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Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices (2000)

Chapter: Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
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Appendix H
Committee and Staff Biographies

BERNARD GUYER, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is chairman of the Department of Population and Family Health Sciences in the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He also holds joint appointments in Pediatrics in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and in International Health in the Vaccines Sciences Program. Dr. Guyer previously served as the director of the Division of Family Health Services for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (1979–1986) and was also a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) medical epidemiologist assigned to Cameroon, Africa (1974–1977). He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served on several IOM committees, including the IOM Committee on Injury Prevention and Control (1997–1998), the Committee on a Maternal and Child Health Perspective on Health Care Reform (1991– 1993), the Quality Initiative Coordinating Committee, and the Committee to Study Outreach for Prenatal Care (1986–1988). He is a former member of the IOM-National Research Council Board on Children, Youth, and Families (1993–1997). He is the coeditor (with H.Grason) of the text Assessing and Developing Primary Care for Children: Reforms in Health Systems (National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1995).

DAVID R.SMITH, M.D. (Vice-Chair), was appointed President of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in 1996, following a 5-year term as Commissioner of the Texas Department of Health. He previously served as senior vice president of Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas and chief executive officer and medical director of Parkland’s Commu

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×

nity Oriented Primary Care Program. He has been a member of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Vaccine Advisory Committee and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Good Neighbor Environmental Board. Dr. Smith also serves in a national leadership conference organized by the Surgeon General to find solutions that will eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in six health areas by the year 2010. He is a pediatrician, former president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers, and a past member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee. Dr. Smith has been a member of two previous IOM committees: the Committee on the Health and Adjustment of Immigrant Children and Families (1996–1998) and the Committee to Study Outreach for Prenatal Care (1984–1986).

E.RUSSELL ALEXANDER, M.D., is a pediatrician who recently retired as Chief of Epidemiology with the Seattle-King County Health Department (1990–1998). He previously served in CDC’s Division of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1983–1989) and was an epidemic intelligence service officer for CDC in 1955–1957 and 1959–1960. Dr. Alexander is also professor emeritus, having served as professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology and International Health for the University of Washington School of Public Health (1969–1979 and 1990–1998). He was professor of pediatrics at the University of Arizona 1979–1983. He serves on the IOM Vaccine Safety Forum (1994-present) and was a member of the IOM Vaccine Safety Committee (1992–1994) and the IOM Committee on Human Health Hazards of Antibiotics in Animal Feed (1979–1980).

GORDON BERLIN, M.A., has worked since 1990 with the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (a social policy research and demonstration intermediary that develops and manages large-scale, multisite demonstration projects designed to test new social policies in the areas of work, training, income support, and social services for at-risk populations). He also was the founding executive director of the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation, a sister organization operating in Canada. In addition to his responsibility for corporate strategic planning and project management, Mr. Berlin oversees all of the corporation’s evaluation and demonstration projects concerned with state welfare-to-work programs and work incentive projects for the working poor. Previously he was the executive deputy administrator for management, budget, and policy for the New York City Human Resources Administration. Mr. Berlin has also served as program officer and deputy director of the Urban Poverty Program of the Ford Foundation. He was previously a member of the NRC Panel on High-Risk Youth (1992–1993).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×

STEVE BLACK, M.D., is codirector of the Kaiser Pediatric Vaccine Study Center in Oakland, California. The Center was established in 1984 for the prelicensure and postlicensure evaluation of adult and pediatric vaccine safety, immunogenicity, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness. Dr. Black is also a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland. In addition, he is an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Black is a member of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society, the European Society for Pediatric Infectious Disease, and the Society for Pediatric Research. He is a fellow of the Infectious Disease Society of America and a member of the European Society for Pediatric Research. Dr. Black received a B.S. degree in biochemistry and molecular biology and a B.A. degree in chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara, as well as a medical degree from the University of California, San Diego. He completed a fellowship in pediatric infectious disease at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Black has authored or coauthored more than 30 articles on vaccine issues, including pre- and post-licensure evaluations of combination vaccines.

