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Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients (1998)

Chapter: Appendix C: Reference Heights and Weights for Children and Adults

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Reference Heights and Weights for Children and Adults." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
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Appendix C
Reference Heights and Weights for Children and Adults

Gender

Age

Median Body Mass Indexa

Reference Height (cm [in])

Reference Weight,b (kg [lb])

Male, female

2–6 mo

-

64 (25)

7 (16)

7–11 mo

-

72 (28)

9(20)

1–3 y

-

91 (36)

13 (29)

4–8 y

15.8

118 (46)

22 (48)

Male

9–13 y

18.5

147 (58)

40 (88)

14–18 y

21.3

174 (68)

64 (142)

19–30 y

24.4

176 (69)

76 (166)

Female

9–13 y

18.3

148 (58)

40 (88)

14–18 y

21.3

163 (64)

57 (125)

19–30 y

22.8

163 (64)

61 (133)

Adapted from: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), 1988–1994.

a In kg/m2.

b Calculated from median body mass index and median heights for ages 4–8 years and older.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Reference Heights and Weights for Children and Adults." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Reference Heights and Weights for Children and Adults." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Reference Heights and Weights for Children and Adults." Institute of Medicine. 1998. Dietary Reference Intakes: A Risk Assessment Model for Establishing Upper Intake Levels for Nutrients. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/6432.
×
Page 36
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The model for risk assessment of nutrients used to develop tolerable upper intake levels (ULs) is one of the key elements of the developing framework for Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). DRIs are dietary reference values for the intake of nutrients and food components by Americans and Canadians. The U.S. National Academy of Sciences recently released two reports in the series (IOM, 1997, 1998). The overall project is a comprehensive effort undertaken by the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI Committee) of the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB), Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences in the United States, with active involvement of Health Canada. The DRI project is the result of significant discussion from 1991 to 1996 by the FNB regarding how to approach the growing concern that one set of quantitative estimates of recommended intakes, the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs), was scientifically inappropriate to be used as the basis for many of the uses to which it had come to be applied.

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