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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

Index

A

Aerospace industry

Boeing, 53, 54, 57-58, 104

NASA, 86

After-sales support, 2, 3, 4, 5, 13, 57, 125

documentation, 2, 8, 13, 98

see also Recycling and disposal

Agility, 2, 13, 86, 93

Antitrust regulations, 63, 67

Asset management, 17, 30, 36, 38, 39, 40

see also Inventories

Astronics Corporation, 93-94

Attitudes, 69-70

corporate, general, 6, 13, 35, 67, 71, 97

resistance to change, 37, 107

Automobile industry, 17-22, 32, 83

B

Benchmarking, 40, 41, 104

Best practices, 8, 52, 103

Bidding, competitive, 18, 20, 22, 52, 53-54

Boeing Company, 53, 54, 57-58, 104

C

CAD/CAM, 19, 46, 47, 48, 72, 82-85, 101, 118, 120, 122, 131

Cambridge Information Network, 75

Capability gaps, 2, 3-4, 14, 15, 35, 43, 44, 45, 52, 61, 66, 72, 85, 87, 90, 99, 101, 104-107 (passim)

mapping, 35, 105-106, 107, 124-125

Case studies

integration, forces driving, 28-31

on-line commodity buying, 53-54

outsourcing, 17-22

repositioning strategies, 93-94

Center for Advanced Purchasing Studies, 104

Chrysler Corporation, 17-20, 21, 32

Communications capabilities, 4, 6, 7, 22, 27, 30, 32, 33, 37-38, 40, 57, 67, 72, 73-74, 77, 86, 90, 91, 93, 96, 98, 105

English, use of, 4, 52-53, 109

inventory reduction, 57

quality issues, 52

see also Information sharing;

Information systems;

Internet technologies, Telecommunications

Competitiveness Review, 106-107

Computer technologies, 19, 47, 48, 72, 73, 100, 104

activity-based costing, 54, 55

CAD/CAM, 19, 46, 47, 48, 72, 82-85, 101, 118, 120, 122, 131

enterprise resource planning software, 7, 31, 77-78, 82

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

expertise, 79, 85

Simulation-Based Acquisition, 83-84

specific examples of integration, 21, 28-31

supply chain integration software, 7, 31, 81-82, 98

see also Extranet;

Internet technologies

Concurrent engineering, 19, 84, 131

Constraints, 43, 44, 99, 106, 107

regulatory, 14-15, 62, 67, 70, 101

Construction industry, 22-23

Contracts and contracting, 17-18, 22-23

bidding, competitive, 18, 20, 22, 52, 53-54

construction industry, 22-23

defense industry, 14-15, 23

long-term, 95, 96

partnerships, 60-63

small business set-asides, 35, 103-104

see also Outsourcing

Cost and cost-benefit factors, 2, 3, 4, 9, 13, 31, 50, 52-54, 85

computerized design tools, 85

e-Business, 78-80

enterprise resource planning and supply chain integration software , 7

highly-accelerated life testing/stress screening, 51-52

inventory costs, 5, 56-57

labor, 2, 4, 93

opportunity costs, 31

outsourcing, 17, 18

partnerships, 6, 90

quality issues, 3-4, 50

supply chain integration software, 81-82

technological innovations, 44, 65, 88, 92

transportation, 4, 31, 57, 94

see also Efficiency

Cost reduction, 17, 18, 21, 26, 28, 32, 33, 34, 54-56, 66, 109

activity-based costing, 54-55

communications, 73-74

Internet, 73

life cycle, 24

manufacturing extension centers and technical resource providers (MEC/TRPs), 100

materials, 24, 29, 54, 57, 73

SCORE, 20-21

specialization, 16

training, 31, 87

transaction costs, 33

transportation, 4, 31, 34, 52, 56, 74

Customer selection, 8, 46-48, 68, 78, 80, 94-96, 97

Customized products and services, 2, 5, 13, 26, 28, 77, 89

see also After-sales support;

Documentation;

Recycling and disposal

D

DaimlerChrysler AG, 18, 21, 32

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, 100

Defense industries, 14-15, 17, 23, 44, 70, 83, 93

Definitions, 1, 14

integrated supply chain, 27, 132

glossary, 131-134

manufacturing, 16

original equipment manufacturer, 14, 133

partners/partnership, 59, 133

SME, 2, 13, 14, 46

successful supply chain participation, 3, 15

supply chain, 2-3, 22, 133

Delivery, 3, 5, 7-8, 19, 21-22, 26, 27, 29-30, 32, 35, 36, 56-57, 85

just-in-time manufacturing, 4, 5, 18, 28-29, 32, 47, 48, 51, 54, 56, 70, 132

performance metrics, 38, 39

time-to-market, 2, 5, 29, 39, 40, 51, 56-57, 73, 75, 82, 100

see also Customized products and services;

