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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
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Technical Report

No. 126

THE USE OF PARTNERING IN THE FACILITIES DESIGN PROCESS

(Summary of a Symposium)

Federal Construction Council

Consulting Committee on Architecture and Architectural Engineering

NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS
Washington, D.C. 1994

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
×

NOTICE

The Federal Construction Council (FCC) is a continuing activity of the Building Research Board of the National Research Council (NRC). The purpose of the FCC is to promote continuing cooperation among the sponsoring federal agencies and between the agencies and other elements of the building community in order to advance building science and technology--particularly with regard to the design, construction, and operation of federal facilities. Currently, 18 agencies sponsor the FCC:

Department of the Air Force, Office of the Civil Engineer

Department of the Air Force, Air National Guard

Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers

Department of the Army, Construction Engineering Research Laboratories

Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation

Department of Energy, Office of Project and Facilities Management

Department of the Navy, Naval Facilities Engineering Command

Department of State, Office of Foreign Buildings Operations

Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Construction Management

General Services Administration, Public Buildings Service

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Facilities Engineering Office

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Building and Fire Research Laboratory

National Endowment for the Arts, Design Arts Program

National Science Foundation, Structural Systems and Construction Processes Program

Smithsonian Institution, Office of Facilities Service

U.S. Information Agency, Voice of America

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of Management

U.S. Postal Service, Facilities.

As part of its activities, the FCC periodically publishes reports like this one that have been prepared by committees of government employees. Since these committees are not appointed by the NRC, they do not make recommendations, and their reports are not reviewed and approved in accordance with usual NRC procedures. Consequently, the reports are considered FCC publications rather than NRC publications.

For further information on the FCC program or FCC reports, please write to: Executive Secretary, Federal Construction Council, Building Research Board, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20418.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
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FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION COUNCIL

CONSULTING COMMITTEE ON ARCHITECTURE AND ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING

Chairman

Daniel Hightower,

Division of Health Planning Facilities, U.S. Public Health Service

Members

James V. Allred,

Medical Facilities Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

James Binkley,

Facilities Department, U.S. Postal Service

Doyle Carrington,

Office of Construction Management, Department of Veterans Affairs

Daniel W. Duncan,

Architectural and Planning Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

John Earl,

Readiness Center, Air National Guard

Michael Golish,

U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories

Thomas Grooms,

Federal Design Improvement Program, National Endowment for the Arts

Rex Hellman,

Office of Foreign Buildings Operations, U.S. Department of State

Ronald Johnson,

Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Department of the Navy

James D. Long,

Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Department of the Navy

Joel T. Matulys,

Office of Engineering Services, U.S. Public Health Service

Dean Philpott,

Voice of America

Gary R. Radtke,

Facilities Planning and Construction, Indian Health Service

Donald L. Ritenout,

Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence Design Group, Department of the Air Force

John B. Scalzi,

Structures and Building Systems, National Science Foundation

Robert C. Wilson,

Facilities Branch, Voice of America

Staff

Henry A. Borger, Executive Secretary,

Federal Construction Council

Lena B. Grayson, Senior Secretary

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
×

PREFACE

The term “partnering” was coined by the Army Corps of Engineers in the late 1980s. It refers to the concept of substituting an atmosphere of cooperation among those involved in construction projects for the adversarial climate that traditionally has existed in construction; it also refers to the procedures by which a cooperative atmosphere is achieved through development of a team spirit on a project.

Although the idea that cooperation is better than confrontation is hardly new, the partnering concept, as expounded by the Corps of Engineers, was an important development because it provided a simple but effective method of achieving that goal. And apparently the concept came just at the right time and struck just the right chord. It has captured the imagination of construction leaders throughout the country, and it has gained acceptance in the industry at a phenomenal rate. It has been endorsed by many publications, including the Engineering News Record, and by such influential organizations as the Associated General Contractors. Many federal agencies also have embraced the concept.

Like so many of their counterparts in both the public and private sectors, the members of the Federal Construction Council (FCC) Consulting Committee on Architecture and Architectural Engineering are enthusiastic supporters of partnering. The committee members believe that the concept could, among other things, contribute to the application of W. Edwards Deming's “total quality management” principles to federal construction.

To date the partnering concept has been used almost entirely to improve the bilateral relationship between the owner and the construction contractor. In May 1993 a symposium was held at the National Academy of Sciences by the Consulting Committee on Architecture and Architectural Engineering to explore the feasibility of applying the partnering concept to the design phase.

This report comprises summaries of several papers presented at the symposium. The summaries were prepared by the speakers, and the opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the FCC. However, the papers are believed to be relevant and timely and to contain information that will be useful to the sponsoring federal agencies.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 1994. The Use of Partnering in the Facilities Design Process: Summary of a Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9227.
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