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Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
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FIGURE 1.1 Members of the client group and their lines of communication. The members Of the client team—who are representatives of the users, the financial office, and the facilities operations group—are intimately involved in all phases of a laboratory construction or renovation project. The client group is composed of the client team and all other members of the institution who are involved in the project, such as the users, campus architect, environmental health and safety (EH&S) officer, and the external relations office. This group also includes special consultants, such as a construction manager and site assessor, who are hired by the client. Users communicate with the client team through the user representative. All other communication within the client group, including that with consultants, is through the client project manager, with the possible exception of communication between the EH&S officer and the facilities operations group. The colors assigned to the members of this group-red for members of the institution, purple for consultants-are used in the communication figures in Chapter 2

Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
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FIGURE 1.2 Members of the design group and their lines of communication. The members of the design group are the architect and other design professionals, such as laboratory programmers, engineers, and specialty consultants hired by the design firm (e.g., fire specialists, environmental consultants, and code consultants). All communication within this group is through the architect project manager. The color for this group-green-is used in the communication figures in Chapter 2

FIGURE 1.3 Members of the construction group. Members of the construction group are the general contractor and the subcontractors, and may also include suppliers. The color for this group—blue—is used in the communication figures in Chapter 2

Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
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FIGURE 2.2 Participants involved in predesign phase activities and their lines of communication. The client team is central to all communications within the client group. The users communicate with the client team through the user representative; all other client communication with the client team is through the client project manager. The external community communicates with the client team only through the external relations office. Communications between the design and client groups in this phase of the project are between the architect project manager in the design group and, depending on the issue, the user representative or the client project manager of the client team. It is essential that these primary points of contact be respected. Red = client group, green = design group, purple = external members of client group.

Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×

FIGURE 2.3 Participants involved in design phase activities and their lines of communication. The client team is central to all communications within the client group. The users communicate with the client team through the user representative; all other client communication with the client team is through the client project manager (PM). The external community communicates with the client team only through the external relations office. This phase differs from the predesign phase in that all communications between the design and client groups are between the architect project manager and the client project manager. It is essential that these primary points of contact be respected. Red client group, green = design group, purple = external members of client group.

Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×

FIGURE 2.4 Participants involved in construction phase activities and their lines of communications. The client team is central to all communications within the client group. The users communicate with the client team through the user representative; all other client communication with the client team is through the client project manager (PM). The external community communicates with the client team only through the external relations office. Communications between the client, design, and construction groups are only between the general contractor, the client project manager, and the architect project manager. Because of the large number of participants in this phase of the project, it is essential that these primary points of contact be respected. Red = client group, green = design group, purple = external members of client group, blue=construction group.

Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×

FIGURE 2.5 Participants involved in postconstruction phase activities and their lines of communications. The client team is central to all communications within the client group. The users communicate with the client team through the user representative; all other communication with the client team is through the client project manager. The external community communicates with the client team only through the external relations office. Communications between the client, design, and construction groups are conducted between the general contractor, the client project manager, and the architect project manager. Because of the large number of participants in this phase of the project, it is essential that these primary points of contact be respected. Red = client group, green = design group, purple = external members of client group, blue = construction group.

Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 157
Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 158
Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 159
Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 160
Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Color Figures." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 162
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Laboratory facilities are complex, technically sophisticated, and mechanically intensive structures that are expensive to build and to maintain. Hundreds of decisions must be made before and during new construction or renovation that will determine how successfully the facility will function when completed and how successfully it can be maintained once put into service.

This book provides guidance on effective approaches for building laboratory facilities in the chemical and biochemical sciences. It contains both basic and laboratory-specific information addressed to the user community-the scientists and administrators who contract with design and construction experts. The book will also be important to the design and construction communities-the architects, laboratory designers, and engineers who will design the facility and the construction personnel who will build it-to help them communicate with the scientific community for whom they build laboratory facilities.

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