Transportation

Dell Computer Corporation, 28-31

Department of Defense, 83, 86, 100

Department of Energy, 86

Department of Justice, 63

DHL International, 56

Documentation, 2, 8, 13, 98

E

e-Commerce/e-Business, 5, 45-46, 47, 48, 53-54, 56, 57, 72-73, 78 80, 101-102, 108, 117, 132

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

Education and training, 8, 69, 78, 85-86, 87, 88, 97, 104, 109, 125 , 104, 109, 125

cost of, 31, 87

management, 90-91

manufacturing extension centers and technical resource providers (MEC / TRPs), 8, 99-103, 105-106, 107, 109

performance metrics, 39

supplier development, 35-36

university labs, technology licensing by, 86

Efficiency, 2, 13, 16, 39, 69

case studies, 18, 21, 28, 30, 31

innovation, 30

procurement, 17, 73

proprietary information, 70

proximity and, 90

Employment issues, 8, 97

labor contracts, 2

labor costs, 2, 4, 93

number employed by SMEs, 2, 13, 14, 94, 117, 120, 121

resistance to change, 37, 107

see also Education and training;

Management skills

English, use of, 4, 52-53, 109

Enterprise resource planning systems, 7, 31, 77-78, 82

Expertise, 2, 13, 15, 100

computer, 79, 85

managerial, 66, 67, 69

Extranets, 57-58, 132

F

Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), 14-15, 70

Federal Trade Commission, 63

FedEx Corporation, 31, 56, 74

Flexible manufacturing systems, 5, 39-40, 56, 57, 93, 101

Flow manufacturing, 86

Ford Motor Company, 21

Fujitsu America, 31

Functional integration, 19, 27, 33, 35, 36-37, 77

Funding

manufacturing extension centers and technical resource providers (MEC/TRPs), 8, 99, 102

small business set-asides, 35, 103-104

technological innovation, 88

G

General Motors Corporation, 17-18, 21, 32, 83

Georgia Manufacturing Extension Alliance/ Georgia Tech Economic Development Institute, 45, 49

Globalization, 3, 4, 9, 17, 21-22, 28, 31, 43, 52, 55, 89-91, 109

air freight, 56

bidding, 52

customer interaction, 64

outsourcing, 21-22

Goldratt Theory of Constraints, 107

H

Hazardous materials, 46, 48, 118, 120, 122

Highly-accelerated life testing, 51-52

Highly-accelerated stress screening, 51-52

Historical perspectives, 108

outsourcing, 16-17, 21

repositioning, 93-94

see also Case studies

I

IBM, 21

Information sharing, 22, 29, 33, 35, 36, 46, 69, 70, 74, 76, 77, 95, 96, 98

partnerships, 59, 61, 63

supply chain integration software, 7, 31, 81-82, 98

survey of SMEs, 117, 118, 120, 121, 123

see also Intellectual property

Information systems, 5, 6, 8, 56, 75-78, 100

see also Communications capabilities;

Computer technologies;

Education and training;

Internet technologies;

Telecommunications

Intel Corporation, 21, 29

Intellectual property, 30, 86

proprietary technologies, 2, 13, 29, 30, 62, 70, 86-87

International Standards Organization (ISO), 4, 46, 47, 48, 51, 52, 97, 101, 106, 118, 120, 121, 122, 125

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

Internet technologies, 5, 6, 7, 8, 30, 47, 48, 54, 57, 72-73, 74, 75, 77, 91, 98, 121, 132

auto industry outsourcing, 20

bidding, 52

e-Commerce/e-Business, 5, 45-46, 47, 48, 53-54, 56, 57, 72-73, 78-80, 101-102, 108, 117, 132

extranets, 57-58, 132

on-line commodity buying, 53-54

see also Web sites

Inventories, 5, 7-8, 21, 26, 31, 40, 56-57

computer tracking, 72, 75, 78, 81

cost factors, 5, 56-57

just-in-time manufacturing, 4, 5, 18, 28-29, 32, 47, 48, 51, 54, 56, 70, 132

obsolescence and, 40, 55, 56, 81

performance metrics, 39

supplier selection and development, 35-36

J

James Madison University, 102

Johnson Controls, Inc., 20, 21-22

Just-in-time manufacturing, 4, 5, 18, 28-29, 32, 47, 48, 51, 54, 56, 70, 132

L

Labor, see Employment issues

Language factors, see English, use of

Lear Corporation, 20, 21-22

Logistics, 4, 5, 9, 26, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 40, 56, 73

see also Delivery;

