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Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors: A Priority Assessment (1998)

Chapter: Appendix E: Biographies of Workshop Speakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographies of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors: A Priority Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6035.
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E
Biographies of Workshop Speakers

Greg Cosma, Ph.D., is assistant professor of toxicology in the Department of Environmental Health at Colorado State University. Dr. Cosma received his B.S. degree from the University of Illinois, and his M.S./Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Kansas. Following two postdoctoral fellowships at the National Cancer Institute in cellular/molecular carcinogenesis, his research has focused on the development of cancer biomarkers of exposures and susceptibility to environmental agents. He has worked closely with epidemiologists in field studies of environmentally and occupationally exposed individuals and has published numerous reports of gene-environment relationships. More recently, Dr. Cosma has explored the role of reactive oxygen species in environmental carcinogenesis and the development of biomarkers of oxidative stress. He has served on several review panels for federal cancer programs, including those of the Department of Energy, NIEHS, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

S. Katharine Hammond, Ph.D., is associate professor of environmental health sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health. She received her B.A. from Oberlin College, her Ph.D. in chemistry from Brandeis University, and her M.S. in environmental health sciences from the Harvard School of Public Health, where she holds an appointment as visiting lecturer in industrial hygiene. Her research has focused on assessing human exposure to complex mixtures for epidemiological studies. Among the exposures she has evaluated are those associated with work in the semiconductor industry, diesel exhaust, and environmental tobacco smoke. She served as a consultant to the EPA's Scientific Advisory Board in its review of environmental tobacco smoke; that review culminated in the publication of Respiratory Health Effects of Pas-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographies of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors: A Priority Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6035.
×

sive Smoking: Lung Cancer and Other Disorders. She is currently on the Acrylonitrile Advisory Panel for the National Cancer Institute.

Kenneth S. Korach, Ph.D., is the scientific program director of the Environmental Diseases and Medicine Program, chief of the Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, and chief of the Receptor Biology Section at the NIEHS. He received his Ph.D. in endocrinology from the Medical College of Georgia in 1974. From 1974 to 1976, Dr. Korach was a postdoctoral biological chemistry research fellow at Harvard Medical School in the laboratory of the late Professor Lewis Engel. He also received a Ford research fellowship while at Harvard. In 1976 Dr. Korach joined NIEHS, where he has headed a research group investigating the basic mechanisms of estrogen hormone action in the reproductive tract and bone tissues, seeking to understand how hormonally active environmental estrogens influence physiological processes. Dr. Korach holds adjunct professorships in biochemistry at North Carolina State University and in pharmacology at the University of North Carolina Medical School. He is a recipient of the NIH outstanding performance awards, the NIH merit awards, Medical College of Georgia distinguished alumnus award, and the Edwin B. Atwood award from the Endocrine Society.

Shiriki Kumanyika, Ph.D., is professor and head of the Department of Human Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is also a professor of epidemiology in the UIC School of Public Health and the nutrition chief of service for the University of Illinois Hospital Medical Center. Dr. Kumanyika has previously held faculty positions at Cornell, Johns Hopkins, and Penn State universities. She holds a Ph.D. in human nutrition from Cornell University and master's degrees in public health (Johns Hopkins University) and social work (Columbia University) and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Syracuse University. Dr. Kumanyika was a member of the IOM Committee on Legal and Ethical Issues in the Inclusion of Women in Clinical Studies. She was a member of the ORWH task forces on Opportunities for Research in Women's Health and Women in Biomedical Careers; was cochair of the Task Force on Recruitment and Retention of Women in Clinical Studies; and is an advisor to the NIH Women's Health Initiative, a very large, long-term national study of women's health. Dr. Kumanyika is actively involved in research related to nutrition epidemiology, obesity, and the health of minority populations, older populations, and women. She is the author or co-author of more than 100 publications and monographs.

Bill L. Lasley, Ph.D., is professor of environmental health and reproduction at the University of California at Davis. He received his Ph.D. from U.C. Davis and postdoctoral training at the U.C. at San Diego. Dr. Lasley was a research endocrinologist at the San Diego Zoo from 1975 until 1986, when he relocated to U.C. Davis. He has a joint appointment in the School of Veterinary Medicine, in the Department of Population Health and Reproduction and the School of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographies of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors: A Priority Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6035.
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Medicine in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Lasley is currently the director of the Wildlife Health Center and associate director of the Institute of Toxicology and Environmental Health. His research work has focused on the development of noninvasive methods for investigating reproductive health, comparative reproduction, and reproductive toxicology.

Peter N. Riskind, M.D., Ph.D., is assistant professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and assistant neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Riskind is also chief of the Neuroimmunology Unit and director of the MS Treatment Program at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. He received his B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin, his M.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and his Ph.D. in neuroendocrinology from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas. His research efforts have focused on neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin secretion and on the role of hormones, including prolactin in MS. In 1977, Dr. Riskind was appointed to a National Multiple Sclerosis Society task force on Gender, MS, and Autoimmunity.

Jeanne Mager Stellman, Ph.D., is associate professor of clinical public health and deputy head of the Division of Health Policy and Management at the Columbia University School of Public Health. She received her B.S. degree from the City College of New York and her Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the City University of New York, from which she received an Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award in 1996. Her work has focused on occupational and environmental health, with a special emphasis on women's occupational health issues. Dr. Stellman was the founder and director of the Women's Occupational Health Resource Center; its papers are now housed in the Schlesinger Library at Harvard. She has published extensively in professional and lay publications and is the current editor of the journal Women and Health. Dr. Stellman is the editor-in-chief of the International Labor Organization's Encyclopaedia of Occupational Health and Safety , fourth edition, a four-volume international standard reference, to be published later this year. She was a Guggenheim Fellow and recipient of a National Cancer Institute Preventive Oncology Academic Award and has served on numerous governmental advisory panels.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographies of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors: A Priority Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6035.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographies of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors: A Priority Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6035.
×
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Biographies of Workshop Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors: A Priority Assessment. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6035.
×
Page 71
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Women's health and men's health differ in a variety of ways--women live longer on average, for example, but tend to be sicker as well. Whereas some of these distinctions are based solely on gender, there is growing awareness that the environment and related factors may play a role in creating health status differences between men and women. Various factors, such as genetics and hormones, may account for gender differences in susceptibility to environmental factors.

In 1996 the Office for Research on Women's Health at the National Institutes of Health asked the Institute of Medicine to conduct a workshop study to review some of the current federal research programs devoted to women's health and to clarify the state of knowledge regarding gender-related differences in susceptibility. This book contains a general outline of research needs, a summary of the workshop proceedings (as well as summaries of the speakers' presentations), and an analysis of the participating federal agencies' research portfolios.

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