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Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption (1998)

Chapter: Appendix F Acknowledgments

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
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F Acknowledgments

The following individuals are among those who have provided assistance to the committee by providing oral testimony during the opening meetings, written comments, and/or written materials for the consideration by the committee.* Their assistance is greatly appreciated.

John Aguirre, United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association

Rhona Applebaum, National Food Producers Association

R. Thomas Van Arsdall, National Council of Farmer Cooperatives

Thomas Billy, Food Safety and Inspection Service

John R. Block, Food Distributors International

Leonard S. Bull, American Society of Animal Science (speaking only for himself)

Jean C. Buzby, Economic Research Service

Amie Chant, Sparks Companies

Jack L. Cooper, Food Industry Environmental Network

Lester M. Crawford, Georgetown University

Judith G. Dausch, National Restaurant Association

J. Clarence (Terry) Davies, Resources for the Future

Caroline Smith DeWaal, Center for Science in the Public Interest

*  

To review written comments submitted to the committee see the National Academy of Sciences' (NAS) public information file. Information on accessing these documents is available from the NAS website at http://www.nas.edu.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
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Richard J. Durbin, United States Senate

Andrew G. Ebert, International Food Additives Council

Jim Esselman, University of Virginia School of Law

John Farquhar, Food Marketing Institute

Vic Fazio, United States House of Representatives

Kirk Ferrell, National Pork Producers Council

Jeffrey K. Francer, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Michael A. Friedman, Food and Drug Administration

Cary P. Frye, International Dairy Foods Association

E. Spencer Garrett, National Marine Fisheries Service

Lynn R. Goldman, Environmental Protection Agency

Richard E. Gutting, Jr., National Fisheries Institute

Robert Hahn, Public Voice for Food and Health Policy

Betty Harden, Food and Drug Administration

Jerome H. Heckman, The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

James H. Hodges, American Meat Institute

Jill Hollingsworth, Food Marketing Institute

Van Hubbard, National Institutes of Health

Karen Hulebak, Food and Drug Administration

Charles H. Jung, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Eileen Kennedy, United States Department of Agriculture

Richard Kirchoff, National Association of State Departments of Agriculture

Edward Knipling, United States Department of Agriculture

Joseph A. Levitt, Food and Drug Administration

Alan S. Levy, Food and Drug Administration

Jerold Mande, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Gary C. Matlock, National Marine Fisheries Service

Donald McNamara, United Egg Producers

Bruce C. Morehead, National Marine Fisheries Service

Ian C. Munro, CanTox, Inc.

Judy Nelson, Environmental Protection Agency

Jacqueline Nowell, United Food and Commercial Workers International Union

Janice Oliver, Food and Drug Administration

Soung Soo Pak, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Douglas Parson, Environmental Protection Agency

Morris Potter, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Donna Reifschneider, National Pork Producers Council

Richard Rominger, United States Department of Agriculture

William Schultz, Food and Drug Administration

Isi Sidiqqui, United States Department of Agriculture

Lisa Siegel, Food and Drug Administration

Mark Silbergeld, Consumers Union of U.S., Inc.

Dan S. Smyly, Association of Food and Drug Officials

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×

Bruce R. Stillings, Institute of Food Technologists

Barbara S. Stowe, Human Sciences Institute, Inc.

Stephen Sundlof, Food and Drug Administration

Lyle P. Vogel, American Veterinary Medical Association

Donna Vogt, Congressional Research Service

Gary Weber, Animal Agriculture Coalition

Richard R. Wood, Food Animal Concerns Trust

Catherine E. Woteki, United States Department of Agriculture

David Wright, Harman and New Hope

Stephen A. Ziller, Grocery Manufacturers of America

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
Page 186
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F Acknowledgments." Institute of Medicine and . 1998. Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6163.
×
Page 188
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How safe is our food supply? Each year the media report what appears to be growing concern related to illness caused by the food consumed by Americans. These food borne illnesses are caused by pathogenic microorganisms, pesticide residues, and food additives. Recent actions taken at the federal, state, and local levels in response to the increase in reported incidences of food borne illnesses point to the need to evaluate the food safety system in the United States. This book assesses the effectiveness of the current food safety system and provides recommendations on changes needed to ensure an effective science-based food safety system. Ensuring Safe Food discusses such important issues as:

What are the primary hazards associated with the food supply? What gaps exist in the current system for ensuring a safe food supply? What effects do trends in food consumption have on food safety? What is the impact of food preparation and handling practices in the home, in food services, or in production operations on the risk of food borne illnesses? What organizational changes in responsibility or oversight could be made to increase the effectiveness of the food safety system in the United States?

Current concerns associated with microbiological, chemical, and physical hazards in the food supply are discussed. The book also considers how changes in technology and food processing might introduce new risks. Recommendations are made on steps for developing a coordinated, unified system for food safety. The book also highlights areas that need additional study. Ensuring Safe Food will be important for policymakers, food trade professionals, food producers, food processors, food researchers, public health professionals, and consumers.

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