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Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Academy of Sciences. 1998. Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5787.
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Credits

Cover, title page, pages x and 1. Earth view from space, NASA.

Cover, title page, and page 35: Grand Canyon, Photodisk.

Cover, title page, and page vi: Fossil fish, Photodisk.

Cover, title page, and page 3: Coral reef, Stephen Fink/Corbis.

Cover and title page: Leonardo da Vinci.

Cover and page 55: Nautilus fossil, NAP Image Archives.

page iv: Entrance to National Academy of Sciences Building, Carol M. Highsmith, photographer.

page v: Marble seal of the National Academy of Sciences, David Patterson, photographer.

page 2: Rain forest, Stephen Dalton, photographer, © Oxford Scientific Films.

page 3: Insert, left: Bass, Dallas Aquarium, © The National Audubon Society Collection.

page 3: Insert, right: Fossil fish (Priscacara oxyprion), © E. R. Degginger.

page 4: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration, adapted from Essential Cell Biology, Garland Publishing, Inc.

page 6: Balcones Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, © 1997 by Phyllis Janik.

page 8: Archaeopteryx cast, Smithsonian Museum, Washington, DC, James Amos/Corbis.

page 10: Galapagos Islands view from space, NASA.

pages 11 and 19: Galapagos finch, Galen Rowell/Corbis.

pages 12 and 27: Young stars, Hubble Space Telescope, NASA.

page 13: Charles Darwin, Corbis-Bettmann.

page 13: Alfred Russel Wallace, Library of Congress.

page 13: Gregor Mendel, Corbis-Bettmann.

page 15: Ant in amber, David Grimaldi, American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York.

page 17: Lacewing graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 17: Lacewing photograph, Catherine and Maurice Tauber, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.

page 18: Whale ancestors, drawings by N. Haver, © Sinauer Associates, Inc.

page 20: Skulls, drawings by Darwen Hennings, © Wadsworth Publishing Company.

page 21: Wasp and caterpillar, James H. Tumlinson, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

page 23: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 26: Armillary sphere, Library of Congress.

page 28: Nicolaus Copernicus, Corbis-Bettmann.

page 28: Johannes Kepler, Library of Congress.

page 28: Galileo Galilei, Library of Congress/Corbis.

page 28: Isaac Newton, Library of Congress.

page 28:18th century view of the universe, Corbis-Bettmann.

page 30: Tropical forest with crane, Smithsonian Institution.

page 31: Leafnosed bat, Joe McDonald/Corbis.

page 32: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 33: Sedimentary rocks, David McConnell, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio.

page 34: Fossil record, graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration, derived from an illustration developed by Ken Miller, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.

page 36: Armadillo, Joe McDonald/Corbis.

page 36: Fossil, courtesy of Raymond T. Rye, Smithsonian Institution.

page 36: Stromatolites, courtesy of Embassy of Australia.

page 36-37: Timeline graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration, adapted from The Book of Life, W.W. Norton, New York, New York.

page 38: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration, adapted from Essential Cell Biology, Garland Publishing, Inc.

page 39: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration, adapted from From So Simple a Beginning, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York, New York.

page 41: Plate tectonics, graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration, adapted from Astronomy Today, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

page 44: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Academy of Sciences. 1998. Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5787.
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page 46: Student at Montgomery Blair High School, Silver Spring, Maryland, Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

page 49: Students at Piney Branch Elementary School, Takoma Park, Maryland, Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

page 51: Students at Eastern Middle School, Silver Spring, Maryland, Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

page 54: Trilobite, David McGrath, photographer, © Photo Archives, Denver Museum of Natural History.

page 60: Students and teacher, Milton Hershey School, Hershey, PA, © Blair Seitz.

page 61: Student at Piney Branch Elementary School, Takoma Park, Maryland, Robert Allen Strawn, photographer.

page 64: Draft Growth-of-Understanding Map. Benchmark for Science Literacy, AAAS.

page 71: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 72: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 73: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 83: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 84: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 89: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 102: Graphic by Leigh Coriale Design and Illustration.

page 104: Books, © TSM/Tom Stewart 1995.

page 105: Keyboard, NAP Image Archives.

Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Academy of Sciences. 1998. Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5787.
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Page 139
Suggested Citation:"Credits." National Academy of Sciences. 1998. Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5787.
×
Page 140
Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science Get This Book
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Today many school students are shielded from one of the most important concepts in modern science: evolution. In engaging and conversational style, Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science provides a well-structured framework for understanding and teaching evolution.

Written for teachers, parents, and community officials as well as scientists and educators, this book describes how evolution reveals both the great diversity and similarity among the Earth's organisms; it explores how scientists approach the question of evolution; and it illustrates the nature of science as a way of knowing about the natural world. In addition, the book provides answers to frequently asked questions to help readers understand many of the issues and misconceptions about evolution.

The book includes sample activities for teaching about evolution and the nature of science. For example, the book includes activities that investigate fossil footprints and population growth that teachers of science can use to introduce principles of evolution. Background information, materials, and step-by-step presentations are provided for each activity. In addition, this volume:

  • Presents the evidence for evolution, including how evolution can be observed today.
  • Explains the nature of science through a variety of examples.
  • Describes how science differs from other human endeavors and why evolution is one of the best avenues for helping students understand this distinction.
  • Answers frequently asked questions about evolution.

Teaching About Evolution and the Nature of Science builds on the 1996 National Science Education Standards released by the National Research Council--and offers detailed guidance on how to evaluate and choose instructional materials that support the standards.

Comprehensive and practical, this book brings one of today's educational challenges into focus in a balanced and reasoned discussion. It will be of special interest to teachers of science, school administrators, and interested members of the community.

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