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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9436.
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References

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American Public Health Association (APHA), Association of Schools of Public Health, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, National Association of Country Health Officials, U.S. Conference of Local Health Officers, Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control. 1991. Healthy Communities 2000: Model Standards. 3rd Edition. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Public Health.


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Berkman, L. The Role of Social Relations in Health Promotion. Psychosomatic Medicine. 57:245–54.


Chamberlain, M.A. 1996. Health Communication: Making the Most of New Media Technologies. Journal of Health Communication. 1(1), 43–50. 1996

Coalition for Healthier Cities and Communities Progress Measures Action Team. 1997. Community Indicators: An Inventory. San Francisco, CA: Redefining Progress.

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Evans, R.G., and G.L. Stoddart. 1994. Producing Health, Consuming Health Care. In: Why Are Some People Health and Others Not? The Determinants of Health Populations. R.G. Evans, Baker, M.L., and T.R. Marmor (Eds.) New York: Aldine DeGruter.


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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9436.
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Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). 1992. Results of the 1990 Objectives for the Nation. November 11, 1992; Vol. 268, No. 18, copyright, 1992.

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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9436.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9436.
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Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9436.
×
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9436.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine. 1999. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9436.
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Healthy People is the nation's agenda for health promotion and disease prevention. The concept, first established in 1979 in a report prepared by the Office of the Surgeon General, has since been revised on a regular basis, and the fourth iteration, known as Healthy People 2010, will take the nation into the 21st century. Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2010: Final Report contains a number of recommendations and suggestions for the Department of Health and Human Services that address issues relevant to the composition of leading health indicator sets, data collection, data analysis, effective dissemination strategies, health disparities, and application of the indicators across multiple jurisdictional levels.

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