National Academies Press: OpenBook

From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health (1999)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee Biographies

« Previous: Literature Cited
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×

Page 113

APPENDIXES

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×

There was a problem loading page 114.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×

Page 115

Appendix A
Committee Biographies

WILLIAM FENICAL received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of California at Riverside in 1968. Since 1983, he has served as a professor of oceanography for Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) at the University of California in San Diego. In 1996, Dr. Fenical took on the role of director of the Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine at SIO. In addition, he serves as the coordinator for the University of California Sea Grant College Program. Dr. Fenical's background is in the area of marine chemistry.

DANIEL BADEN received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Miami in 1977 and he currently serves as a professor of marine biology at the University of Miami. Dr. Baden directs one of five NIEHS Marine and Freshwater Biomedical Sciences Centers. Miami's Center focuses on marine toxicology, with an active interest in toxic dinoflagellates and the hazardous environmental chemicals they produce.

MAURICE BURG earned his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1955. He currently serves as chief of the Laboratory of Kidney and Electrolyte Metabolism for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Burg's research in kidney homeostasis has focused on how osmolytes counteract the denaturing effects of urea in the medulla of the kidney, a compensatory mechanism that was first identified in studies of the high concentrations of urea in the tissues of sharks and rays. Dr. Burg is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

CLAUDE DE VILLE DE GOYET received his M.D. from the University of Louvain, Belgium in 1965. He currently serves as the chief of emergency preparedness for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×

Page 116

the Pan American Health Organization. Dr. de Ville de Goyet's formal training is in tropical medicine, public hygiene, malariology, and filariology; however, his avocation is the application of this knowledge to disaster relief (specifically, ocean disasters).

DARRELL JAY GRIMES received his Ph.D. in microbiology from Colorado State University in 1971. He currently serves as the director of the Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi. Dr. Grimes' research interests include the microbiology of waste disposal and environmental contaminants, microbiological quality of water resources, and the long-term survival of bacteria.

MICHAEL KATZ, a pediatrician, received his M.D. degree in 1956 from the State University of New York and, in 1963, earned a M.S. degree from Columbia University in tropical medicine and parasitology. His clinical expertise is in pediatric infectious diseases. He currently serves as vice president for research for the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation and is also Carpentier Professor, Emeritus of Pediatrics at Columbia University, where he chaired the Department of Pediatrics from 1976 to 1992. Dr. Katz's research interests include mechanisms of latency of neurotrophic viruses, relationship between malnutrition and infection, and diarrheal disease. Dr. Katz is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

NANCY MARCUS received a Ph.D. in biology from Yale University in 1976. She currently serves as director of the Florida State University Marine Laboratory and is a professor in the Department of Oceanography. Dr. Marcus' research interests include evolution, ecology, population genetics of marine zooplankton, and dormancy. She is currently a member of the Ocean Studies Board.

SHIRLEY POMPONI earned her Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Miami, RSMAS, in 1977. For the past four years she has led the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution's Division of Biomedical Marine Research in the discovery of novel, marine-derived, biologically-active compounds with therapeutic potential. The major emphasis of her research is on the development of methods for sustainable use of marine resources for drug discovery and development.

PETER RHINES received his Ph.D. in oceanography at Trinity College, Cambridge University, in 1967. Dr. Rhines currently serves as a professor of oceanography and atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington. His research interests include the ocean/atmosphere general circulation, climate change, and the motion of trace chemicals. He has a field program in the Labrador Sea, as well as maintaining a geophysical fluid dynamics laboratory and computer modeling. Dr. Rhines is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×

Page 117

PATRICIA TESTER earned a Ph.D. in oceanography at Oregon State University in 1983. She serves as a research fishery biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service. Dr. Tester's interests include the effect of climatology, circulation, and water column conditions on the initiation, growth, and transport of phytoplankton blooms.

JOHN VENA earned his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the State University of New York in 1980. He serves as associate chairman and professor for the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine at the University at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Vena has a wide variety of research interests in Environmental Epidemiology, which have included risk perception, and the impact of consumption of contaminated fish on reproductive health.

NRC Staff:

SUSAN ROBERTS (project director) earned a Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Roberts is a program officer for the National Research Council's Ocean Studies Board. Dr. Roberts staffs studies on marine resources and health effects of climate change at the National Research Council. Her research interests include marine microbiology, fish physiology, marine biotechnology, and biomedicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×

There was a problem loading page 118.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 115
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 118
Next: Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations »
From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health Get This Book
×
Buy Hardback | $48.00 Buy Ebook | $38.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

What can sharks teach us about our immune system? What can horseshoe crabs show us about eyesight?

The more we learn about the ocean, the more we realize how critical these vast bodies of water are to our health and well-being. Sometimes the ocean helps us, as when a marine organism yields a new medical treatment. At other times, the ocean poses the threat of coastal storm surges or toxic algal blooms.

From Monsoons to Microbes offers a deeper look into the oceans that surround us, often nurturing yet sometimes harming humankind. This book explores the links among physical oceanography, public health, epidemiology, marine biology, and medicine in understanding what the ocean has to offer. It will help readers grasp such important points as:

  • How the ocean's sweeping physical processes create long-term phenomena such as El Nino and short-term disastrous events such as tsunamis--including what communities can do to prepare.
  • What medicines and nutritional products have come from the ocean and what the prospects are for more such discoveries.
  • How estuaries work--where salt and fresh water meet--and what can go wrong, as in the 7,000 square mile "dead zone" at the out-flow of the Mississippi River.
  • How the growing demand for seafood and the expansion of ocean-going transport has increased our exposure to infectious agents--and how these agents can be tracked down and fought.
  • Why "red tides" of toxic algae suddenly appear in previously unaffected coastal areas, and what happens when algal toxins find their way into our food supply or the air we breathe.

The book recommends ways we can implement exciting new technologies to monitor the physics, chemistry, and biology of the ocean to recognize change as it happens. From the impact of worldwide atmospheric warming to the significance of exotic bacteria from submarine hydrothermal vents, the ocean has many depths left to explore.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!