National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035

Becoming a 21st-Century Force

VOLUME 6 Platforms

Panel on Platforms

Committee on Technology for Future Naval Forces

Naval Studies Board

Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications

National Research Council

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.
1997

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee consisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce Alberts is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. William A. Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Kenneth I. Shine is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy's purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce Alberts and Dr. William A. Wulf are chairman and vice chairman, respectively, of the National Research Council.

This work was performed under Department of the Navy Contract N00014-96-D-0169/0001 issued by the Office of Naval Research under contract authority NR 201-124. However, the content does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the Department of the Navy or the government, and no official endorsement should be inferred.

The United States Government has at least a royalty-free, nonexclusive, and irrevocable license throughout the world for government purposes to publish, translate, reproduce, deliver, perform, and dispose of all or any of this work, and to authorize others so to do.

Copyright 1997 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Copies available from:

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2101 Constitution Avenue,

N.W. Washington, D.C. 20418

Printed in the United States of America

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

PANEL ON PLATFORMS

GERALD A. CANN,

Raytheon Company,

Chair

WILLIAM D. O'NEIL,

Center for Naval Analyses,

Vice Chair

STEVEN D. ADAMS,

Bath Iron Works Corporation

JAMES P. BROOKS,

Litton/Ingalls Shipbuilding, Inc.

ROY R. BUEHLER,

Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems

DANIEL L. COOPER,

Wyomissing, Pennsylvania

RICHARD M. DUNLEAVY,

Virginia Beach, Virginia

STANLEY F. DUNN,

Florida Atlantic University

ROBERT H. GORMLEY,

The Oceanus Company

JAMES C. HAY,

Potomac, Maryland

CHARLES F. HORNE III,

Mount Pleasant, South Carolina

ANN R. KARAGOZIAN,

University of California at Los Angeles

RONALD K. KISS,

Rockville, Maryland

THOMAS C. MALONEY,

General Dynamics

DAVID W. McCALL,

Far Hills, New Jersey

IRWIN MENDELSON,

Singer Island, Florida

JOSEPH METCALF III,

Washington, D.C.

RICHARDS T. MILLER,

Annapolis, Maryland

MICHAEL L. POWELL,

Newport News Shipbuilding, Inc.

JAMES M. SINNETT,

McDonnell Douglas Corporation

KEITH A. SMITH,

Vienna, Virginia

JAMES J. TURNER, SR.,

Alexandria, Virginia

Invited Participant

MICHAEL T. BOYCE,

Boeing Defense and Space Group

Navy Liaison Representatives

CAPT JOHN McGILLVRAY, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N863J

CDR DENNIS MURPHY, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N87C1

LCDR PETE McSHEA, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N88W3

Consultants

LEE M. HUNT

SIDNEY G. REED, JR.

JAMES G. WILSON

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

Staff

RONALD D. TAYLOR, Director,

Naval Studies Board

PETER W. ROONEY, Program Officer

SUSAN G. CAMPBELL, Administrative Assistant

MARY G. GORDON, Information Officer

CHRISTOPHER A. HANNA, Project Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

COMMITTEE ON TECHNOLOGY FOR FUTURE NAVAL FORCES

DAVID R. HEEBNER,

Science Applications International Corporation

(retired), Study Director

ALBERT J. BACIOCCO, JR.,

The Baciocco Group, Inc.

ALAN BERMAN,

Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University

NORMAN E. BETAQUE,

Logistics Management Institute

GERALD A. CANN,

Raytheon Company

GEORGE F. CARRIER,

Harvard University

SEYMOUR J. DEITCHMAN,

Institute for Defense Analyses (retired)

ALEXANDER FLAX,

Potomac, Maryland

WILLIAM J. MORAN,

Redwood City, California

ROBERT J. MURRAY,

Center for Naval Analyses

ROBERT B. OAKLEY,

National Defense University

JOSEPH B. REAGAN,

Saratoga, California

VINCENT VITTO,

Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Navy Liaison Representatives

RADM JOHN W. CRAINE, JR., USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N81 (as of July 4, 1996)

VADM THOMAS B. FARGO, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N81 (through July 3, 1996)

RADM RICHARD A. RIDDELL, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N91

CDR DOUGLASS BIESEL, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N812C1

PAUL G. BLATCH,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N911T1

Marine Corps Liaison Representative

LtGen PAUL K. VAN RIPER, USMC,

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

Consultants

LEE M. HUNT

SIDNEY G. REED, JR.

JAMES G. WILSON

Staff

RONALD D. TAYLOR, Director,

Naval Studies Board

PETER W. ROONEY, Program Officer

SUSAN G. CAMPBELL, Administrative Assistant

MARY G. GORDON, Information Officer

CHRISTOPHER A. HANNA, Project Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

NAVAL STUDIES BOARD

DAVID R. HEEBNER,

Science Applications International Corporation

(retired), Chair

GEORGE M. WHITESIDES,

Harvard University,

Vice Chair

ALBERT J. BACIOCCO, JR.,

The Baciocco Group, Inc.

ALAN BERMAN,

Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University

NORMAN E. BETAQUE,

Logistics Management Institute

NORVAL L. BROOME,

Mitre Corporation

GERALD A. CANN,

Raytheon Company

SEYMOUR J. DEITCHMAN,

Institute for Defense Analyses

(retired), Special Advisor

ANTHONY J. DeMARIA,

DeMaria ElectroOptics Systems, Inc.

