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Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities (1998)

Chapter: Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
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Page 39

Appendix C
CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda

Dear Friends of the Climate Research Committee:

The Climate Research Committee (CRC) of the National Research Council (NRC) and the Office of the U.S. Global Change Research Program invite you to participate on 11 and 12 June 1996 in a discussion of the Quality and Infrastructure of Climate Modeling in the United States. This discussion is being held in Washington, D.C. as part of a meeting of the CRC. Representatives of the federal agencies that support climate modeling are expected to attend this meeting. Those federal representatives, as they allocate resources and organize the government's support of climate modeling, are greatly interested in the thoughts of the scientific community involved in climate modeling. The CRC will also use this discussion as it prepares recommendations to the federal agencies and to the research community of the future of climate modeling. The agenda of the complete meeting follows this

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
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Page 40

message.

We are working hard to ensure a broad spectrum of scientists involved in all aspects of climate modeling at this meeting and believe that your perspective can provide a valuable contribution to the discussions. We look forward to seeing you.

Sincerely,

William Sprigg
Director
Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×

Page 41

Agenda of Climate Modeling Workshop

TUESDAY, 11 JUNE

Executive Session

7:30 a.m.

Breakfast available in room and refectory

8:00 a.m.

Executive session
Eric Barron, chair

11:30 a.m.

Lunch in refectory

Public Session

The Quality and Infrastructure of Climate Modeling in the United States

Climate modeling is a large complex enterprise. It requires modeling not only the atmosphere, but also modeling of conditions at the lower boundary involving the oceans, land surface (especially vegetation), surface hydrology, cryosphere, and sources of atmospheric constituents (such as carbon dioxide, methane, aerosols, and CFCs). Observational data must be obtained, assimilated, and archived. Model development and access must be managed. Model output must be archived, made available, and analyzed. This study session, sponsored by the NRC and the USGCRP, will examine ways to improve the quality and infrastructure of climate modeling in the United States.

12:30 p.m.

Introduction to session and review of the agenda Tom Karl, chair

12:40 p.m.

The impetus for this discussion of climate modeling Mike MacCracken

12:50 p.m.

What issues related to the quality and infrastructure of climate modeling face the federal agencies (especially those participating in the Interagency Modeling and Prediction Working Group)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
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Page 42

 

IMAP WG representative

1:10 p.m.

What issues face the scientific community related to the quality and structure of climate modeling? How should the CRC address the issues facing both the federal agencies and the scientific community?
Tom Karl

1:40 p.m.

Self introductions around the room. Participants will be asked for a few words on what they would like to see as the results of this meeting.

2:00 p.m.

Summary of the major areas of agreement and disagreement in responses to the questionnaire on modeling from the USGCRP V. Krishnamurthy

2:20 p.m.

The key conclusions and response to the General Accounting Office report on “Global Warming: Limitations of General Circulation Models and the Costs of Modeling Efforts” GAO representative

2:30 p.m.

Break

2:50 p.m.

What are the strengths and weaknesses of climate modeling in the United States? What impediments are there to improving the U.S. modeling effort?

3:20 p.m.

How does the U.S. climate modeling effort compare to modeling efforts in other countries?

3:50 p.m.

What steps should federal agencies take to improve the quality and usefulness of climate models?

4:20 p.m.

What steps should the scientific community take to improve the quality and usefulness of climate models?

4:50 p.m.

Review of plans for Wednesday
Tom Karl

5:00 p.m.

Adjourn for day

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×

Page 43

7:30 p.m.

Working dinner for session chair, discussion leaders, and invited guests

WEDNESDAY, 12 JUNE

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast available in room or refectory

 

Continuation of discussion on the “Quality and Infrastructure of Climate Modeling in the United States”

8:30 a.m.

Developing consensus recommendations for improving the climate modeling effort in the United States Tom Karl, chair

8:40 a.m. agencies?

What should the CRC recommend to the federal

10:20 a.m.

Break

10:40 a.m.

What should the CRC recommend to the scientific community?

12:20 p.m.

Summary
Tom Karl

12:40 p.m.

Lunch in refectory

1:40 p.m.

Depending on the level of agreement reached in the morning session, the discussion will continue or the CRC will meet in executive session to begin preparation of a report on the results of the session on the quality and infrastructure of climate modeling in the United States.

2:30 p.m.

Break

2:50 p.m.

Executive Session

4:00 p.m.

Adjourn meeting

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×
Page 39
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×
Page 40
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×
Page 42
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - CRC Climate Modeling Workshop Invitation and Agenda." National Research Council. 1998. Capacity of U.S. Climate Modeling to Support Climate Change Assessment Activities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6365.
×
Page 44
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The U.S. government has pending before it the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, an agreement to limit the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), which is largely based on the threat GHGs pose to the global climate. Such an agreement would have significant economic and national security implications, and therefore any national policy decisions regarding this issue should rely in part on the best possible suite of scenarios from climate models.

The U.S. climate modeling research community is a world leader in intermediate and smaller climate modeling efforts-research that has been instrumental in improving the understanding of specific components of the climate system. Somewhat in contrast, the United States has been less prominent in producing high-end climate modeling results, which have been featured in recent international assessments of the impacts of climate change. The fact that U.S. contributions of these state-of-the-art results have been relatively sparse has prompted a number of prominent climate researchers to question the current organization and support of climate modeling research in the United States, and has led ultimately to this report.

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