National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 6 Implications for Research and Linking Research to Policy and Practice
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine and . 1999. Risks and Opportunities: Synthesis of Studies on Adolescence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9721.
×

References

Backman, J.G., et al. 1998 National survey results on drug use. In Monitoring the Future Study 1975–1997. Volume I, Secondary School Students. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Blum, R.W. 1998 Healthy youth development as a model for youth health promotion: A review. Journal of Adolescent Health 22:368–375.

Brooks-Gunn, J., et al. 1995 New Social Indicators of Child Well-Being. The Family and Child Well-Being Network. Vienna, Austria: European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research.

Brindis, C.D., et al. 1998 Improving Adolescent Health: An Analysis and Synthesis of Health Policy Recommendations. Full Report, San Francisco: National Adolescent Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco.

Brofenbrenner, U. 1979 The Ecology of Human Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bureau of the Census 1965 Estimates of the population of the United States by single years of age, color, and sex: 1900 to 1959. Current Population Reports Series P-25, No. 311. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Commerce.

1974 Estimates of the population of the United States by age, sex, and race: April 1, 1960 to July 1, 1973. Current Population Reports Series P-25, No. 519. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Commerce.

1982 Preliminary estimates of the population of the United States by age, sex, and race: 1970 to 1981. Current Population Reports Series P-25, No. 917. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Commerce.

Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine and . 1999. Risks and Opportunities: Synthesis of Studies on Adolescence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9721.
×

1996 Population projections of the United States by age, sex, and race and Hispanic origin: 1995 to 2050. Current Population Reports Series P-25, No. 1130. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Commerce.

1999 Unpublished estimate tables for 1980 to 1997. U.S. Bureau of the Census web site. Available electronically: www.census.gov.

Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development 1995 Great Transitions: Preparing Adolescents for a New Century. Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. New York: Carnegie Corporation of New York.


Dryfoos, J.G. 1998 Safe Passage: Making It Through Adolescence in a Risky Society: What Parents, Schools and Communities Can Do. New York: Oxford University Press.

Duncan, G.J., and J. Brooks-Gunn, eds. 1997 Consequences of Growing Up Poor. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.


Family and Child Well-Being Research Network 1999 Family and Child Well-Being Research Network. Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Web site: http://famchild.wsu.edu. Contact: Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Center for Population Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 6100 Executive Blvd., Rm. 8B13, Bethesda, MD 20892. Telephone: (301) 496-74.

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics 1997 America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.


Hauser, R.M., B.V. Brown, and W.R. Prosser, eds. 1997 Indicators of Children's Well-Being. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.


Moore, K.A. 1998 Criteria for indicators of child well-being. In Indicators of Children's Well-Being. R.M. Hauser, B.V. Brown, and W.R. Prosser, eds. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.


National Research Council 1993 Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings. Panel on High Risk Youth, National Research Council. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

1996 Youth Development and Neighborhood Influences: Challenges and Opportunities. Committee on Youth Development. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Newacheck P., M. McManus, and C. Brindis 1990 Financing health care for adolescents: Problems, prospects and proposals. Journal of Adolescent Health Care 11(5):398–403.


Resnick, M.D., et al. 1997 Protecting adolescents from harm. Findings from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health. Journal of the American Medical Association 278(10):823–832.


Small, S.A. 1990 Preventive Programs That Support Families With Adolescents. Working paper of the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. New York : Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine and . 1999. Risks and Opportunities: Synthesis of Studies on Adolescence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9721.
×
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"References." Institute of Medicine and . 1999. Risks and Opportunities: Synthesis of Studies on Adolescence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9721.
×
Page 70
Next: Appendix: Institute of Medicine/National Research Council Reports Relevant to Adolescence »
Risks and Opportunities: Synthesis of Studies on Adolescence Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $29.00 Buy Ebook | $23.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

This report constitutes one of the first activities of the Forum on Adolescence, a cross-cutting activity of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council of the National Academies. Established under the auspices of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, the forum's overaching mission is to synthesize, analyze, and evaluate scientific research on critical national issues that relate to youth and their families, as well as to disseminate research and its policy and programmatic implications. The goals of the forum are to: (1) review and establish the science base on adolescent health and development and make efforts to foster this development; (2) identify new directions and support for research in this area, approaching research as a resource to be developed cumulatively over time; (3) showcase new research, programs, and policies that have demonstrated promise in improving the health and well-being of adolescents; (4) convene and foster collaborations among individuals who represent diverse viewpoints and backgrounds, with a view to enhancing the quality of leadership in this area; and (5) disseminate research on adolescence and its policy implications to a wide array of audiences, from the scientific community to the lay public.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!