National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 5 Sample Indicator Sets
Suggested Citation:"6 Issues and Challenges." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Second Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6381.
×

6
Issues and Challenges

Review of the sample indicator sets demonstrates the need for additional data collection and analysis to be conducted before the committee determines sets of indicators to recommend to the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Some obvious modifications that will be made include the following: (1) identification and evaluation of additional indicator sets; (2) reduction of the number of suggested measures for each set of indicators; (3) revision and clarification of the wording for specific suggested measures for each indicator category; (4) prioritization of the indicator set(s) that could be used to assess public opinion and reactions through focus group discussions; and (5) identification of appropriate data sources for each measure that is selected or recommendation of a new data collection effort to provide the desired information. The committee is also working to resolve a number of additional issues concerning the format, content, measurement, and dissemination of different indicators and their associated measures. These are summarized briefly below.

  1. How can a balance be achieved between indicator sets that affect change at the individual level and those that have a primary focus on the community?
  2. How can a balance be achieved that will ensure representation of both determinants and outcomes of health?
  3. How can indicators and measures be selected that are based on good science rather than public opinion?
  4. How can health measures, social determinants, and community measures be balanced in one set of indicators; is it more feasible to have three small sets of leading health indicators representative of each of these areas?
  5. How can focus be retained the way the public views health without losing sight of the science?
  6. How to maintain the importance of having indicators and related measures “shaped” by public comment?
  7. How can credibility and support for indicators and measures be maintained with individuals, groups, organizations, health professionals and others involved in the delivery of health care education and services to the general public and select population groups?
Suggested Citation:"6 Issues and Challenges." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Second Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6381.
×
  1. Are there more effective ways to deal with the health disparities issue?
  2. How do we deal with “end-of-life-issues” such as pain relief, nursing home care, and extreme measures to extend life?
  3. How do we deal with the growing field of genetics with respect to genetic susceptibility to disease, gene therapy, and the ability to manipulate genes and alter health status and outcomes?
  4. How do we deal with computer technology, data collection, data reporting, and the confidentiality of medical records and research?
  5. How do we deal with the issue that the leading health indicators imply some sort of normative standard for the achievement or performance (as do all the objectives for Healthy People 2010) that may or may not be acceptable to the general public or select population groups?
Suggested Citation:"6 Issues and Challenges." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Second Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6381.
×
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"6 Issues and Challenges." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Second Interim Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6381.
×
Page 44
Next: 7 Future Activities of IOM Committee »
Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Second Interim Report Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $47.00 Buy Ebook | $37.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

During Spring 1998, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) contracted with the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), Institute of Medicine (IOM) to conduct a multi phase project resulting in the development of sets of leading health indicators that would provide a 'face' for Healthy People 2010. Of equal or greater importance was the development of indicator sets that would attract and sustain public attention and motivation to engage in healthy behaviors. Development of such leading health indicators sets is intended to move the United States toward achievement of more positive health outcomes for the general population and for select population groups defined by race, ethnicity, gender, age, socio-economic status, level of education, and disability.

This second interim report presents a summary of the efforts of the IOM Committee on Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010 to develop sample sets of leading health indicators that would meet the requisite functions of attracting and sustaining attention and motivating engagement in healthier behaviors by the public. Reactions to this report and more specifically, to the potential leading health indicator sets and suggested measures, will be solicited from the public health community as well as representatives of diverse consumer audiences through electronic communication, regional public meetings convened by DHHS, focus group discussions with target populations, and other information-gathering techniques. Review of information from these various sources will be summarized in a third and final report for DHHS to be published in April 1999. The third report will also include the committee's final recommendations regarding the functions to be fulfilled by leading health indicators, will define specific criteria underlying the selection of leading health indicators, and will identify specific sets of leading health indicators to be promoted and monitored during the decade 2000 to 2010.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!