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Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product (2000)

Chapter: Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
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Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
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APPENDIX A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

John I. Brauman, committee chair, is the J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University. Dr. Brauman's research centers on structure and reactivity of organic and organometallic compounds in solution and in the gas phase. A physical organic chemist, he received his B.S. in 1959 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. Dr. Brauman is a recipient of numerous awards including the American Chemical Society's Award in Pure Chemistry, the Harrison Howe Award, and the James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is deputy editor for physical sciences for Science magazine and has served on several National Research Council panels and committees, including the Committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants.

John L. Anderson is the dean of engineering and a professor of chemical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests are in colloid science, membrane transport and separations, fluid dynamics, and bioengineering. He received a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 1967 at the University of Delaware and a Ph.D. at the University of Illinois (Urbana). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is co-chair of the National Research Council's Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.

W. Emmett Barkley is the director of laboratory safety at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). Dr. Barkley directed the National Cancer Insti-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×

tute's office of research safety and the divisions of safety and engineering services at the National Institutes of Health before joining HHMI in 1989. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Virginia in 1961 and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental health from the University of Minnesota in 1966 and 1972, respectively. Dr. Barkley has received of numerous awards, including the Distinguished Service Medal of the U.S. Public Health Service. He served on the National Research Council's Committee on Prudent Practices for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Chemicals in the Laboratory and was the chair of the Committee on Safety and Health in Research Animal Facilities.

Janet S. Baum is an architect and the founder of Health Education + Research Associates, Inc. (HERA). Ms. Baum specializes in the programming, planning, and design of technical facilities. Her experience focuses on state-of-the-art institutional and corporate research facilities in the traditional scientific disciplines, as well as in biotechnology and materials science. Before forming HERA, Ms. Baum was director of Science and Technology Facility Design at Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum-St. Louis. During the past 32 years she has programmed and planned the renovation or construction of numerous chemistry, biochemistry, and medical facilities and has written several books on laboratory design principles. She received a B.S. from Washington University in 1966 and a master's of architecture from Harvard University in 1970.

Robert H. Becker is the research planning manager in Workplace Strategies and Operations at Monsanto Company, specializing in Agricultural Research Growth Facilities. He has worked on projects for research facilities/workplace planning for biotechnological, pharmaceutical, and agricultural facilities at Monsanto. He is a civil structural engineer with extensive experience in operating and designing, developing, and building research facilities. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Missouri in 1969 and his M.S. in engineering management from the University of Missouri at Rolla in 1971. He is a registered Professional Engineer and a certified facility manager with the International Facility Management Association.

Peter J. Bruns is a professor of genetics at Cornell University. He is a biologist who conducts research in molecular and developmental genetics. He received his A.B. from Syracuse University in 1963 and his Ph.D. in cell biology from the University of Illinois in 1969. He served as associate director of the Biotechnology Program at Cornell University, overseeing the design and construction of the biotechnology building. He has served on the editorial board of Current Genetics and of the European Journal of Protistology and as an associate editor of the Journal of Experimental Zoology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×

Carol Creutz, chair of the Department of Chemistry at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is an inorganic chemist whose research interests include electron, atom, and proton transfer reactions; photochemistry of transition metal complexes; small molecule coordination; and catalytic chemistry. She received her B.S. from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1966 and her Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University in 1970. She has served on the Inorganic Chemistry editorial board. She was a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Prudent Practices for the Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Chemicals in the Laboratory.

Daniel L. Hightower, director of Facilities Management at the University of Kansas, is an architectural engineer who has had extensive experience in laboratory design and planning. In his previous position as associate director for management controls and policy in the Division of Engineering Services at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) he helped write NIH Design Policy and Guidelines. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects' steering committees for "Guidelines for Construction and Equipment of Hospitals and Medical Facilities" and the new "Guidelines for Biomedical Research Laboratories." He received his B.S. in building design and construction from Pittsburgh State University in 1971 and his M.S. in architectural engineering from the University of Kansas in 1974.

David R. Parker is the administrator of the Hazardous Materials Division of the Santa Clara Fire Department. He consults on issues of hazardous materials storage, handling, and use; reviews building plans for facilities using hazardous materials; and inspects work done on such facilities. In addition, he has worked as a chemist in the chemical industry, at Clorox Corp. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry from the University of California at Davis in 1968 and 1976, respectively.

Frank J. Popper is a professor of urban studies at Rutgers University. He is an expert on locally unwanted land use. He has written extensively on the topic of land use, serves on the editorial boards of several land-planning journals, and consults on land use for various organizations. He received his B.A. in psychology from Haverford College in 1965 and his M.P.A. in public administration and Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University in 1968 and 1972, respectively. He has received the Rutgers University Presidential Award for Distinguished Public Service and the American Geographical Society's Paul Vouras Medal for regional geography.

Charles A. Potter is a research scientist with Hercules, Inc. He is a general analytical chemist whose current research is focused in the area of thermal analysis. He has been involved in coordinating the renovation of a large laboratory

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×

building in a research complex that contains facilities ranging from research laboratories to a pilot plant. He received a B.A. in chemistry from the University of Connecticut in 1975, a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Georgia in 1979, and an M.B.A. in 1985 from the University of Delaware.

Michael Reagan is an architect and vice president of Ellenzweig Associates, specializing in the programming, design, and construction administration of scientific research and teaching facilities. His major projects over 20 years include science research and teaching facilities for major universities, colleges, and private industry. He serves as a member of the Project Kaleidoscope steering committee for facilities. He received a bachelor of environmental design from Miami University and a masters of architecture from the University of Michigan, and he has completed advanced studies at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London.

Paul R. Resnick, retired, was a DuPont fellow employed by DuPont Fluoroproducts. He is an organic chemist whose research focused on fluorine chemistry. He has been involved both in laboratory renovations and in building a new structure for chemical research. Dr. Resnick received his B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1955 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Cornell University in 1961. He is past chair of the Fluorine Division of the American Chemical Society and has received the American Chemical Society's Award in Fluorine Chemistry.

Amos B. Smith III is the Rhodes-Thompson Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an organic chemist whose research is focused on the synthesis of complex biologically active compounds and theoretically interesting unnatural products and novel materials. He was involved in the construction of a recently completed, new laboratory research building at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his combined B.S. and M.S. from Bucknell University in 1966 and his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University in 1972. He has served on numerous national editorial and advisory boards and has been chair of the Organic Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and is currently first editor-in-chief of the new ACS publication, Organic Letters. He has won awards including the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award for Senior U.S. Scientists, the ACS Ernest Guenther Award in the Chemistry of Natural Products, and the ACS Award for Creativity in Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 127
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 128
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 129
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 130
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 131
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2000. Laboratory Design, Construction, and Renovation: Participants, Process, and Product. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9799.
×
Page 132
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Laboratory facilities are complex, technically sophisticated, and mechanically intensive structures that are expensive to build and to maintain. Hundreds of decisions must be made before and during new construction or renovation that will determine how successfully the facility will function when completed and how successfully it can be maintained once put into service.

This book provides guidance on effective approaches for building laboratory facilities in the chemical and biochemical sciences. It contains both basic and laboratory-specific information addressed to the user community-the scientists and administrators who contract with design and construction experts. The book will also be important to the design and construction communities-the architects, laboratory designers, and engineers who will design the facility and the construction personnel who will build it-to help them communicate with the scientific community for whom they build laboratory facilities.

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