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Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline (1998)

Chapter: F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984

« Previous: E Methodological Problems Associated with Laboratory Values and Food Composition Data for B Vitamins
Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×

F
Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984

TABLE F-1 Dietary Intake of B Vitamins in Free-Living Older Adults (aged ≥ 60 y) Who Were Not Taking Vitamin Supplements, Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984

Intake of B Vitamins by Gender

Dietary Intake

Sample Size

Mean

Standard Deviation

5th Percentile

Thiamin (mg)

Males

168

1.5

0.5

0.9

Females

283

1.2

0.4

0.7

Riboflavin (mg)

Males

169

2.0

0.7

1.0

Females

283

1.6

0.6

0.8

Niacin (mg)

Males

168

21.6

6.7

12.5

Females

283

17.9

5.9

10.3

Vitamin B6 (mg)

Males

170

1.3

0.6

0.6

Females

281

1.1

0.4

0.5

Folate (µg)

Males

189

273

121

119

Females

344

231

94

116

Vitamin B12 (µg)

Males

171

4.7

4.4

1.5

Females

280

4.0

4.9

1.0

SOURCE: Adapted from Appendixes C.5.21–C.5.26 in Hartz SC, Russell RM, Rosenberg IH. 1992. Nutrition in the Elderly. The Boston Nutritional Status Survey. London: Smith-Gordon.

Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×

10th Percentile

25th Percentile

50th Percentile

75th Percentile

90th Percentile

95th Percentile

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.8

2.2

2.5

0.8

0.9

1.1

1.3

1.7

1.9

1.2

1.5

1.9

2.4

2.9

3.4

1.0

1.2

1.5

1.8

2.3

2.8

13.8

16.0

21.0

25.4

30.1

33.5

11.2

14.3

16.9

20.5

26.2

28.7

0.7

0.8

1.2

1.6

2.1

2.4

0.6

0.7

1.0

1.3

1.6

1.8

139

196

254

328

425

528

140

167

208

272

356

428

1.7

2.4

3.4

5.8

8.4

10.9

1.2

1.8

2.6

3.8

7.6

12.9

Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×

TABLE F-2 Intake of B Vitamins in Free-Living Older Adults (aged ≥ 60 y) Who Were Taking Vitamin Supplements, Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984

 

Sample Size

Mean

Standard Deviation

5th Percentile

Thiamin (mg)

Males

Dietary intake

69

1.5

0.5

0.9

Supplement intake

69

9.5

18.3

0.5

Total intake

69

11.0

18.3

1.7

Females

Dietary intake

166

1.2

0.5

0.7

Supplement intake

166

11.7

24.4

0.5

Total intake

166

13.0

24.5

1.6

Riboflavin (mg)

Males

Dietary intake

68

2.0

0.9

1.2

Supplement intake

68

5.5

9.9

0.4

Total intake

68

7.5

9.8

1.8

Females

Dietary intake

166

1.6

0.6

0.9

Supplement intake

166

10.0

21.8

0.5

Total intake

166

11.6

21.8

2.0

Vitamin B6 (mg)

Males

Dietary intake

67

1.5

0.7

0.6

Supplement intake

67

9.8

21.3

0.3

Total intake

67

11.3

21.2

1.6

Females

Dietary intake

168

1.2

0.6

0.4

Supplement intake

168

18.9

58.8

0.7

Total intake

168

20.1

58.9

1.7

Niacin (mg)