Inventories;

Transportation

M

Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award, 97, 106

Management skills, 6, 24-26, 43-44, 53, 64-71, 109

asset management, 17, 30, 36, 38, 39, 40

automobile industry, 19

customer selection, 8, 46-48, 68, 78, 80, 94-96, 97

Internet, 7

risk management, 32, 36, 38, 60-61, 62-63, 68, 89-90

strategic planning, 4, 9, 29, 34-35, 37, 38, 51, 59, 64-66, 82, 93-94, 96, 97, 109

Manufacturing extension centers and technical resource providers (MEC/TRPs), 2, 8, 99-103, 105-106, 107, 109

Manufacturing Extension Partnership, 99-100

Manufacturing Innovation Center, 102

Manufacturing processes, 8, 16, 19, 27, 30, 37, 52, 82, 83, 84, 85-86, 96, 98, 100

see also Process capabilities

Manufacturing technologies, 2, 6-8, 72-88

flexible manufacturing systems, 5, 39-40, 56, 57, 93, 101

flow manufacturing, 86

Mapping, 35-36, 37, 65, 81, 84, 105-106, 107, 124-125

Marketing strategies, 2, 5, 13, 21, 26, 30, 33, 44, 58, 66, 93, 94 , 101

activity-based costing, 54

demand fluctuations, 5, 21, 26, 33, 39, 56, 73, 75-77, 89, 92, 93, 94

foreign markets, 89-91;

see also Globalization

mass customization, 28

mutlifunction teams, 19

partnerships, 59

quality planning, 51

time-to-market, 2, 5, 29, 39, 40, 51, 56-57, 73, 75, 82, 100

see also Customized products and services

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 90-91

Materials requirements planning/manufacturing resource planning (MRP) , 46, 47, 48, 57, 73, 77, 81, 118, 120, 122, 132-133

see also Inventories

Metrics, 8, 38, 38-41, 59, 60, 67, 98, 121

Microsoft Corporation, 21, 29

N

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 86

National Association of Purchasing Management, 104

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

National Institute of Standards and Technology, 1, 14, 15

Manufacturing Extension Partnership, 99-100

Northeast Tier Ben Franklin Technology Center, 102

O

Opportunity costs, 31

Outsourcing, 1, 3, 14, 15, 43

case study, 17-22

defined, 133

logistics, 56

sole-source suppliers, 32, 36, 105

supplier selection, 34-36

see also Contracts and contracting

P

Partnerships, 5-6, 8, 23, 46, 59-63, 97, 118, 133

case studies, 18, 20, 30

contracts, 60-63

cost factors, 6, 90

defined, 59, 133

foreign companies, 90

information sharing, 59, 61, 63

virtual enterprises, 23, 29-30, 43, 71, 83, 101-102, 134

Performance metrics, see Metrics

Platform teams, 19

Process capabilities, 2, 6, 7, 13, 34, 36-37, 43, 72, 85-86

mapping, 35-36, 37, 65, 81, 84, 105-106, 107, 124-125

Simulation-Based Acquisition, 83

statistical process control (SPC), 40, 46, 47, 48, 51, 52, 97, 101 , 104, 118, 120, 122, 133

see also Manufacturing processes

Procter & Gamble, 26, 28

Production stoppages, 31-32

Product life cycles, 6, 18, 24, 26, 28, 50, 64

Product realization cycles, 28, 33, 123

auto industry outsourcing, 18, 19, 21

supplier development, 36

Product support

delivery time, 51, 56-57, 73, 75

documentation, 2, 8, 13, 98

see also After-sale support;

Recycling and disposal

Proprietary technologies, 2, 13, 29, 30, 62, 70, 86-87

Q

Quality issues, 3-4, 16, 28, 35, 50-52, 96, 101

benchmarking, 40, 41, 104

performance metrics, 8, 38, 38-41, 59, 60, 67, 98, 121

statistical process control (SPC), 40, 46, 47, 48, 51, 52, 97, 101 , 104, 118, 120, 122, 133

see also Standards

R

Recycling and disposal, 2, 13, 22, 36, 38

hazardous materials, 46, 48, 118, 120, 122

supply chain, defined, 3

Regulatory constraints, 101

antitrust, 63, 67

Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), 14-15, 70

Robert C. Byrd Institute, 1, 14, 15, 100-102

Risk, 6

global markets, 89-90

management, 32, 36, 38, 60-61, 62-63, 68, 89-90

partnerships, 59, 60-61, 62-63

production stoppages, 31-32

sharing, 27, 38, 59, 62-63

supplier selection, 35

see also Cost and cost-benefit factors

S

Service, 3, 4, 5, 17, 39, 57-58

see also After-sales support;

