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Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers (2000)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
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APPENDIX C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

James Lardner (chair) retired as vice president for tractor and component operations at Deere & Company, where he implemented supply chain integration methods, including supplier participation in product design and integration of communication and computer tools. These techniques contributed to a reduction in product development cycle times of more than 60 percent. Mr. Lardner has served the National Research Council (NRC) as chair of the Manufacturing Studies Board, member of the Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems, and member of seven manufacturing committees. He has also been a member of five panels or committees for the National Academy of Engineering. Mr. Lardner is a fellow of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and a current member of the boards of directors of two companies. He has extensive experience in implementing supply chain integration, as well as in manufacturing.

Steven J. Bomba is vice president for technology at Johnson Controls, Inc. He has participated in supply chain initiatives in several manufacturing divisions of Johnson Controls, both as a supplier and as a customer. He has been active in addressing the needs of small and medium-sized manufacturing supply chain participants in the Milwaukee area. Prior to joining Johnson Controls, he held a number of management positions, including vice president of advanced manufacturing technologies at Rockwell International. His expertise is in supplier operations and capabilities, as well as supply chain management. Dr. Bomba has served on several NRC committees, was a participant in the Japan-U.S. Manufacturing Research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
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Exchange, and was a member of the Panel on Equipment Reliability and Productivity. He is a past member of the NRC Manufacturing Studies Board.

John A. Clendenin, recently manager of new business ventures at Xerox Corporation, is now a professor at Harvard University. Previously, Mr. Clendenin was a manager of integrated supply chain strategies and business processes and held several other positions in which he was responsible for supply chain development. He has delivered keynote addresses at conferences on supply chain logistics and distribution and has developed workshops for business professionals. Mr. Clendenin was chair of the Best Practices in Supply Chain Management Conference in 1997. He has an extensive background in supply chain integration and operations.

Gerald E. Jenks is department head, supplier management, at The Boeing Company in St. Louis. In his current capacity, he is responsible for the development and implementation of supplier management methods and processes. He previously was manager, F-15 supplier management, where he was responsible for all supply chain activities and implemented a new supplier management approach. Prior to that, he was manager of a Harpoon Program subcontract, where he initiated methods for improving the quality and schedule performance of suppliers. He has extensive experience in supply chain operations, particularly with suppliers of defense products.

John J. Klim, Jr., is the president of D&E Industries, Huntington, West Virginia, a successful small business that makes forged and machined parts for the transportation, construction, and mining industries. He is a past chairman of the Advisory Board of the West Virginia District of the U.S. Small Business Administration and was a 1987 delegate to the White House Conference on Small Business. He is vice president of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce and a member of the Board of Directors of the West Virginia Chamber of Commerce.

Edward Kwiatkowski is president and chief executive officer of Supply America Corporation, a nonprofit company that provides information, decision support, and implementation assistance to supply chains adapting advanced manufacturing technologies and business practices. Mr. Kwiatkowski was previously vice president of CAMP, Inc., where he was responsible for management of the Great Lakes Manufacturing Technology Center and the Electronics Resource Center. Both of these centers worked with small manufacturers to improve their manufacturing

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

products and processes. He also served on the Board of Directors for the Modernization Forum and the National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing.

Hau Lee is the Klein Perkins, Mayfield, and Sequoia Capital Professor and deputy chairman of the Department of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He is the founder and current director of the Stanford Global Supply Chain Management Forum, an industry-academic consortium to advance the theory and practice of global supply chain management. Dr. Lee is a consultant on global supply chain management for several Fortune 100 companies. He is on the editorial board of many international journals, including Supply Chain Management Review, and has published 42 papers on manufacturing operations and supply chain systems.

Charles W. Lillie is assistant vice president at Science Applications International Corporation, where he has held several positions related to the development and management of computer resources, including director of management information systems. In the past three years he established a division to focus on electronic commerce and Worldwide Web technologies for communication between prime manufacturers and their suppliers. Dr. Lillie recently chaired an international conference on software reuse and has chaired six annual workshops since 1992.

Mary C. Murphy-Hoye is program manager for strategic programs at Intel Corporation where she is responsible for supplier development and supply chain operations. She has developed and implemented a corporate-wide network for interacting with suppliers. In earlier assignments, she implemented a global inventory management system and a supply chain management system. Ms. Murphy-Hoye is currently a member of the Electronic Company Supply Chain Integration and Systems Consortium, an association of leading companies in the electronics industry.

James R. Myers is a partner in the law firm Kilpatrick Stockton LLP, specializing in intellectual property. He is currently general counsel for the National Initiative for Supply Chain Integration, which is committed to developing advanced technologies for improving supply chain performance. Members of this organization include companies in the forefront of supply chain integration, such as DaimlerChrysler, Proctor & Gamble, Honda, Harley Davidson, Trane, and Deere. Mr. Myers also participated in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Manufacturing Extension Partnership. His expertise is in intellectual property issues, particularly in the context of integrated supply chains.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

James B. Rice, Jr., is director of the Integrated Supply Chain Management Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), an industry-academia collaborative research program focused on supply chain integration. Mr. Rice also teaches the ''Supply Chain Context" course in the Master of Engineering in Logistics degree program at MIT and conducts research on the design of supply chain management organizations and systems. He recently developed a strategic framework, taxonomy, and recommended practices for managing the horizontal processes of supply chains. Prior to his current appointment at MIT, Mr. Rice held several positions in manufacturing and logistics at The Procter & Gamble Company. He is currently a member of the Integrated Advisory Board for the KLICT supply chain research initiative in the Netherlands, the editorial board of Supply Chain Management Review, and the Board of Directors of the New England Chapter of the Council of Logistics Management.

Oliver Williamson is professor of business administration, professor of economics, and professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley. He has published widely on economic efficiency and the design of corporate and legal systems as related to the structuring of prime contractors and suppliers in integrated supply chains. In addition to his membership in the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Williamson is a fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Econometrics Society.

Thomas Young is a retired president and chief operating officer of Martin Marietta Corporation and executive vice president of Lockheed Martin. He previously headed Martin Marietta Corporation's Electronics and Missiles Group, where supply chain management was a major facet of operations. Mr. Young has served on the NRC Committee on Space Technology Needs for the Future and was chair of the Committee on the International Space Station.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
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Page 126
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 127
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 128
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 129
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
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The managed flow of goods and information from raw material to final sale also known as a "supply chain" affects everything--from the U.S. gross domestic product to where you can buy your jeans. The nature of a company's supply chain has a significant effect on its success or failure--as in the success of Dell Computer's make-to-order system and the failure of General Motor's vertical integration during the 1998 United Auto Workers strike.

Supply Chain Integration looks at this crucial component of business at a time when product design, manufacture, and delivery are changing radically and globally. This book explores the benefits of continuously improving the relationship between the firm, its suppliers, and its customers to ensure the highest added value.

This book identifies the state-of-the-art developments that contribute to the success of vertical tiers of suppliers and relates these developments to the capabilities that small and medium-sized manufacturers must have to be viable participants in this system. Strategies for attaining these capabilities through manufacturing extension centers and other technical assistance providers at the national, state, and local level are suggested.

This book identifies action steps for small and medium-sized manufacturers--the "seed corn" of business start-up and development--to improve supply chain management. The book examines supply chain models from consultant firms, universities, manufacturers, and associations. Topics include the roles of suppliers and other supply chain participants, the rise of outsourcing, the importance of information management, the natural tension between buyer and seller, sources of assistance to small and medium-sized firms, and a host of other issues.

Supply Chain Integration will be of interest to industry policymakers, economists, researchers, business leaders, and forward-thinking executives.

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