Males

Dietary intake

69

22.5

7.4

11.3

Supplement intake

69

46.7

73.5

1.2

Total intake

69

69.2

75.4

22.3

Females

Dietary intake

166

17.9

6.2

10.0

Supplement intake

166

60.3

75.6

5.3

Total intake

166

78.2

75.8

23.7

Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×

10th Percentile

25th Percentile

50th Percentile

75th Percentile

90th Percentile

95th Percentile

1.0

1.2

1.5

1.7

2.1

2.6

0.5

1.2

2.4

10.0

20.0

55.0

1.9

2.7

4.2

11.5

22.1

55.9

0.8

0.9

1.1

1.4

1.9

2.3

1.0

1.2

3.2

10.0

30.0

55.0

1.9

2.6

4.4

11.4

31.1

56.0

1.2

1.5

2.0

2.3

2.7

3.3

0.6

1.4

1.9

7.4

10.5

15.0

2.1

3.2

4.4

9.9

13.0

17.1

1.1

1.2

1.5

1.8

2.4

2.6

1.0

1.4

2.9

10.0

20.0

34.5

2.4

2.9

5.2

11.5

21.5

35.3

0.8

1.0

1.3

1.9

2.3

2.8

0.7

2.0

2.2

5.0

31.3

50.0

2.4

3.1

4.3

6.1

31.9

51.9

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.2

0.8

2.0

2.2

5.0

50.0

55.3

2.1

2.8

4.1

7.2

51.2

57.2

13.7

18.0

21.6

25.9

29.9

39.1

6.7

16.0

20.0

51.8

100.0

100.0

25.3

35.9

48.8

74.4

121.4

137.5

10.9

13.3

16.4

22.2

25.8

28.7

11.5

16.0

30.0

100.0

120.0

160.0

26.5

31.9

48.1

111.5

132.3

178.7

Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×

 

Sample Size

Mean

Standard Deviation

5th Percentile

Vitamin B12 (µg)

Males

Dietary intake

66

5.4

6.3

1.5

Supplement intake

66

17.4

52.0

1.5

Total intake

66

22.8

52.4

3.9

Females

Dietary intake

169

3.7

3.7

1.1

Supplement intake

169

31.0

105.5

1.5

Total intake

169

34.7

105.8

4.1

Folate (µg)

Males

Dietary intake

48

296

152

140

Supplement intake

48

586

645

120

Total intake

48

882

696

312

Females

Dietary intake

105

260

120

121

Supplement intake

105

484

517

120

Total intake

105

744

567

311

 

SOURCE: Adapted from Appendixes C.5.21–C.5.26 in Hartz SC, Russell RM, Rosenberg IH. 1992. Nutrition in the Elderly. The Boston Nutritional Status Survey. London: Smith-Gordon.

Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×

10th Percentile

25th Percentile

50th Percentile

75th Percentile

90th Percentile

95th Percentile

1.8

2.3

3.6

6.7

10.5

11.8

1.7

3.0

5.0

7.0

24.0

77.0

4.1

6.8

9.7

15.1

71.8

83.1

1.3

1.9

2.7

4.0

6.2

8.7

2.3

3.0

6.0

12.0

66.7

100.0

4.8

6.2

9.0

14.9

70.0

106.3

158

199

259

327

474

640

133

300

400

400

1,400

2,400

385

581

666

918

1,569

2,667

137

178

238

316

410

520

133

267

400

400

800

1,000

340

530

628

809

1,105

1,349

Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×
Page 460
Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×
Page 461
Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×
Page 462
Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×
Page 463
Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×
Page 464
Suggested Citation:"F Dietary Intake Data from the Boston Nutritional Status Survey, 1981–1984." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6015.
×
Page 465
Next: G Dietary Intake Data from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII), 1994–1995 »
Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline Get This Book
×

Since 1941, Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) has been recognized as the most authoritative source of information on nutrient levels for healthy people. Since publication of the 10th edition in 1989, there has been rising awareness of the impact of nutrition on chronic disease. In light of new research findings and a growing public focus on nutrition and health, the expert panel responsible for formulation RDAs reviewed and expanded its approach--the result: Dietary Reference Intakes.

This new series of references greatly extends the scope and application of previous nutrient guidelines. For each nutrient the book presents what is known about how the nutrient functions in the human body, what the best method is to determine its requirements, which factors (caffeine or exercise, for example) may affect how it works, and how the nutrient may be related to chronic disease.

This volume of the series presents information about thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, biotin, and choline.

Based on analysis of nutrient metabolism in humans and data on intakes in the U.S. population, the committee recommends intakes for each age group--from the first days of life through childhood, sexual maturity, midlife, and the later years. Recommendations for pregnancy and lactation also are made, and the book identifies when intake of a nutrient may be too much. Representing a new paradigm for the nutrition community, Dietary Reference Intakes encompasses:

  • Estimated Average Requirements (EARs). These are used to set Recommended Dietary Allowances.
  • Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs). Intakes that meet the RDA are likely to meet the nutrient requirement of nearly all individuals in a life-stage and gender group.
  • Adequate Intakes (AIs). These are used instead of RDAs when an EAR cannot be calculated. Both the RDA and the AI may be used as goals for individual intake.
  • Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs). Intakes below the UL are unlikely to pose risks of adverse health effects in healthy people.

This new framework encompasses both essential nutrients and other food components thought to pay a role in health, such as dietary fiber. It incorporates functional endpoints and examines the relationship between dose and response in determining adequacy and the hazards of excess intake for each nutrient.

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