Customized products and services

Simulation-Based Acquisition, 83-84

Small business set-asides, 35, 103-104

Sole-source suppliers, 32, 36, 105

Standards, 50-52, 96

benchmarking, 40, 41, 104

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×

best practices, 8, 52, 103

design systems, 84

Federal Acquisition Regulations, 14-15

globalization and, 89, 90

International Standards Organization (ISO), 4, 46, 47, 48, 51, 52, 97, 101, 106, 118, 121, 122, 125

manufacturing extension centers and technical resource providers (MEC/TRPs), 8, 101, 103

partners, 30

performance metrics, 8, 38, 38-41, 59, 60, 67, 98, 121

Statistical process control (SPQ, 40, 46, 47, 48, 51, 52, 97, 101, 104, 118, 120, 122, 133

Stoppages, see Production stoppages

Strategic alliances, 8, 20-21, 63, 97

virtual enterprises, 23, 29-30, 43, 71, 83, 101-102, 134

see also Partnerships

Strategic planning, 4, 9, 29, 34-35, 37, 38, 51, 59, 64-66, 82, 96 , 97, 109

quality issues, 51

repositioning, 93-94

see also Market strategies

Supply chain integration software, 7, 31, 81-82, 98

Surveys, 15, 43, 45-49, 65, 94, 115-123

T

Technological innovations, 2, 6-8, 27, 43-49, 53, 65, 68, 72-88, 92, 94, 109

Competitiveness Review, 106-107

cost factors, 44, 65, 88, 92

manufacturing extension centers and technical resource providers (MEC/TRPs), 100, 101, 107, 109

obsolescence, 29, 30, 40, 55, 56, 81, 87

see also Computer technologies;

Information systems;

Intellectual property;

Internet technologies;

Telecommunications

Technological resource providers, see Manufacturing extension centers and technical resource providers (MEC/TRPs)

Telecommunications, 4, 6-7, 52, 73-74, 86, 90, 101

see also Internet

3M Corporation, 28

Time-to-market, 2, 5, 39, 56

Training, see Education and training

Transportation, 4, 5, 57, 81, 89, 90, 91, 93

cost factors, general, 4, 31, 57, 94

cost reduction, 4, 31, 34, 52, 56, 74

see also Delivery

U

United Technologies Corporation, 22, 53

V

Value-added, 2, 4, 16-17, 33, 37, 55-56, 94, 100, 102

activity-based costing, 54-55

Virginia's Manufacturing Innovation Center, 102

Virtual enterprises, 23, 29-30, 43, 71, 83, 101-102, 134

W

Wal-Mart, 26, 28

Waste management, see Recycling and disposal

Web sites, 91, 100

collaborative engineering, 84

creation of, 7, 58, 73, 79-80, 57-58, 78-80

for SMEs, general, 5, 49, 57-58, 71, 73, 78, 84, 91, 93, 109

see also Internet technologies

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 142
Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 143
Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 144
Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 145
Suggested Citation:"Index." National Research Council. 2000. Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6369.
×
Page 146
Surviving Supply Chain Integration: Strategies for Small Manufacturers Get This Book
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The managed flow of goods and information from raw material to final sale also known as a "supply chain" affects everything--from the U.S. gross domestic product to where you can buy your jeans. The nature of a company's supply chain has a significant effect on its success or failure--as in the success of Dell Computer's make-to-order system and the failure of General Motor's vertical integration during the 1998 United Auto Workers strike.

Supply Chain Integration looks at this crucial component of business at a time when product design, manufacture, and delivery are changing radically and globally. This book explores the benefits of continuously improving the relationship between the firm, its suppliers, and its customers to ensure the highest added value.

This book identifies the state-of-the-art developments that contribute to the success of vertical tiers of suppliers and relates these developments to the capabilities that small and medium-sized manufacturers must have to be viable participants in this system. Strategies for attaining these capabilities through manufacturing extension centers and other technical assistance providers at the national, state, and local level are suggested.

This book identifies action steps for small and medium-sized manufacturers--the "seed corn" of business start-up and development--to improve supply chain management. The book examines supply chain models from consultant firms, universities, manufacturers, and associations. Topics include the roles of suppliers and other supply chain participants, the rise of outsourcing, the importance of information management, the natural tension between buyer and seller, sources of assistance to small and medium-sized firms, and a host of other issues.

Supply Chain Integration will be of interest to industry policymakers, economists, researchers, business leaders, and forward-thinking executives.

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