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Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris (1997)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5958.
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APPENDIX B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Frederick H.Hauck (chair), is president and chief executive officer of AXA Space (formerly INTEC), a company that specializes in providing insurance for launching and operating space systems. Before coming to AXA Space, Mr. Hauck was director of the Navy Space Systems Division in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Before that, Mr. Hauck was a test pilot and a member of the astronaut corps. As an astronaut, he flew in space three times and was commander of the first shuttle flight after the Challenger accident. He has been a member or chair of numerous panels and advisory groups on national and international space activities. Mr. Hauck has received two Defense Distinguished Service Medals, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Distinguished Service Medal, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Presidential Cost Saving Commendation, and many other honors and awards. He holds degrees in physics and nuclear engineering from Tufts University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Kyle T.Alfriend is a professor and head of the Aerospace Engineering Department at Texas A&M University. Previously, he headed research centers and laboratories at the Naval Postgraduate School, the General Research Corporation, and the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Alfriend is a recognized expert in astrodynamics and has chaired the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Astrodynamics Technical Committee. He has worked on orbital debris for several years and has developed algorithms both for estimating the probability of collisions between space objects and for estimating the space object population from sample radar measurements. He is a fellow of the AIAA and the American Astronautical Society. Dr. Alfriend holds degrees in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and from Stanford University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5958.
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Dale B.Atkinson is a consultant on survivability issues. For 34 years, he worked for the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and was one of the founders of the aircraft survivability discipline. He retired from the Office of the Secretary of Defense in 1992. Before working on aircraft survivability, he was involved in some of the first attempts by the U.S. Air Force to protect spacecraft from meteoroids. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA and the recipient of the first AIAA Survivability Award. Mr. Atkinson holds degrees in aeronautical engineering and national resources from the University of Kansas and George Washington University.

Dale R.Atkinson is chief executive officer of POD Associates, Inc., which specializes in impact physics analyses and impact survivability and safety for spacecraft, aircraft, vehicles, and ships. Mr. Atkinson has worked on various aspects of modeling, analyzing, and monitoring the meteoroid and debris environments, their effects on systems, and potential mitigation techniques. He has also worked on analyzing the results from the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft, advised the White House National Space Council on orbital debris from 1991 to 1993, was the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization’s expert on orbital debris and micrometeoroid survivability technologies, and served as a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Space Debris and the Committee on Space Station Meteoroid/Debris Risk Management. Mr. Atkinson holds degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Arizona.

G.Taft DeVere is an analyst at the Space Warfare Center. Until January 1997, he was a member of the technical staff at SenCom Corporation, where he was technical lead for U.S. Department of Defense orbital debris data collection campaigns. Previously, Mr. DeVere worked at Teledyne Brown Engineering and Nichols Research Corporation, where he led studies of the Space Surveillance Network’s sensors, command center, and debris analysis. Before that, he was a captain in the U.S. Air Force and worked on a wide variety of space observation and analysis activities. He holds degrees in physics and space operations from the University of Massachusetts and from Webster University.

Donald H.Emero is a retired vice president of Rockwell’s Space Systems Division. Mr. Emero held a variety of positions in the space shuttle program and was the chief engineer for space shuttle orbiter production and operations from 1989 to 1993. In this position, he headed numerous teams to resolve complex problems with the shuttle. Mr. Emero has been awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal and the National Management Association’s Gold Knight of Management, and he is an associate fellow of the AIAA. Mr. Emero holds two degrees in civil engineering from the University of Massachusetts.

George J.Gleghorn is a retired vice president and chief engineer of TRW’s Space and Technology Group. He was the chair of the NRC Committee on Space

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5958.
×

Debris and the Committee on Space Station Meteoroid/Debris Risk Management. He is also a member of NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. Dr. Gleghorn is a fellow of the AIAA and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for his “contributions to the development of advanced scientific and communications spacecraft and the technology of spacecraft systems engineering.” He holds degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado and the California Institute of Technology.

Darren S.McKnight is vice president of Titan Research and Technology. He has co-authored two books and written more than 40 technical articles on orbital debris and was the founder and editor of a newsletter, the Orbital Debris Monitor. Dr. McKnight previously worked at Logicon RDA and Kaman Sciences Corporation on kinetic energy weapons lethality, simulation, orbital debris, and space environmental effects. Before that, he was a professor of physics at the Air Force Academy. Dr. McKnight holds degrees in engineering from the University of New Mexico, the Air Force Academy, and the University of Colorado.

William P.Schonberg is professor and chair of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Dr. Schonberg has published more than 30 journal articles and has presented more than 35 papers on shock physics, hypervelocity impacts, and penetration mechanics. The results of his research have been applied to a wide variety of engineering problems, most notably the development of orbital debris protection systems for spacecraft—including the International Space Station—in low Earth orbit. Dr. Schonberg holds degrees in civil engineering from Princeton University and Northwestern University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5958.
×
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5958.
×
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1997. Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/5958.
×
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The space shuttle orbiter has already been struck many times by small meteoroids and orbital debris, but it has not been damaged severely. There is a real risk, however, that a meteoroid or debris impact could one day force the crew to abort a mission or might result in loss of life or loss of the shuttle itself. Protecting the Space Shuttle from Meteoroids and Orbital Debris assesses the magnitude of the problem and suggests changes that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration can make to reduce the risk to the shuttle and its crew. December

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