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Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists (1998)

Chapter: Appendix B Participants in Public Meeting

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Participants in Public Meeting." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
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Appendix B
Participants in Public Meeting

The committee sponsored a public meeting on April 13, 1996, to hear the views of the life-science community on the issues included in the committee's charge. Listed below are the names of speakers at the public meeting and the names of those who attended the meeting or submitted statements for the benefit of the committee.

Speakers

Robyn Angliss, National Marine Fisheries Service

Eliene Augenbaum, Association of Science Professionals

Finley Austin, Burroughs Welcome Fund

Kevin Aylsworth, Senator Hatfield's Office

John Beneditt, AAAS/SCIENCE Next Wave

Carol Brewer, University of Montana

Malcolm Campbell, Davidson College

Rita Colwell, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute

Glenn Crosby, Washington State University

Caren Helbing, University of Calgary, Canada

Brian Hyps, American Society of Plant Physiologists

Gene A. Nelson, Microsoft Corporation

David Olson, University of California, San Francisco

Erika C. Shugart, University of Virginia

Sam Silverstein, Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Abigail Stack, Food and Drug Administration

Michael Teitelbaum, Sloan Foundation

Robert Tombes, Virginia Commonwealth University

Attended or Submitted Papers

Josephine C. Adams, University College London

Janet van Adelsberg, Columbia University

Stan Amons, Association of American Medical Colleges

Michael Battalora, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Scott D. Blystone, Washington University

David B. Bregman, Yale School of Medicine

Sheryl K. Brining, National Institutes of Health

Shawn Burgess, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

David G. Capco, Arizona State University

Ida Chow, American University

Stan Cohn, DePaul University

David R. Cool, National Institutes of Health

Jaleh Daie, University of Wisconsin

Jerry Dodgson, Michigan State University

Diane Epperson, National Institutes of Health

Evan Ferguson, Sigma Xi

Michael Fordis, National Institutes of Health

Catherine Gaddy, Council on Scientific Personnel

Howard Garrison, Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Ursula Goodenough, Washington University

Jay A. Haron, Knight-Ridder Information

Joanne Hazlett, National Science Foundation

Philip M. Hemken, Iowa State University

Julie R. Hens, University of Maryland

Milton Hernandez, National Institutes of Health

Marc Horowitz, National Institutes of Health

Elizabeth Jansen, University of Minnesota

Naomi Kaminsky, American Pharmaceutical Association

Doug Kellogg, University of California, Santa Cruz

Eero Lehtonen, University of Helsinki

John Lowe, University of Michigan Medical School

R. Joel Lowy, AFRRI/Department of Defense

Anthony C. Madu, Virginia Union University

Michael S. Marks, University of Pennsylvania

Charles Matsuda, University of Hawaii

Bert Menco, Northwestern University

Katsumi Mochitate, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Randall T. Moon, University of Washington

Alan Munn, Switzerland

Richard Murphy, Neurological Institute, Canada

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Participants in Public Meeting." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
×

Lynne A. Opperman, University of Virginia

Christine M. Pauken, Food and Drug Administration

Michael Powell, National Institutes of Health

Linda Pullan

Janet Ross, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Charles Selden, National Institutes of Health

Heidi Sofia, National Institutes of Health

Robert Stack, University of Michigan

W. Steven Ward, New Jersey Medical School

Tracy Ware, University of California, San Francisco

Ora A. Weisz, University of Pittsburgh

Cheryl Wellington, University of Calgary

Marianne Wessling-Resnick, Harvard School of Public Health

Lawrence Wiseman, College of William and Mary

Joyce Woodford, National Institutes of Health

Marie Wooten, Auburn University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Participants in Public Meeting." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Participants in Public Meeting." National Research Council. 1998. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6244.
×
Page 98
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In each year between 1994 and 1996, more than 7,000 individuals received a Ph.D. in life-science, and the number of graduates is rising sharply. If present trends continue, about half of those graduates will have found permanent positions as independent researchers within ten years after graduation. These statistics--and the labor market situation they reflect--can be viewed either positively or negatively depending on whether one is a young scientist seeking a career or an established investigator whose productivity depends on the labor provided by an abundant number of graduate students.

This book examines the data concerning the production of doctorates in life-science and the changes in the kinds of positions graduates have obtained. It discusses the impact of those changes and suggests ways to deal with the challenges of supply versus demand for life-science Ph.D. graduates. Trends in the Early Careers of Life Scientists will serve as an information resource for young scientists deciding on career paths and as a basis for discussion by educators and policymakers as they examine the current system of education linked to research and decide if changes in that system are needed.

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