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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Participants." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1998. From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6164.
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APPENDIX A
Participants

WORKSHOP ON THE INVISIBLE IMMIGRANT POPULATION: YOUNG CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES SEPTEMBER 1994

Christine Bachrach, Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Center for Population Research, NICHD, Bethesda, MD

Frank Bean, Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX

Rodney R. Cocking, Cognition, Learning and Memory Program, Division of Basic Brain and Behavioral Sciences, Basic Behavior and Cognitive Sciences Research Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Rockville, MD

Glen H. Elder, Jr., Carolina Population Center, University Square East, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

David Featherman, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Michael Fix, The Urban Institute, Washington, DC

Linda Gordon, Statistics Division, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Washington, DC

David Howell, U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform, Washington, DC

Guillermina Jasso, Department of Sociology, New York University, New York, NY

Frank Kessel, Social Science Research Council, New York, NY

Nancy Landale, Population Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Participants." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1998. From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6164.
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Luis Laosa, Educational Testing Service, Research Division, Princeton, NJ

Rose Li, Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Center for Population Research, NICHD, Bethesda, MD

Lindsay Lowell, Immigration Policy and Research, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC

Susan Martin, U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform, Washington, DC

John Mollenkopf, Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, New York, NY

Jeylan Mortimer, Life Course Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Katherine Newman, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University, New York, NY

Laurie Olsen, California Tomorrow, San Francisco, CA

Mark Rosenzweig, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Rubén G. Rumbaut, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Patricia Shiono, Research and Grants, Epidemiology, Center for the Future of Children, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, CA

Mary Lou de Leon Siantz, University of Washington, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA

Betty Lee Sung, Consultant, New York, NY

Robert Valdez, Public Health Service and Interagency Health Policy, Health Care Financing Administration, Washington, DC

Eric Wanner, Russell Sage Foundation, New York, NY

Sheldon H. White, Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Participants." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1998. From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6164.
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Page 209
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Participants." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 1998. From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6164.
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Page 210
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From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families Get This Book
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Immigrant children and youth are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, and so their prospects bear heavily on the well-being of the country. However, relevant public policy is shaped less by informed discussion than by politicized contention over welfare reform and immigration limits.

From Generation to Generation explores what we know about the development of white, black, Hispanic, and Asian children and youth from numerous countries of origin. Describing the status of immigrant children and youth as "severely understudied," the committee both draws on and supplements existing research to characterize the current status and outlook of immigrant children.

The book discusses the many factors—family size, fluency in English, parent employment, acculturation, delivery of health and social services, and public policies—that shape the outlook for the lives of these children and youth. The committee makes recommendations for improved research and data collection designed to advance knowledge about these children and, as a result, their visibility in current policy debates.

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