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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
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Appendix C
Workshop Program

image

Ocean Studies Board
Committee on The Ocean's Role in Human Health
American Geophysical Union (AGU) Building
2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC
June 8–10, 1998

Program

Monday, June 8 - Conference Room A

9:00 a.m. Welcome/Introductions - William Fenical, Chair

Session I: Marine Natural Disasters

9:30 a.m. ''The Role of Ocean Systems in Marine Natural Disasters" Peter Rhines (University of Washington)

10:00 a.m. "Estuarine and Near-Shore Transport and Stratification" William Wiseman (Louisiana State University)

10:30 a.m. BREAK

10:45 a.m. "Oceanic Processes Excited by Hurricanes" Nick Shay (University of Miami, RSMAS)

11:15 a.m. "Public Health Impacts of Tropical Storms and El Niño" Claude de Ville de Goyet (Pan American Health Organization)

11:45 a.m. Discussion Session

12:00 p.m. LUNCH BREAK

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
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Page 124

Session II: Infectious Diseases

1:00 p.m. "Waterborne Diseases: Are They Really Detectable, Predictable, and Preventable?" D. Jay Grimes (The University of Southern Mississippi)

1:30 p.m. "Climatic Events Associated with Viral Contamination of Estuaries" Joan Rose (University of South Florida)

2:00 p.m. "Global Warming and Potential Changes in Vector-borne Diseases" Milan Trpis (School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University)

2:30 p.m. "Infectious Diseases in the Developing World" Frances Carr (USAID)

3:00 p.m. Discussion Session

3:15 p.m. BREAK

Session III: Harmful Algal Blooms

3:30 p.m. "Harmful Algal Blooms & Marine Food Webs" Pat Tester (National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA)

4:00 p.m. "Marine Toxins: Orphan Receptors, Charlatan Regulators, and Emerging and Re-Emerging Disease" Dan Baden (University of Miami)

4:30 p.m. "Marine Toxins and Public Health" Lorraine Backer (CDC: National Center for Environmental Health)

5:00 p.m. "Natural Toxins in Seafood: Challenges and Possibilities" Sherwood Hall (Food and Drug Administration)

5:30 p.m. Discussion Session

5:45 p.m. Reception

6:45 p.m. Adjourn for the day.

Tuesday, June 9 - Conference Room A
Session IV: Marine Organisms as Models for Biomedical Research

9:00 a.m. "From Sea Urchins to Man: What Marine Embryo Research Tells Us About Human Health and Disease" David Epel (Stanford University)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
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9:30 a.m. "Evolutionarily Conserved Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance: Marine Organisms and the Human Kidney" Joan Ferraris (National Institutes of Health)

10:00 a.m. "Antibodies of Sharks: Evolutionary Emergence and Relevance to Autoimmunity and Infection" John Marchalonis (University of Arizona)

10:30 a.m. BREAK

11:00 a.m. "An Evolutionary and Genetic Approach for Understanding the Neurobiological Basis of Vertebrate Behavior" Robert Baker (New York University Medical School)

11:30 a.m. Discussion Session

11:45 a.m. Lunch Break

Session V: Marine Natural Products

1:00 p.m. "Marine Microorganisms: Developing a New Drug Resource" William Fenical (Scripps Institution of Oceanography)

1:30 p.m. "Marine Natural Products: Therapeutic Potential of Compounds Derived from Marine Invertebrates" Shirley Pomponi (Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution, Inc.)

2:00 p.m. "Learning Drug Design from Marine Snails" Baldomero Olivera (University of Utah)

2:30 p.m. Discussion Session

2:45 p.m. BREAK

3:00 p.m. Panel Discussion: "Health, Ecological and Economic Dimensions of Global Change: Tracking Marine Disturbance and Disease" Ben Sherman, Erika Siegfried (Harvard Medical School, Center for Health and the Global Environment)

"Application of Remote Sensing for the Detection of Vibrio cholerae by Indirect Measurements" Anwarul Huq (University of Maryland)

4:30 p.m. Adjourn Public Session

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
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Page 123
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 124
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 125
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Program." National Research Council. 1999. From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean's Role in Human Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6368.
×
Page 126
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What can sharks teach us about our immune system? What can horseshoe crabs show us about eyesight?

The more we learn about the ocean, the more we realize how critical these vast bodies of water are to our health and well-being. Sometimes the ocean helps us, as when a marine organism yields a new medical treatment. At other times, the ocean poses the threat of coastal storm surges or toxic algal blooms.

From Monsoons to Microbes offers a deeper look into the oceans that surround us, often nurturing yet sometimes harming humankind. This book explores the links among physical oceanography, public health, epidemiology, marine biology, and medicine in understanding what the ocean has to offer. It will help readers grasp such important points as:

  • How the ocean's sweeping physical processes create long-term phenomena such as El Nino and short-term disastrous events such as tsunamis--including what communities can do to prepare.
  • What medicines and nutritional products have come from the ocean and what the prospects are for more such discoveries.
  • How estuaries work--where salt and fresh water meet--and what can go wrong, as in the 7,000 square mile "dead zone" at the out-flow of the Mississippi River.
  • How the growing demand for seafood and the expansion of ocean-going transport has increased our exposure to infectious agents--and how these agents can be tracked down and fought.
  • Why "red tides" of toxic algae suddenly appear in previously unaffected coastal areas, and what happens when algal toxins find their way into our food supply or the air we breathe.

The book recommends ways we can implement exciting new technologies to monitor the physics, chemistry, and biology of the ocean to recognize change as it happens. From the impact of worldwide atmospheric warming to the significance of exotic bacteria from submarine hydrothermal vents, the ocean has many depths left to explore.

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