National Academies Press: OpenBook

Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities (1999)

Chapter: B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies

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Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
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Appendix B
Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies

To examine the comparability of environmental metrics reported (and presumably used by companies) within an industry, the committee surveyed the annual and environmental reports of semiconductor manufacturers (also found on the websites of the companies). Both the categories and units of measurements used by these companies are shown below. Table B-1 summarizes the categories of metrics covered by this small set of companies.

VOC (volatile organic compound) emissions (tons per year)

Hazardous organic and inorganic air pollutant emissions (tons)

NOx, CO, and SO2 emissions (tons per year)

Phospene emissions (tons)

Sulfuric acid emissions (tons)

Particulate emissions—particulate matter measuring 0–10 μm (tons)

Hazardous waste generation (thousand tons per year, recycled)

Solid waste recycling—cardboard, metal, paper, plastic, wood (percent recycled, tons per year), other

Chemical waste management—incineration, other treatment or disposal, recycling, energy recovery (percent)

Nonhazardous chemical waste management (tons, recycled)

Water use (millions of gallons per year, gallons per employee per day)

Wastewater reuse (total gallons and percent reuse)

Energy use (million kilowatt-hours)

Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×

Natural gas (million cubic feet)

Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III releases and off-site treatment (tons per year)

SARA Title III reportable chemicals by site—releases to air, transfers off-site (pounds)

Compliance issues (violations, fines, corrective actions)

Regulatory inspections and citations (number/$)

Award and recognition

Hazardous waste—disposal, recycled, recycle off-the-shelf chemicals, manufacturing waste (1,000s of pounds, percent, and manufacturing output)

Nonhazardous waste (1,000s of pounds, percent disposal, and recycled)

33/50 chemicals (percent of total used and total released to air, surface water; United States only)

SARA chemicals (1,000s of pounds and percent of total used that is released to air, land, and water; United States only)

Greenhouse gases (pounds of PFCs [perfluorocarbons] released or percent of total used)

Energy usage—electricity, gas, fuel, water (BTUs)

Recycled packaging

Inspections, fines, and violations

Awards and recognition

Motorola Corporation (http://www.mot.com/EHS/)

Hazardous waste—disposal, recycled, manufacturing waste (quantity and production unit)

Nonhazardous waste—disposal, recycled (quantity/production unit)

VOC air emissions (tons)

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) releases (millions of pounds)

33/50 chemicals (percent of total used and pounds that are released to air, surface water; United States only)

SARA chemicals (total 1,000s of pounds and percent of total used that is released to air, land and water; United States only)

Energy usage—electricity, gas, fuel (BTUs)

Water usage (gallons)

Awards

Inspections, fines, and violations

Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×

Hazardous waste generation and disposal (millions of pounds)

Nonhazardous solid waste recycling and disposal (millions of pounds)

ODSs (ozone-depleting substances; pounds)

TRI Chemicals (millions of pounds)

33/50 Chemicals (millions of pounds)

Global warming gases (PFC emissions)

Product/shipping packaging

Energy consumption and product use

National Semiconductor (http://www.national.com/environment/)

Hazardous waste

Nonhazardous waste

Electronic scrap

Chemical emissions (pounds/$1,000 sales)

33/50 Chemicals (total released in 1,000s of pounds)

Awards and recognition

ODSs

Water

Energy

Lucent Technologies (http://www.lucent.com/environment/)

Energy (millions of dollars in savings)

Air emissions

CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons)

VOCs

Hazardous waste disposal (millions of pounds)

Nonhazardous solid waste—recycling, disposal (millions of pounds)

ESH (environment, safety, and health) audits and corrective actions

Environmentally responsible manufacturing

Environmentally responsible packaging

Greenhouse gas emissions

Water usage

Remediation

Compliance

Awards and recognition

Hazardous waste (1,000s of pounds)

Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×

Nonhazardous solid waste (1,000s of pounds)

TRI emissions (1,000s of pounds, percent)

PFCs

Energy

Water

Packaging

Awards and recognition

Digital Equipment (http://www.digital.com/ehs/)

Hazardous waste—office, nonoffice (kilograms)

Nonhazardous solid waste (kilograms)

Compliance (notices of violation, penalties)

Energy consumption (million kilowatts-hours, kilowatt-hours/square foot)

Remediation

Air emissions (kilograms)

Water emissions (kilograms)

Toxic chemical use in production (kilograms)

VOC emissions (kilograms)

ODS usage—total CFC, hydrofluorocarbons, halon emitted (kilograms)

Total water use (millions of cubic meters)

Water use per employee (millions of cubic meters)

International Business Machines (http://www.ibm.com/ibm/environment/)

Hazardous waste reduction—closed-loop recycling, off-site recycling, treatment, and disposal (percent, tons)

Nonhazardous waste recycled (percent recycled, total generated)

PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) waste

33/50 Chemicals usage (percent)

SARA Title III releases and transfers (percent, tons)

Ozone concentration in California (parts per billion)

Energy (kilowatt-hours, gallons of fuel saved, tons of carbon dioxide emissions)

Environmental costs and savings

PFCs

Water (gallons/year)

Spills and releases

Fines and penalties

Recycled materials in new products (percent)

Recycled plastic use in new products (percent)

Landfill space used for IBM equipment dismantling operations (percent)

Awards and recognition

Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×
Rockwell International (http://www.rockwell.com/about/env/)

Hazardous waste generation (1,000s of tons, disposal type)

SARA emissions, releases, and transfers (millions of pounds, percent)

33/50 Emissions (millions of pounds, 1,000s of pounds, percent by chemical)

ODS chemicals (percent)

Fuel and energy usage

Carbon dioxide emissions (1,000s of tons)

Environmental costs

Environmental compliance (fines, violations, penalties)

Awards and recognition

Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×

TABLE B-1

Data Collected from Company Public ESH Annual Reports

 

NOTE: Highlighted column entries represent metrics tracked and reported by four or more companies.

Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×
Page 227
Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×
Page 228
Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×
Page 229
Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×
Page 230
Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×
Page 231
Suggested Citation:"B Current Reporting of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics by U.S. Semiconductor Companies." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 1999. Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Challenges and Opportunities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9458.
×
Page 232
Next: C Current Reporting and Use of Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics: Company Scale »
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Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics is a corporate-focused analysis that brings clarity and practicality to the complex issues of environmental metrics in industry. The book examines the metrics implications to businesses as their responsibilities expand beyond the factory gate--upstream to suppliers and downstream to products and services. It examines implications that arise from greater demand for comparability of metrics among businesses by the investment community and environmental interest groups. The controversy over what sustainable development means for businesses is also addressed.

Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics identifies the most useful metrics based on case studies from four industries--automotive, chemical, electronics, and pulp and paper--and includes specific corporate examples. It contains goals and recommendations for public and private sector players interested in encouraging the broader use of metrics to improve industrial environmental performance and those interested in addressing the tough issues of prioritization, weighting of metrics for meaningful comparability, and the longer term metrics needs presented by sustainable development.

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