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Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption (1998)

Chapter: Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
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E Federal Food Safety Budget Information

To assist the committee in determining the size and scope of the federal food safety budget, the committee asked the four major departments/agencies with responsibility for food safety to provide budget estimates for federal funds spent during the past four fiscal years. The agencies were requested to submit responses based on their involvement in one or more of five areas of federal food safety activity, as identified by the committee and emphasized in a National Food Safety Initiative (Appendix C). These areas are surveillance, inspection, risk assessment, research, and education. The responses of the agencies-the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Commerce-have been consolidated and appear in the table below. Copies of the committee questionnaire and each of the agency responses in full are available from the National Academy of Sciences' (NAS) public information file. Information on accessing these documents is available from the NAS website at http://www.nas.edu.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×

E U.S. Food Safety Budgets (FY 1995-1998) (in dollars)

 

CDCa

NIHb

EPAc

FDAd

NMFSe

USDAf

Subtotal

Surveillance

 

not reported

not reported

 

 

 

 

FY95

2,900,000

 

 

6,339,000

 

532,000

9,771,000

FY96

4,500,000

 

 

7,455,000

 

1,032,000

12,987,000

FY97

4,500,000

 

 

7,500,000

 

1,032,000

13,032,000

FY98

14,500,000

 

 

9,109,000

 

1,532,000

25,141,000

Inspection

not reported

not reported

 

 

 

 

 

FY95

 

 

20,300,000

163,174,000

13,700,000

622,827,000

820,001,000

FY96

 

 

18,200,000

160,737,000

13,400,000

627,977,000

820,314,000

FY97

 

 

19,900,000

151,383,000

13,000,000

655,980,000

840,263,000

FY98

 

 

23,200,000

161,423,000

11,800,000

671,438,000

867,861,000

Risk Assessment

not reported

not reported

 

 

 

 

 

FY95

 

 

91,100,000

6,339,000

 

5,887,000

103,326,000

FY96

 

 

107,400,000

7,455,000

 

6,885,000

121,740,000

FY97

 

 

133,100,000

7,500,000

 

8,272,000

148,872,000

FY98

 

 

126,700,000

9,109,000

 

7,598,000

143,407,000

Research

not reported

 

 

 

 

 

 

FY95

 

 

13,100,000

22,913,000

 

47,812,000

83,825,000

FY96

 

 

12,200,000

22,266,000

 

47,333,000

81,799,000

FY97

 

49,799,000

19,000,000

21,977,000

 

53,557,000

144,333.000

FY98

 

52,873,000

32,000,000

25,632,000

 

60,348,000

170,853,000

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×

Education

not reported

not reported

not reported

 

 

 

 

FY95

 

 

 

12,698,000

 

5,638,000

18,336,000

FY96

 

 

 

13,771,000

 

5,651,000

19,422,000

FY97

 

 

 

15,137,000

 

5,390,000

20,527,000

FY98

 

 

 

17,308,000

 

5,523,000

22,831,000

Surveillance, Risk Assessment, Research, and Education

FY95

 

 

 

 

7,900,000

 

7,900,000

FY96

 

 

 

 

7,800,000

 

7,800,000

FY97

 

 

 

 

7,300,000

 

7,300,000

FY98

 

 

 

 

6,700,000

 

6,700,000

TOTAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,043,159,000

FY95

2,900,000

 

124,500,000

211,463,000

21,600,000

682,696,000

1,064,062,000

FY96

4,500,000

 

137,800,000

211,684,000

21,200,000

688,878,000

1,174,327,000

FY97

4,500,000

49,799,000

172,000,000

203,497,000

20,300,000

724,231,000

1,236,793,000

FY98

14,500,000

52,873,000

181,900,000

222,581,000

18,500,000

746,439,000

 

NOTE: For EPA there is no accounting system that separates food safety from other pesticide program activities. Therefore, the budget estimates provided here include a broader level of resources than just those directly related to food safety.

NOTE: NMFS has combined food safety surveillance, risk assessment, research, and education activities into a single category.

a Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Budget Formulation and Presentation. 1998. Written communication to committee.

b National Institutes of Health, Division of Nutrition Research Coordination and Nutritional Sciences Branch. 1998. Written Communication to Committee.

c Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances. 1998. Written communication to committee.

d Food and Drug Administration. 1998. Written communication to committee.

e United States Department of Commerce, National Marine Fisheries Service, Office of Sustainable Fisheries. 1998. Written communication to committee.

f United States Department of Agriculture. 1998. Written Communication to Committee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
Page 182
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
Page 183
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Federal Food Safety Budget Information." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
Page 184
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How safe is our food supply? Each year the media report what appears to be growing concern related to illness caused by the food consumed by Americans. These food borne illnesses are caused by pathogenic microorganisms, pesticide residues, and food additives. Recent actions taken at the federal, state, and local levels in response to the increase in reported incidences of food borne illnesses point to the need to evaluate the food safety system in the United States. This book assesses the effectiveness of the current food safety system and provides recommendations on changes needed to ensure an effective science-based food safety system. Ensuring Safe Food discusses such important issues as:

What are the primary hazards associated with the food supply? What gaps exist in the current system for ensuring a safe food supply? What effects do trends in food consumption have on food safety? What is the impact of food preparation and handling practices in the home, in food services, or in production operations on the risk of food borne illnesses? What organizational changes in responsibility or oversight could be made to increase the effectiveness of the food safety system in the United States?

Current concerns associated with microbiological, chemical, and physical hazards in the food supply are discussed. The book also considers how changes in technology and food processing might introduce new risks. Recommendations are made on steps for developing a coordinated, unified system for food safety. The book also highlights areas that need additional study. Ensuring Safe Food will be important for policymakers, food trade professionals, food producers, food processors, food researchers, public health professionals, and consumers.

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