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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
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References

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IOM (Institute of Medicine). 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.


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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
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NRC (National Research Council). 1994. Science and Judgment in Risk Assessment. Committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants. Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
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Page 24
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
×
Page 25
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
×
Page 26
Next: Appendix A: Recommended Dietary Intakes for Individuals »
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The model for risk assessment of nutrients used to develop tolerable upper intake levels (ULs) is one of the key elements of the developing framework for Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). DRIs are dietary reference values for the intake of nutrients and food components by Americans and Canadians. The U.S. National Academy of Sciences recently released two reports in the series (IOM, 1997, 1998). The overall project is a comprehensive effort undertaken by the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI Committee) of the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB), Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences in the United States, with active involvement of Health Canada. The DRI project is the result of significant discussion from 1991 to 1996 by the FNB regarding how to approach the growing concern that one set of quantitative estimates of recommended intakes, the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs), was scientifically inappropriate to be used as the basis for many of the uses to which it had come to be applied.

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