Hopkins University in 1976-1977 and a fellow at the National Institutes of Health in 1977-1978.

A. Frank Mayadas is program manager at the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Before joining Sloan, he held various positions at IBM: member of the research staff of Watson Research Center (1965-1971), manager of the thin-film and metal group (1971-1975), manager of memory and storage research (1975-1977), manager of the technical planning staff (1977-1979), manager of storage systems and technology at the San Jose California Research Laboratory (1979-1981), director of technical planning and controls, director of the San Jose Research Laboratory, and director of the IBM Almaden Research Laboratory and Research Division vice president; IBM director and secretary, IBM Management Committee. Dr. Mayadas received his MetE (1961) from the Colorado School of Mines and his PhD (1966) from Cornell University. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

John R. Rice is W. Brooks Fortune Professor of Computer Sciences and professor of mathematics at Purdue University. He was a research fellow in mathematics at the National Bureau of Standards in 1959-1960 and a senior research mathematician at General Motors Research Laboratories in 1960-1964. Dr. Rice received his BS (1954) and MS (1956) from the Oklahoma State University and his PhD (1959) in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery.

J. David Roessner is professor at the School of Public Policy of the Georgia Institute of Technology and program manager for technology policy at SRI International. Before going to the institute, he held positions at Hewlett-Packard (1964-1965), the Bureau of Social Science Research, Inc. (1970-1973), the National Science Foundation (1977-1978), and the Solar Energy Research Institute (1978-1980). At the Georgia Institute of Technology, he has been acting director (1983-1984 and 1988-1989) and director (1990-1992) of the technology and science policy program, and interim director (1990-1992), associate director (1992-1995), and director of graduate studies (1994-1995) of the School of Public Policy. He has been with SRI International since September 1995. Dr. Roessner received BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from Brown University (1962) and Stanford University (1964), respectively. He received an MA (1967) and PhD (1970) in science, technology, and public policy from Case Western Reserve University.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×

Roland W. Schmitt is president emeritus of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and senior vice president (retired) of science and technology with General Electric. He has also been a member and chairman of the National Science Board, the governing body of the National Science Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, and a foreign associate of the Engineering Academy of Japan. Dr. Schmitt received his BA and BS (1947) and MA (1948) from the University of Texas and his PhD (1951) in physics from Rice University. He is also a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is currently chairman of the board of governors of the American Institute of Physics and chairman-elect of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents. He holds nine honorary doctorates and Rice University's Distinguished Alumni Award.

I.M. Singer is institute professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has held positions as Moore instructor of mathematics at MIT (1950-1952), assistant professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (1952-1954), visiting assistant professor at Columbia University (1954-1955), visiting member of the Institute of Advanced Study at Princeton University (1956), professor of mathematics at MIT (1956-1970), and Norbert Wiener professor (1970-1979), visiting professor (1977-1979) and professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley (1979-1983), Miller Professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, and John D. MacArthur professor of mathematics (1983-1987). Dr. Singer received his BS (1944) from the University of Michigan and his MS (1948) and PhD (1950) in mathematics from the University of Chicago. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Mathematical Society (vice president, 1970-1972), the American Physical Society, and the American Philosophical Society.

John C. Wright is professor at the Institute for Science Education of the University of Alabama at Huntsville. He has been an associate professor (1957-1959) and professor (1959-1961, chairman) at West Virginia Wesleyan College (1957-1959), an assistant program director for precollege programs at NSF (1964-1965), dean of the college of arts and sciences of Northern Arizona University (1965-1970), dean of the college of arts and sciences at W. University (1970-1974), vice chancellor for academic affairs of the W. Board of Regents (1974-1978), and president of the University of Alabama (1978-1988). Dr. Wright received his BS from the University of West Virginia and his PhD in chemistry from the University of Illinois.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×
PANEL STAFF

Lawrence E. McCray is director of the National Research Council's Policy Division and executive director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP). Dr. McCray held positions in the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Regulatory Council, and the Office of Management and Budget before coming to the Academies in 1981. He has directed academy studies in carcinogenic risk assessment, export controls, nuclear winter, and federal science budgeting. A Fulbright scholar in 1968, he received the Schattschneider Award in 1972 from the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation in American government and politics. In 1987, he received the National Research Council Staff Award.

Deborah D. Stine is study director and associate director of COSEPUP. Dr. Stine has been working on various projects throughout the academy complex since 1989. She received a National Research Council group award for her first study, for COSEPUP, on policy implications of greenhouse warming, and a Commission on Life Sciences staff citation for her work in risk assessment and management. She holds a bachelor's degree in mechanical and environmental engineering from the University of California, Irvine, an MBA, and a PhD in public administration, specializing in policy analysis, from American University. She received an International Mitchell Prize Young Scholar's Award for her personal research in International Environmental Decisionmaking. Prior to joining the Academies, she worked for the State of Texas and the Chemical Manufacturers Association.

Scott T. Weidman is senior program office for this study and also serves as director of the National Research Council's Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. Dr. Weidman joined the National Research Council in 1989 with the Board on Mathematical Sciences and moved in 1992 to the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. In late 1995, he assumed his current position directing a new board that will provide annual technical assessments of the R&D performed at the Army Research Laboratory. He earned bachelor's degrees in mathematics and materials science from Northwestern University and an MS and a PhD in applied mathematics from the University of Virginia. Before joining the National Research Council, Dr. Weidman worked for General Electric Corp., General Accident Insurance Co., Exxon Research and Engineering Co., and MRJ, Inc.

Patrick P. Sevcik is the program assistant for the Panel and COSEPUP. Before his work at the National Research Council, Mr. Sevcik was an assistant program officer with the International Republican Institute (IRI) from 1990 to 1993 working primarily in Central and Eastern Europe. He has held positions at the White

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×

House in the Office of Political Affairs (1989-1990) and on Capitol Hill (1987-1988) in the office of Representative John DioGuardi (R-NY). During this time, Mr. Sevcik also held concurrent positions in several Slovak-American organizations. Mr. Sevcik holds a BA in international affairs, with an emphasis on Soviet and Eastern European studies, from the George Washington University. He has also studied Russian language and culture at the Leningrad Polytechnic Institute in former Leningrad, USSR.

Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×
Page 54
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX C: Panel and Staff Biographic Information." National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 1996. An Assessment of the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Centers Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5401.
×
Page 57
Next: APPENDIX D: Excerpts from Visiting-Committee Reports on the Science and Technology Centers »
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The National Science Foundation requested that the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy of the NAS, the NAE, and the IOM form a panel to evaluate the accomplishments of the NSF Science and Technology Centers program (not individual centers) against its goals in research, education, and knowledge transfer. This report is the result of the work of the panel charged with that effort, and provides recommendations for moving forward.

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