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Suggested Citation:"Appendix 7. Resources." National Research Council. 2000. Mathematics Education in the Middle Grades: Teaching to Meet the Needs of Middle Grades Learners and to Maintain High Expectations: Proceedings of a National Convocation and Action Conferences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9764.
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Page 253
Suggested Citation:"Appendix 7. Resources." National Research Council. 2000. Mathematics Education in the Middle Grades: Teaching to Meet the Needs of Middle Grades Learners and to Maintain High Expectations: Proceedings of a National Convocation and Action Conferences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9764.
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Page 254
Suggested Citation:"Appendix 7. Resources." National Research Council. 2000. Mathematics Education in the Middle Grades: Teaching to Meet the Needs of Middle Grades Learners and to Maintain High Expectations: Proceedings of a National Convocation and Action Conferences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9764.
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Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Appendix 7. Resources." National Research Council. 2000. Mathematics Education in the Middle Grades: Teaching to Meet the Needs of Middle Grades Learners and to Maintain High Expectations: Proceedings of a National Convocation and Action Conferences. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9764.
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Page 256

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Curriculumintegration: proceeding with cautious optimism. (1996~. Middle School foavrnal, September 1996, pp. 3-26. Alexander, W.M. (1965~. The junior high: A changing view. In G. Hass & K Wiles (Eds.), Readings in cavrric?`l?`m. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Arnold, I. (1993~. A responsive curriculum for emerging adolescents. In T. Dickinson (Ed.), Readings in middle school cavrric?`l?`m: A continuing conversation. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. Beane, I.A. (1993~. A middle school cavrric?`l?`m: From rhetoric to reality (2nd eddy. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. Bitter, G.G., & Hatfield, M.M. (1998~. The role of technology in the middle grades. In L. Leutzinger (Ed.), Mathematics in the Middle (pp. 36-41~. Reston, VA National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. (1990~. Tavrning points: PreparingAmerican youth for the 21st century (abridged version). Washington, DC: Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. Chiu, M.M. (1996~. Exploring the origins, uses, and interactions of student intuitions: Compar- ing the lengths of paths. journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 27~4), 478-504. Clark, T.A., Bickel, WE., & Lacey, R.A. (1993~. Transforming education foryoa`ng adolescents: insights for practitioners from the Lilly Endowment's middle grades impovement program, 1987-1990. New York: Education Resources Group. Council of Chief State School Officers, & Carnegie Corporation of New York. (1995~. The middle school: Professional development for high staidest achievement. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers. Davis, B. (1997~. Listening for differences: An evolving conception of mathematics teaching. foavrnalfor Research in Mathematics Education, 28~3), 355-376. r`~.~.~.r . I A. RESOURCES English, L., Cudmore, D., & Tilley, D. (1998~. Problem posing and critiquing: How it can happen in your classroom. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 4~2), 124-129. Felner, R.D., et al. (1995~. The process and impact of school reform and restructuring for the middle years: A longitudinal study of Turning Points-based comprehensive school change. In R. Takanishi & D. Hamburg (Eds.), Frontiers in the education of young adolescents. New York: Carnegie Corporation. Felner, RD., et al. (1993~. Restructuring the ecology of the school as an approach to preven- tion during school transitions: Longitudinal follow-ups and extensions of the School Transi- tional Environment Project (STEP). Prevention in Hangman Services, 10, 103-136. Felner, R.D., Jackson, A.W., Kasak, D., Mulhall, P., Brand, S., & Flowers, N. (1997~. The impact of school reform for the middle years: Longitu- dinal study of a network engaged in Tavrning- Points-based comprehensive school transfor- mation. Phi Delta Kappan. Friel, S.N., Bright, G.W., & Curcio, F.R (1997~. Understanding students' understanding of graphs. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 3 (3), 224-227. George, P.S., & Alexander, W.M. (1993~. The exemplary middle school (2nd eddy. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Jackson, A.W. et al. (1993~. Adolescent develop- ment and educational policy: Strengths and weaknesses of the knowledge base. foavrnal of Adolescent Medicine, 14, 172-189. Lamon, S.J. (1993~. Ratio and proportion: Connecting content and children's thinking. foavrnalfor Research in Mathematics Education? 24~1), 41-61. Lara, I. (1995~. Second-langavage learners and middle school reform: A case study of a school in transition. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers.

