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Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach (1999)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committe Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies

Committee Members

Rana Fine earned her Ph.d. in marine science at the University of Miami in 1975. Dr. Fine is currently a professor at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami/RSMAS. Her expertise is primarily in understanding of oceanic processes involved in uptake of atmospheric species on decadal time scales. Dr. Fine has served as a member of the Ocean Studies Board and as chair of the OSB nominating committee. She is serving on the scientific steering committee of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and as a member of the NRC TOGA and DEC-CEN advisory panels.

Charles Cox earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of California in 1954 and is a professor of oceanography, emeritus, at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His primary area of expertise is physical oceanography with an emphasis on thermal microstructure and air-sea boundary processes, but is not carrying out research as part of a major ocean program. Dr. Cox is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

William Curry earned his Ph.D. in 1980 from Brown University. He is a Senior Scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution where he is currently the Chair of the Department of Geology and Geophysics. Dr. Curry's primary areas of expertise include marine geology, sedimentology, and paleoceanography. He is a member of the Ocean Studies Board and has served on its Executive Committee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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Dr. Curry is also a former scientific steering committee member and research participant in Marine aspects of Earth System History (MESH).

Ellen Druffel earned her Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, San Diego in 1980. Since 1993, Dr. Druffel has been a professor at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include the cycling of organic carbon between the surface and deep ocean, and determination of past changes in circulation and ventilation in the upper ocean. Dr. Druffel is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board.

Jeffrey Fox earned his Ph.D. in geology/geophysics from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in 1972. Since 1996, Dr. Fox has been a professor at Texas A&M University with a joint appointment in the Departments of Oceanography and Geology/Geophysics. His primary areas of expertise include the structure, composition, and evolution of the ocean crust and the tectonics of the Mid-Ocean Ridge System. Dr. Fox has served as Director of Science Services of the Ocean Drilling Program and as a member of the scientific steering committee and as a research participant for Ridge Inter-Disciplinary Global Experiments (RIDGE).

Roger Lukas earned his Ph.D. in oceanography in 1981 from the University of Hawaii. Since 1991, he has been a Professor in the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii. Dr. Lukas' research interests focus on air-sea interactions. He has been a member of a number of major ocean research program steering committees and is a member of the NRC TOGA and GOALS advisory panels.

James Murray received a Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from the MIT-WHOI Joint Program in 1973. Since 1973 he has been on the faculty of the School of Oceanography, University of Washington where he is now Professor. Dr. Murray's primary areas of expertise are chemical oceanography, aquatic chemistry, and trace metal geochemistry. He is currently on the US JGOFS ExecPlus Committee and the International JGOFS scientific steering committee and Executive Committees.

Neil Opdyke earned his Ph.D. in geology in 1958 from Durham University in England. Since 1981, Dr. Opdyke has been a professor with the Department of Geology at the University of Florida. His primary areas of expertise include geology, paleomagnetism, and the evolution of the seafloor. Dr. Opdyke is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served as a scientific steering committee member for the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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Thomas Powell earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1970. Dr. Powell is now a professor at the University of California, Berkeley and is a member of the OSB Committee on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries. His areas of expertise are the impact of physical processes on the ecology of plankton in lakes, estuaries, and the coastal ocean. Dr. Powell served as chair of the scientific steering committee of U.S. Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) from 1992-1997.

Michael Roman earned a Ph.D. in zoology in 1976 from the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Roman is a professor at the Horn Point Laboratory at the Center for Environmental Science at the University of Maryland. His research interests focus on biological oceanography, zooplankton ecology, and plankton food web dynamics. Dr. Roman is currently the chair of the Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP) scientific steering committee.

Thomas Royer earned his Ph.D. in physical oceanography from the Texas A&M University in 1969. From 1981 to 1996, Dr. Royer was a professor at the University of Alaska and is presently a professor at Old Dominion University. His primary areas of interest include mesoscale ocean circulation with emphasis on sub-polar gyres and coastal boundary currents. Dr. Royer is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board.

Lynda Shapiro earned her Ph.D. from Duke University in 1974. Since 1990, Dr. Shapiro has been the Director of the Institute of Marine Biology at the University of Oregon. Her primary areas of expertise are marine biology and biological oceanography. Dr. Shapiro is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board.

Anne Thompson earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry in 1978 from Bryn Mawr College. Dr. Thompson is an atmospheric chemist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Thompson's research specialties are in air-sea gas exchange, the effects of anthropogenic activities (aviation, biomass burning) on tropospheric ozone ant the use of satellites to measure tropical ozone.

Andrew Weaver earned his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the University of British Columbia in 1987. Dr. Weaver is a professor in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria. His research interests focus on climate dynamics, ocean/climate/paleoclimate modeling, and the role of the ocean in climate change and variability. Dr. Weaver was a research participant in Canada's World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
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Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 110
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committe Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6167.
×
Page 111
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During recent years, large-scale investigations into global climate change and other highly visible issues have taken the lion's share of declining research funds. At the same time, funding for basic research in such core disciplines as physical oceanography, biological oceanography, chemical oceanography, and marine geology has dwindled.

Global Ocean Science examines how the largest U.S. ocean research programs, such as the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), have significantly contributed to our understanding of the oceans. The book examines the impact of these programs on research, education, and collegiality within this diverse scientific community and offers recommendations to help ensure a vital future for ocean science, including:

Specific results of the programs such as data collected, conceptual breakthroughs, information published, demonstrable use of program products, incorporation of new knowledge into education, and contribution to policymaking and decisionmaking by federal agencies.

Mechanisms for efficiently identifying knowledge gaps and research questions, strategic planning of research programs, managing competitive proposals, securing needed resources, and more.

This practical book will be welcomed by ocean investigators, users of oceanographic research findings, policymakers, administrators, educators, and students.

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