National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age (2000)

Chapter: Appendix B: Briefers to the Committee

« Previous: Appendix A: Study Committee Biographies
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefers to the Committee." National Research Council. 2000. The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9601.
×

Page 261

Appendix B —
Briefers to the Committee

February 20–21, 1998

William Arms, Cornell University

Eileen Collins, National Science Foundation

Les Gasser, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (formerly at the National Science Foundation)

Trotter Hardy, College of William and Mary

Shira Perlmutter, U.S. Copyright Office

April 30–May 1, 1998

Jim Banister, Warner Brothers Online

Steven Benson, Paramount Digital Entertainment

Chris Cookson, Warner Brothers Motion Pictures

Peter Harter, Netscape

Eileen Kent, Consultant

Jim Kinsella, MSNBC

Bob Lambert, The Walt Disney Company

Jeff Lotspiech, IBM Almaden Research Center

Dean Marks, Time-Warner Records

David Pearce, Microsoft

Suzanne Scotchmer, University of California at Berkeley

Nathan Shedroff, Vivid Studios

Hal Varian, University of California at Berkeley

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefers to the Committee." National Research Council. 2000. The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9601.
×

Page 262

July 9–10, 1998

Scott Bennett, Yale University

Aubrey Bush, National Science Foundation

Dan Duncan, Information Industry Association

Julie Fenster, Time Inc.

Anne Griffith, Software Publishers Association

Carol Henderson, American Library Association

Tom Kalil, The White House, National Economic Council

Deanna Marcum, Council on Library and Information Resources

Steve Metalitz, International Intellectual Property Alliance

Tony Miles, National Science Foundation

Patricia Schroeder, Association of American Publishers

Jim Snyder, AT&T Research

Tony Stonefield, Global Music Outlet

Jim Taylor, Microsoft

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefers to the Committee." National Research Council. 2000. The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9601.
×
Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefers to the Committee." National Research Council. 2000. The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9601.
×
Page 262
Next: Appendix C: Networks: How the Internet Works »
The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $75.00 Buy Ebook | $59.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Imagine sending a magazine article to 10 friends-making photocopies, putting them in envelopes, adding postage, and mailing them. Now consider how much easier it is to send that article to those 10 friends as an attachment to e-mail. Or to post the article on your own site on the World Wide Web.

The ease of modifying or copying digitized material and the proliferation of computer networking have raised fundamental questions about copyright and patent--intellectual property protections rooted in the U.S. Constitution. Hailed for quick and convenient access to a world of material, the Internet also poses serious economic issues for those who create and market that material. If people can so easily send music on the Internet for free, for example, who will pay for music?

This book presents the multiple facets of digitized intellectual property, defining terms, identifying key issues, and exploring alternatives. It follows the complex threads of law, business, incentives to creators, the American tradition of access to information, the international context, and the nature of human behavior. Technology is explored for its ability to transfer content and its potential to protect intellectual property rights. The book proposes research and policy recommendations as well as principles for policymaking.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!