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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G International Affairs Strategic Goals." National Research Council. 1999. The Pervasive Role of Science, Technology, and Health in Foreign Policy: Imperatives for the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9688.
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APPENDIX G
International Affairs Strategic Goals1

  • Regional Stability: Strengthen the security of the United States and prevent instabilities from threatening the vital and important interests of the United States and its allies.

  • Weapons of Mass Destruction: Reduce the threat to the United States and its allies from weapons of mass destruction.

  • Open Markets: Open world markets to increase trade and free the flow of goods, services, and capital.U.S. Exports: Expand U.S. exports to $1.2 trillion early in the twenty-first century.

  • Global Growth and Stability: Increase global economic growth and stability.

  • Economic Development: Promote broad-based growth in developing and transitional economies to raise standards of living and lessen disparities of wealth within and among countries.

1  

 Goals with STH content are highlighted in bold.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G International Affairs Strategic Goals." National Research Council. 1999. The Pervasive Role of Science, Technology, and Health in Foreign Policy: Imperatives for the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9688.
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  • American Citizens: Protect the safety and security of American citizens who travel and live abroad.

  • Travel and Migration: Manage fairly and effectively the entry of immigrants and foreign visitors into the United States.

  • International Crime: Minimize the impact of international crime on the United States and its citizens.

  • Illegal Drugs: Reduce the entry of illegal drugs into the United States.

  • Counterterrorism: Reduce the number and impact of international terrorist attacks, especially on the United States and its citizens.

  • Democracy and Human Rights: Open political systems and societies to democratic practices, the rule of law, good governance, and respect for human rights.

  • Humanitarian Assistance: Prevent or minimize the human costs of conflict and natural disasters.

  • Environment: Secure a sustainable global environment and protect the United States and its citizens from the effects of international environmental degradation.

  • Population: Achieve a sustainable world population.

  • Health: Protect human health and reduce the spread of infectious diseases.

SOURCE: ''United States Strategic Plan for International Affairs, First Revision," released by the Office of Resources, Plans, and Policy, U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C., February 1999. See http://www.state.gov/www/global/general_foreign_policy/99_stratplan_toc.html_foreign_policy/99_stratplan_toc.html>.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G International Affairs Strategic Goals." National Research Council. 1999. The Pervasive Role of Science, Technology, and Health in Foreign Policy: Imperatives for the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9688.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G International Affairs Strategic Goals." National Research Council. 1999. The Pervasive Role of Science, Technology, and Health in Foreign Policy: Imperatives for the Department of State. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9688.
×
Page 102
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Issues involving science, technology, and health (STH) have moved to the forefront of the international diplomatic agenda. Other vital issues linked to technological developments pervade longer-range foreign policy concerns. Thus, STH considerations are often central to the Department of State's bilateral and multilateral interactions with other governments. STH aspects play a large role in discussions of such critical topics as nuclear nonproliferation, use of outer space, population growth, adequate and safe food supply, climate change, infectious diseases, energy resources, and competitiveness of industrial technologies. In addressing these issues, expert STH knowledge is essential to the anticipation and resolution of problems and to the achievement of foreign policy goals. The Department, recognizing that it requires strengthened capabilities to address such an array of topics, asked for suggestions by the National Research Council as to how it could better deal with foreign policy issues with STH content.

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