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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Technical Report

No. 129

FEDERAL POLICIES TO FOSTER INNOVATION AND IMPROVEMENT IN CONSTRUCTED FACILITIES

(Summary of a Symposium)

Federal Facilities Council

Standing Committee on Research

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C.
1996

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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NOTICE

The Federal Facilities Council (FFC) is a continuing activity of the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE) of the National Research Council (NRC). The purpose of the FFC is to promote continuing cooperation among the sponsoring federal agencies and between the agencies and other elements of the building community in order to advance building science and technology—particularly with regard to the design, construction, and operation of federal facilities. Currently, 18 agencies sponsor the FFC:

Department of the Air Force, Office of the Civil Engineer

Department of the Air Force, Air National Guard

Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers

Department of the Army, Construction Engineering Research Laboratories

Department of Energy, Office of Project and Facilities Management

Department of the Navy, Naval Facilities Engineering Command

Department of State, Office of Foreign Buildings Operations

Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Construction Management

General Services Administration, Public Buildings Service

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Facilities Engineering Division

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Building and Fire Research Laboratory

National Endowment for the Arts, Design Arts Program

National Institutes of Health

National Science Foundation

Smithsonian Institution, Office of Facilities Services

U.S. Information Agency, Voice of America

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of Management

U.S. Postal Service, Facilities Department.

As part of its activities, the FFC periodically publishes reports like this one that summarize a symposium or have been prepared by committees of government employees. Since these committees are not appointed by the NRC, they do not make recommendations, and their reports are not reviewed and approved in accordance with usual NRC procedures. Consequently, the reports are considered FFC publications rather than NRC publications.

For further information on the FFC program or FFC reports, please write to: Director, Federal Facilities Council, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
×

FEDERAL FACILITIES COUNCIL STANDING COMMITTEE ON RESEARCH

Chairman

Dr. Ken P. Chong,

Structural Systems and Construction Processes Program, National Science Foundation

Members

Mr. John Leimanis,

Office of Foreign Buildings Operations, U.S. Department of State

Mr. Andrew R. Del Collo,

Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Department of the Navy

Mr. John Deponai III,

U.S. Army, Construction Engineering Research Laboratories

Mr. Bernie O. Deschanes,

Operations and Maintenance Branch, Air National Guard Readiness Center

Mr. Harry H. Ellis, Jr.,

Facilities Engineering Division, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Mr. Andrew J. Fowell,

Fire Safety and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Mr. Steve Gordey,

Operations and Maintenance Branch, Air National Guard Readiness Center

Mr. Joe McCarty,

Office of the Chief of Engineers, Army Corps of Engineers

Ms. Juanita Mildenberg,

Facilities Engineering Branch, National Institutes of Health

Mr. Sun Kin Mui,

Systems Branch, Facilities Division, Air National Guard Readiness Center

Ms. Judit A. Quasney,

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, U. S. Public Health Service

Mr. William Quinn,

Environmental Engineering Division, U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory

Mr. Lloyd H. Siegel,

Office of Construction Management, Department of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Robert C. Wilson,

Facilities Branch, Voice of America

Mr. John G. Yates,

Facilities Support Programs, U.S. Department of Energy

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
×

Program Committee Liaison Member

Mr. Noel Raufaste,

Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Non-Federal Liaison Members

Mr. William Brenner,

Construction Metrication Council, National Institute of Building Sciences

Mr. Deane Evans, Jr.,

American Institute of Architects, Research

Mr. Carl Magnell,

Research Division, Civil Engineering Research Foundation

Mr. Steven W. Polk,

Research Management Foundation, American Consulting Engineers Council

Mr. Jon C. Vanden Bosch,

Construction Industry Institute

Staff

Mr. Richard G. Little, Director,

Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment

Ms. Lynda L. Stanley, Director,

Federal Facilities Council

Ms. Susan K. Coppinger, Administrative Assistant

Ms. Lena B. Grayson, Program Assistant

Symposium Planning Committee

Dr. John W. Fisher, Chair,

Lehigh University

Dr. Ken P. Chong, P.E. Director,

Structural Systems and Construction Processes, National Science Foundation

Mr. Lloyd Duscha, Consulting Engineer,

Reston, VA

Mr. Stuart Knoop,

American Institute of Architects, Oudens & Knoop Architects

Mr. Stanley W. Smith, Consultant,

McLean, VA

Dr. Richard L. Tucker, Director,

Construction Industry Institute

Mr. Harry Zimmerman, Director,

Planning and Environmental Systems, Naval Facilities Engineering Command

Mr. Richard G. Little, Director,

Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
×

PREFACE

This nation's economy, security, and quality of life depend to a large extent on the vitality of its infrastructure. A society that neglects its physical infrastructure eventually will lose its ability to transport people, goods and information efficiently. That society will be less able to meet the needs of its citizens' for housing and employment, clean air and water, adequate energy, the control of disease, and a healthy economy.

In his plan, Technology for America's Economic Growth, the President calls for an integrated program of research and a cohesive implementation strategy designed to enhance the performance and longevity of the nation's deteriorating infrastructure. The U.S. construction industry is losing a long-held advantage in domestic and international markets due to foreign competition and a lack of research investment and application of advanced technologies and methodologies.

U.S. government agencies spend some $50 billion annually on the construction of facilities. This huge capital outlay provides a unique opportunity to leverage federal spending and serve as a catalyst in developing innovative construction management techniques, instituting more amenable procurement practices, and in fostering new technologies. As concluded in the 1992 Building Research Board publication, The Role of Public Agencies in Fostering New Technology and Innovation in Building, innovative government policies, programs, and practices are needed to create a cooperative, synergistic relationship between industry and government. Overseas, such relationships have demonstrated that both government and industry benefit through the improved quality and economic efficiency of the constructed product. In the

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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United States, the government needs to identify the barriers hindering technological innovation, consider the changes in policies and practices needed to eliminate these barriers, and develop incentives to foster innovation that will improve the performance of constructed facilities.

Fundamental changes to the system by which government acquires constructed facilities are indicated. As an example, public/private partnerships for technological innovation could better allocate both risks and rewards and encourage rather than inhibit the application of new technologies. Another is the use of a life-cycle cost approach which may in many instances be preferable to the prevailing general practice of selecting on the basis of low-bid first-cost.

To address these issues, the Federal Facilities Council of the National Research Council sponsored a symposium in June 1995 involving national and international experts from industry, academia and government, including representatives of federal organizations having a cognizant interest in facility construction. The objectives of the symposium were to identify the perceived barriers to innovation, review private sector and foreign government approaches to fostering innovation, and solicit recommendations for the policy changes needed to eliminate these barriers and where and how they should be implemented. This report includes summaries of the presentations given at the symposium and the participant recommendations developed in the workshops on “Leveraging Federal Capital Investment to Promote Innovation in the U.S. Construction Industry.”

Ken P. Chong

National Science Foundation

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1996. Federal Policies to Foster Innovation and Improvement in Constructed Facilities: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9065.
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