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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
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Appendix C
U.S. Organ Procurement Organizations and Letter of Request for Non-Heart-Beating Donor Protocols

See the map in Figure C.1 for the service area of each organ procurement organization.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
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FIGURE C-1 Service areas of U.S. organ procurement organizations, 1997. SOURCE: Coralyn Colladay, Esq., Department of Health and Human Services.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
×
  1. New England Organ Bank (Newton, Mass.)
  2. NorthEast Organ Procurement Organization and Tissue Bank (Hartford,Conn.)
  3. New Jersey Organ and Tissue Sharing Network (Springfield)
  4. Center for Donation and Transplantation (Albany, N.Y.)
  5. Upstate New York Transplant Services, Inc. (Buffalo)
  6. New York Organ Donor Network (New York City)
  7. University of Rochester Organ Procurement Program
  8. LifeLink of Puerto Rico
  9. Center for Organ Recovery and Education (Pittsburgh)
  10. Washington Regional Transplant Consortium (Washington, D.C.)
  11. Transplant Resource Center of Maryland, Inc. (Baltimore, Md.)
  12. Delaware Valley Transplantation Program (Philadelphia)
  13. Virginia Organ Procurement Agency (Medlothian)
  14. LifeNet (Virginia Beach, Va.)
  15. Alabama Organ Center (Birmingham)
  16. The Organ Procurement Organization at the University of Florida Medical Center (Gainesville)
  17. LifeShare of the Carolinas (Charlotte, N.C.)
  18. Mississippi Organ Recovery Agency (Jackson)
  19. TransLife (Orlando, Fl.a)
  20. LifeLink of Florida (Tampa)
  21. LifeLink of Southwest Florida (Tampa)
  22. Carolina Organ Procurement Agency (Greensville, N.C.)
  23. Carolina LifeCare (Winston-Salem, N.C.)
  24. University of Miami Organ Procurement Organization
  25. Life Resources Regional Donor Center (Johnson City, Tenn.)
  26. Mid-South Transplant Foundation, Inc. (Memphis, Tenn.)
  27. LifeLink of Georgia (Atlanta)
  28. Kentucky Organ Donor Affiliates (Louisville)
  29. Tennessee Donor Services (Nashville)
  30. South Carolina Organ Procurement Agency (Charleston)
  31. Regional Organ Bank of Illinois (Chicago)
  32. Indiana Organ Procurement Organization, Inc. (Indianapolis)
  33. Organ Procurement Agency of Michigan (Ann Arbor)
  34. Upper Midwest Organ Procurement Organization, Inc. (St. Paul, Minn.)
  35. Ohio Valley Life Center (Cincinnati)
  36. LifeBanc (Cleveland, Ohio)
  37. Lifeline of Ohio Organ Procurement Agency, Inc. (Columbus)
  38. Life Connection of Ohio (Dayton)
  39. University of Wisconsin Organ Procurement Organization (Madison)
  40. Wisconsin Donor Network (Milwaukee)
  41. Arkansas Regional Organ Recovery Agency (Little Rock)
  42. Louisiana Organ Procurement Agency (Metairie)
  43. New Mexico Donor Services (Albuquerque)
  44. Oklahoma Organ Sharing Network (Oklahoma City)
  45. Southwest Organ Bank, Inc./Southwest Transplant Alliance (Dallas)
  46. South Texas Organ Bank, Inc. (San Antonio)
  47. LifeGift Organ Donation Center (Houston)
  48. Iowa Statewide Organ Procurement Organization (Iowa City)
  49. Mid-America Transplant Association (St. Louis, Mo.)
  50. Midwest Organ Bank (Westwood, Kan.)
  51. Nebraska Organ Retrieval System, Inc. (Omaha)
  52. Colorado Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. (Denver)
  53. Intermountain Organ Recovery System (Salt Lake City)
  54. Donor Network of Arizona (Phoenix)
  55. Southern California Organ Procurement Center (Los Angeles)
  56. Regional Organ Procurement Agency of Southern California (Los Angeles)
  57. Golden State Donor Services (Sacramento, Calif.)
  58. Organ and Tissue Acquisition Center of Southern California (San Diego)
  59. California Transplant Donor Network (San Francisco)
  60. Organ Donor Center of Hawaii (Honolulu)
  61. Nevada Donor Network, Inc. (Las Vegas)
  62. Pacific Northwest Transplant Bank (Portland, Ore.)
  63. LifeCenter Northwest (Seattle)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
×
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
×
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C." Institute of Medicine. 1997. Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation: Medical and Ethical Issues in Procurement. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6036.
×
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Non-heart-beating donors (individuals whose deaths are determined by cessation of heart and respiratory function rather than loss of whole brain function) could potentially be of major importance in reducing the gap between the demand for and available supply of organs for transplantation. Prompted by questions concerning the medical management of such donors--specifically, whether interventions undertaken to enhance the supply and quality of potentially transplantable organs (i.e. the use of anticoagulants and vasodilators) were in the best interests of the donor patient--the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services asked the Institute of Medicine to examine from scientific and ethical points of view "alternative medical approaches that can be used to maximize the availability of organs from [a] donor [in an end-of-life situation] without violating prevailing ethical norms...."

This book examines transplantation supply and demand, historical and modern conceptions of non-heart-beating donors, and organ procurement organizations and transplant program policies, and contains recommendations concerning the principles and ethical issues surrounding the topic.

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