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Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice (2001)

Chapter: Appendix C: Workshop Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
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APPENDIX C

Workshop Agendas

WORKSHOP ON EDUCATION AND DELINQUENCY

October 2, 1998

8:00-8:15 a

Welcoming Remarks

Joan McCord, Workshop Chair

School Environment and Social Climate

8:15-9:00 a

School Environment and Effects on Learning

John Devine, New York University

Q&A/Discussion

9:00-10:00 a

School Safety Security Measures (e.g., metal detectors, guards, etc.)

Kenneth Trump, National School Safety and Security Services

Q&A/Discussion

10:00-10:15 a

Break

10:15-11:00 a

Tracking, Social Promotions, and Other Educational Organizational Issues

Mark Berends, RAND Corporation

Q&A/Discussion

11:00-11:45 a

High-Risk Young Adolescents in Learning Environments

Thomas Dishion, University of Oregon

Q&A/Discussion

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×

11:45-12:30 p

Lunch (Lunch to be served in meeting room)

12:30-1:15 p

Using the Framework of Risk and Resilience to Understand the Developmental Trajectories of Students who are Expelled from School

Gale Morrison, University of California, Santa Barbara

Q&A/Discussion

School Performance, Intervention, and Delinquency

1:15-2:00 p

Overview of Educational Performance and Delinquency

Rolf Loeber, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Q&A/Discussion

2:00-2:45 p

Approaches to Improve School Performance

Margaret Beale Spencer, University of Pennsylvania

Q&A/Discussion

2:45-3:00 p

Break

3:00-3:45 p

Motivation, School Readiness, and Teacher Preparation

Carol Dweck, Columbia University

Q&A/Discussion

3:45-4:15 p

Commentary

Doris Entwisle, Johns Hopkins University

4:15-5:00 p

General Discussion

5:00 p

Meeting Adjourns

JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM WORKSHOP: FROM ENTRY TO AFTER CARE

DAY ONE

January 21, 1999

8:00-8:15 a

Welcoming Remarks

Cathy Spatz Widom, Workshop Chair

8:15-9:00 a

Theory and Scope of the Juvenile Court

Jay Blitzman, Judge, Juvenile Court, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Q&A/Discussion

9:00-9:45 a

Breaking the Cycle of Youth Violence: Problem Solving Approaches

David Kennedy, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Q&A/Discussion

9:45-10:00 a

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×

10:00-10:45 a

Policing of Juveniles

Robert Worden and Stephanie Myers, The University at Albany

Q&A/ Discussion

10:45-11:30 a

Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues in Pretrial Detention of Juveniles

Kimberly Kempf-Leonard, University of Missouri, St. Louis

Q&A/Discussion

11:30 a-12:45 p

Lunch

12:45-2:15 p

Transfer Mechanisms: Issues, Practices, and Consequences

Legal Overview: Jeff Fagan, School of Public Health, Columbia University

Waivers: Consequences and Empirical Issues: Donna Bishop, University of Central Florida

Policy, Law, and Theory: Jeff Fagan, School of Public Health, Columbia University

Q&A/Discussion

2:15-2:30 p

Break

2:30-3:15 p

Sentencing Issues and Correctional Consequences

Barry Feld, University of Minnesota

Q&A/Discussion

3:15-4:00 p

Effectiveness of Programs for Institutionalized Delinquents

Mark Lipsey, Vanderbilt University

Q&A/Discussion

4:00-4:45 p

The Effects of Incarceration on Juveniles

Lee Underwood, The Pines Residential Treatment Center

Q&A/Discussion

5:00 p

Reception and Dinner will follow the meeting for panel members and workshop speakers

DAY TWO

January 22, 1999

8:15-8:30 a

Opening remarks

8:30-9:15 a

Alternatives to Incarceration

Phil Harris, Temple University

Q&A/Discussion

9:15-10:00 a

What Happens After Incarceration? Issues Regarding Aftercare

David Altschuler, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Q&A/Discussion

10:00-10:15 a

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×

10:15-11:00 a

The Federal Role in the Juvenile Justice System: The Policy Debate

Federal Legislation

Mary Didier, U.S. Sentencing Commission

Juveniles in the Federal System

Holly MacKay, U.S. Sentencing Commission

Q&A/Discussion

11:00-11:45 a

Decriminalizing Status Offenders and the “Hidden System”