Leinwand, Sol. (1998~. Classroom realities we do not often talk about. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 3~5), 330-331. Lewis, A C. (1995~. Believing in ourselves, progress and straggle in urban middle school reform, 1989-1995. New York: Edna McConnell Clark Foundation. Lipsitz, I., Jackson, A.W., & Austin, LM. (1997~. What works in middle-grades school reform. Phi Delta Kappan 78~7), 517-519. Lipsitz, I., Mizzell, M.H., Jackson, A.W., & Austin, LM. (1997~. Speaking with one voice: A manifesto for middle-grades reform. Phi Delta Kappan, 78~7), 533-540. Manauchureri, A., Enderson, M.C., & Pugnucco, LA. (1998~. Exploring geometry with technol- ogy. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 3~6), 436-443. McEwin, C.K., & Dickinson, T.S. (1995~. The professional preparation of middle level teachers: Profiles of sa~ccessf?'l programs. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. McEwin, C.K, Dickinson, T.S., & Jenkins, D.M. (1996~. America's middle schools: Practices and progress: A 25 year perspective. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. (1993~. The early adolescence/ generalist standards. San Antonio, TX: National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. National Middle School Association. (1995~. This we believe: Developmentally responsive middle level schools. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. National Center for Educational Statistics. (1996~. P?`rsaving excellence: A study of U.S. eighth- grade mathematics and science achievement in international context. Washington, DC: Author. National Center for Educational Statistics. (1997~. P?`rsaving excellence: A study of U.S. foavrth- grade mathematics and science achievement in international context. Washington, DC: Author. Oldfather, P., & McCaughlin, H.~. (1993~. Gaining and losing voice: A longitudinal study of students' continuing impulse to learn across elementary and middle level contexts. Research in Middle Level Education, Fall 1993, 1-25. Phillips, E., & Lappan, G. (1998~. Algebra: The first gate. In L Leutziner (Ed.), Mathematics in the Middle (pp. 10-19~. Reston, VA National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. APPE N DIX 6 Reese, C.M., Miller, KE., Mazzeo, I., & Dossey, I. (1997) NAEP 1996 mathematics report card for the national and the states: Findings from the National Assessment of Ed ?Y cationaI Progress. Washington, DC: National Center for Educa- tion Statistics. Reys, By. (1994~. Promoting number sense in the middle grades. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 1~2), 114-120. Reys, R E. (1998~. Computation versus number sense. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 4~2), 110-119. Reys,R.E.,Reys,B.~.,Barnes,D.E.,Beem,]. K, Lapan, R T., & Papick, I. I. (1998~. Stan- dards-based middle school mathematics: What do students think? In L. Leutzinger (Ed.), Mathematics in the Middle (pp. 153-157~. Reston, VA National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Romberg, T. A. (1998~. Designing middle school mathematics materials using problems created to help students progress from informal reasoning to formal mathematical reasoning. In L Leutzinger (Ed.), Mathematics in the Middle (pp. 107-119~. Reston, VA National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Rosenzweig, S. (1997~. The five foot bookshelf: Readings on middle-level education and reform. Phi Delta Kappan 78~7), 551-556. Silver, E.A., & Cal, J. (1996~. An analysis of arithmetic problem posing by middle school students. foavrnal for Research in Mathematics Education, 27~5 ), 521-539. Silver, E.A., & Kenney, P. (1993~. An examination of relationships between 1990 NAEP math- ematics items for grade 8 and selected themes from the NCTM standards. [ournalfor Research in Mathematics Education, 24~2), 159- 167. Silver, E.A., Mamona-Downs, J., Leung, S.S., & Kenney, P. A. (1996~. Posing mathematics problems: An exploratory study. {ournalfor Research in Mathematics Education, 27~3), 293- 309. Silver, E. A., Shapiro, L J., & Deutsch, A. (1993~. Sense making and the solution of division problems involving remainders: An examina- tion of middle school students' solution processes and their interpretations of solu- tions. foavrnal for Research in Mathematics Education, 24~2), 117-135.

Silver, E.A. (1998~. Improving mathematics in middle school: Lessons from TIMSS and related research. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education. Swafford, I.O., [ones, G.A., & Thornton, C.A. (1997~. Increased knowledge in geometry and instructional practice. foavrnalfor Research in Mathematics Education, 28~4), 467-483. Swaim, I.H., & Stefanich, G.P. (1996~. Meeting the standards: Improving middle level teacher education. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association. Task Force on Education of Young Adolescents. (1989~. Tavrning points: PreparingAmerican youth for the 21st century. New York: Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development. RESOURCES Warrington, M. (1997~. How children think about division with fractions. Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 2~6), 390-397. Wheelock, A. (1992~. Crossing the tracks: How "a`ntracking" can save America's schools. New York: New Press. Wheelock, A. (1995~. Standards-based reform: What does it mean for the middle grades? New York: Edna McConnell Clark Foundation Program for Student Achievement. Yershalmy, M. (1997~. Designing representa- tions: Reasoning about functions of two variables. foavrnal for Research in Mathematics Education, 28~4), 431-466. Zucker, A A. (1998~. Middle grades mathematics education: Questions and answers. Arlington, VA SRI International.

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Mathematics Education in the Middle Grades: Teaching to Meet the Needs of Middle Grades Learners and to Maintain High Expectations In September 1998, the Math Science Education Board National held a Convocation on Middle Grades Mathematics that was co-sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the National Middle School Association, and the American Educational Research Association. The Convocation was structured to present the teaching of middle school mathematics from two points of view: teaching mathematics with a focus on the subject matter content or teaching mathematics with a focus on the whole child and whole curriculum. This book discusses the challenges before the nation's mathematical sciences community to focus its energy on the improvement of middle grades mathematics education and to begin an ongoing national dialogue on middle grades mathematics education.

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