JOHN F. EGAN,

Lockheed Martin Corporation

ROBERT HUMMEL,

Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University

DAVID W. McCALL,

Far Hills, New Jersey

ROBERT J. MURRAY,

Center for Naval Analyses

ROBERT B. OAKLEY,

National Defense University

WILLIAM J. PHILLIPS,

Northstar Associates, Inc.

MARA G. PRENTISS,

Jefferson Laboratory, Harvard University

HERBERT RABIN,

University of Maryland

JULIE JCH RYAN,

Booz, Allen and Hamilton

HARRISON SHULL,

Monterey, California

KEITH A. SMITH,

Vienna, Virginia

ROBERT C. SPINDEL,

Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington

DAVID L. STANFORD,

Science Applications International Corporation

H. GREGORY TORNATORE,

Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University

J. PACE VanDEVENDER,

Prosperity Institute

VINCENT VITTO,

Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

BRUCE WALD,

Arlington Education Consultants

Navy Liaison Representatives

RADM JOHN W. CRAINE, JR., USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N81 (as of July 4, 1996)

VADM THOMAS B. FARGO, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N81 (through July 3, 1996)

RADM RICHARD A. RIDDELL, USN,

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, N91

RONALD N. KOSTOFF,

Office of Naval Research

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

Marine Corps Liaison Representative

LtGen PAUL K. VAN RIPER, USMC,

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

RONALD D. TAYLOR, Director

PETER W. ROONEY, Program Officer

SUSAN G. CAMPBELL, Administrative Assistant

MARY G. GORDON, Information Officer

CHRISTOPHER A. HANNA, Project Assistant

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

COMMISSION ON PHYSICAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICS, AND APPLICATIONS

ROBERT J. HERMANN,

United Technologies Corporation,

Co-Chair

W. CARL LINEBERGER,

University of Colorado,

Co-Chair

PETER M. BANKS,

Environmental Research Institute of Michigan

LAWRENCE D. BROWN,

University of Pennsylvania

RONALD G. DOUGLAS,

Texas A&M University

JOHN E. ESTES,

University of California at Santa Barbara

L. LOUIS HEGEDUS,

Elf Atochem North America, Inc.

JOHN E. HOPCROFT,

Cornell University

RHONDA J. HUGHES,

Bryn Mawr College

SHIRLEY A. JACKSON, U.S.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission

KENNETH H. KELLER,

University of Minnesota

KENNETH I. KELLERMANN,

National Radio Astronomy Observatory

MARGARET G. KIVELSON,

University of California at Los Angeles

DANIEL KLEPPNER,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

JOHN KREICK,

Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company

MARSHA I. LESTER,

University of Pennsylvania

THOMAS A. PRINCE,

California Institute of Technology

NICHOLAS P. SAMIOS,

Brookhaven National Laboratory

L.E. SCRIVEN,

University of Minnesota

SHMUEL WINOGRAD, IBM T.J.

Watson Research Center

CHARLES A. ZRAKET,

Mitre Corporation

(retired)

NORMAN METZGER, Executive Director

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

Preface

This report is part of the nine-volume series entitled Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035: Becoming a 21st-Century Force. The series is the product of an 18-month study requested by the Chief of Naval Operations. To carry out this study, eight technical panels were organized under the Committee on Technology for Future Naval Forces to examine all of the specific technical areas called out in the terms of reference.

On November 28, 1995, the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) requested that the National Research Council initiate, through its Naval Studies Board, a thorough examination of the impact of advancing technology on the form and capability of the naval forces to the year 2035. The terms of reference of the study specifically asked for an identification of "present and emerging technologies that relate to the full breadth of Navy and Marine Corps mission capabilities," with specific attention to "(1) information warfare, electronic warfare, and the use of surveillance assets; (2) mine warfare and submarine warfare; (3) Navy and Marine Corps weaponry in the context of effectiveness on target; [and] (4) issues in caring for and maximizing effectiveness of Navy and Marine Corps human resources." Ten specific technical areas were identified to which attention should be broadly directed. The CNO's letter of request with the full terms of reference is given in Appendix A of this report.

The Panel on Platforms was constituted to address technology issues related to military platforms—surface, air, and subsurface—that will support future Navy and Marine Corps missions. As part of its effort, particular attention was directed to item 6 of the terms of reference:

Navy and Marine Corps platforms, including propulsion systems, should be evaluated for suitability to future missions and operating environments. For

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×

example, compliance with environmental issues is becoming increasingly expensive for the naval service and affects operations. The review should take known issues into account and anticipate those likely to affect the Navy and Marine Corps in the future.

The terms of reference for the study charged the Panel on Platforms with examining how new directions in technology development can be brought to bear to enhance the effectiveness of future naval platforms, taking note of recent changes in the national security environment (threat, tasking, resources) and those that can be expected to occur in the future. The panel realized that (1) resource availability will be the controlling factor; (2) the threat will remain diffuse in origin and broad in scope, with a consequent need for a viable, up-to-date naval force structure; and (3) the Navy and Marine Corps missions in the uncertain future will continue to be defined broadly as the application of sea power in the national interest.

Panel membership included expertise in systems engineering; naval architecture; electrical and mechanical engineering; propulsion engineering; ship, aircraft, and submarine design and manufacturing; large enterprise management; and direct operational experience. The panel held 10 meetings over the course of a year, during which it received input from scientists, engineers, and decision-makers from government, industry, and academia with specialized expertise in platform technologies.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1997. Technology for the United States Navy and Marine Corps, 2000-2035 Becoming a 21st-Century Force: Volume 6: Platforms. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5839.
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