Ira Schwartz, University of Pennsylvania

Q&A/Discussion

11:45 a-12:15 p

General Discussion

12:15 p

Workshop Adjourns

WORKSHOP ON DEVELOPMENTAL ISSUES

May 3, 1999

8:30-9:00 a

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Joan McCord, Workshop Chair

9:00-10:00 a

Development of Language and Cognition

Ellen Markman, Stanford University

Q&A/Discussion

10:00-11:00 a

Development of Self Perceptions

Daphna Oyserman, University of Michigan

Q&A/Discussion

11:00-11:15 a

Break

11:15 a-12:15 p

Development of Family Interactions and Peer Relationships

Gregory Pettit, Auburn University

Q&A/Discussion

12:15-1:30 p

Lunch and Luncheon speaker

Laurence Steinberg, Temple University

Director, Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

1:30-2:35 p

Developmental Issues on Motivation

Mark Lepper, Stanford University

Q&A/Discussion

2:30-3:30 p

Emergence of Skills to Regulate Emotions

Cynthia Stifter, Pennsylvania State University

Q&A/Discussion

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×

3:30-3:45 p

Break

3:45-4:45 p

Critical Points for Successful Development

Kenneth Maton, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Q&A Discussion

4:45-5:45 p

Developmental Perspectives on Deviance

Rolf Loeber, Western Psychiatric Institute

Q&A/Discussion

5:45-6:00 p

General Discussion

6:00 p

Meeting adjourns

RACIAL DISPARITY WORKSHOP

June 29, 1999

8:30 am

Opening Remarks

9:00- 9:45 a

Economic and Social Inequality

Robert Bursik, University of Missouri, St. Louis (canceled)

Steven Messner, University of Albany, State University of New York

Ted Chiricos, Florida State University

9:45-10:30 a

Discussion

10:30-10:45 a

Break

10:45-11:30 a

Values, Beliefs and Situational Determinants of Offending

Howard Pinderhughes, University of California at San Francisco

William Oliver, Indiana University

Philip Cook, Duke University

11:30 a-12:15 p

Discussion

12:15-12:45 p

Pick up lunch

12:45-1:30 p

Assessing Racial Disparity in Juvenile Residential Placements and in Sentencing: Factors Affecting Data Quality

Laurie Schwede, U.S. Bureau of the Census Q&A

1:30-2:00 p

Alternative Perspectives on Trends

Delbert Elliott, University of Colorado, Boulder

Lawrence Greenfeld, Bureau of Justice Statistics

2:00-2:30 p

Discussion

2:30-2:45 p

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×

2:45-3:15 p

Differential Processing and Establishing Bias

George Bridges, University of Washington

David Harris, University of Toledo College of Law

3:15-3:45 p

Discussion

3:45-4:30 p

Implications for Future Research

4:30 p

Workshop Adjourns

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×
Page 349
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×
Page 350
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×
Page 351
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×
Page 352
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×
Page 353
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agendas." National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2001. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9747.
×
Page 354
Next: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches »
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Even though youth crime rates have fallen since the mid-1990s, public fear and political rhetoric over the issue have heightened. The Columbine shootings and other sensational incidents add to the furor. Often overlooked are the underlying problems of child poverty, social disadvantage, and the pitfalls inherent to adolescent decisionmaking that contribute to youth crime. From a policy standpoint, adolescent offenders are caught in the crossfire between nurturance of youth and punishment of criminals, between rehabilitation and "get tough" pronouncements. In the midst of this emotional debate, the National Research Council's Panel on Juvenile Crime steps forward with an authoritative review of the best available data and analysis. Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice presents recommendations for addressing the many aspects of America's youth crime problem.

This timely release discusses patterns and trends in crimes by children and adolescents--trends revealed by arrest data, victim reports, and other sources; youth crime within general crime; and race and sex disparities. The book explores desistance--the probability that delinquency or criminal activities decrease with age--and evaluates different approaches to predicting future crime rates.

Why do young people turn to delinquency? Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice presents what we know and what we urgently need to find out about contributing factors, ranging from prenatal care, differences in temperament, and family influences to the role of peer relationships, the impact of the school policies toward delinquency, and the broader influences of the neighborhood and community. Equally important, this book examines a range of solutions:

  • Prevention and intervention efforts directed to individuals, peer groups, and families, as well as day care-, school- and community-based initiatives.
  • Intervention within the juvenile justice system.
  • Role of the police.
  • Processing and detention of youth offenders.
  • Transferring youths to the adult judicial system.
  • Residential placement of juveniles.

The book includes background on the American juvenile court system, useful comparisons with the juvenile justice systems of other nations, and other important information for assessing this problem.

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