SHEILA BURKE, M.P.A, R.N., F.A.A.N., is the executive dean and a lecturer in public policy at the John F.Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. She served as the chief of staff to former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (1986–1996), and was also elected to serve as Secretary of the Senate in 1995. Ms. Burke served as deputy chief of staff to the Senate Majority Leader (1985–1986), and was a professional staff member of the Senate Finance Committee (1979–1980) and deputy staff director of the Senate Finance Committee (1981–1985). She is a member of the board of the Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc. in Princeton, NJ; the Kaiser Commission on the Future of Medicaid; and the national advisory committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Covering Kids initiative. Ms. Burke is a member of the IOM-NRC Board on Children, Youth, and Families (1998-present). She is also a member of the Boards of Trustees of Marymount University and the University of San Francisco.

BARBARA DeBUONO, M.D., M.P.H., is a public health consultant in New York City. She served as commissioner of health for New York State (1995–1998) and was subsequently appointed as chief executive of the New York Presbyterian Healthcare Network and executive vice president of the New York Presbyterian Healthcare System until December 1999. Prior to joining the New York State Department of Health, Dr. DeBuono was director of health for the State of Rhode Island (1991–1995), also serving as a medical and state epidemiologist and medical director in that state (1986–1991). She has previously served on the medical and public

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×

health school faculties of Brown University Medical School and the State University of New York in Albany. In her role as Commissioner of Health, Dr. DeBuono shaped New York State’s comprehensive Medicaid Managed Care program, with particular emphasis on quality improvement in managed care and primary care access.

GORDON H.DeFRIESE, Ph.D., is professor of social medicine, epidemiology, and health policy and administration at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For the past 25 years, he has also held an appointment as Director of the Cecil G.Sheps Center for Health Services Research at the university. He is a member of the Global Advisory Group on Health Systems Research of the World Health Organization in Geneva, past president of the Association for Health Services Research and the Foundation for Health Services Research, and a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine. Since 1994 he has served as president and CEO of the North Carolina Institute of Medicine. Dr. DeFriese is a past president and distinguished fellow of the Association for Health Services Research. He was also the editor (1983–1996, now editor emeritus) of the journal Health Services Research. He is a founder of the Partnership for Prevention, a coalition of private-sector business and industry organizations, voluntary health organizations, and state and federal public health agencies based in Washington, D.C., that have joined together to work toward the elevation of disease prevention among the nation’s health policy priorities. Dr. DeFriese is a member of IOM and has served on the IOM Committee on Maintaining Privacy and Security in Healthcare Applications of the National Information Infrastructure (1995–1997) and the Forum on Emerging Infections (1996–1999).

R.GORDON DOUGLAS, Jr., M.D., is former president, Merck Vaccine Division, Merck Co. Inc. (from which he retired in May 1999). In that position, he was responsible primarily for the research, development, and manufacturing and marketing of Merck’s vaccine products. Prior to joining Merck in 1989, Dr. Douglas had a distinguished career as a physician and academician, specializing in infectious diseases. From 1982 to 1990, he was professor of medicine and chairman, Department of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College and physician-in-chief, The New York Hospital. He also served as head of the Infectious Disease Unit at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Dr. Douglas is a graduate of Princeton University and Cornell University Medical College. He received his medical staff training at The New York Hospital and Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is a member of IOM, the Association of American Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and numerous other organizations, and has served on the National Vaccine Advisory Committee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×

WALTER FAGGETT, M.D., is a pediatric consultant in the Washington, D.C., area and chairs the pediatric section of the National Medical Association. He also serves as NMA’s liaison to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. He has extensive experience in working with managed care organizations that serve disadvantaged families. He recently served as medical director for Grady Health Care, Inc. in Atlanta; medical director for Omnicare HMO in Memphis, Tennessee; and assistant medical director and pediatrician for Medlink Hospital’s Primary Care Center in Washington, D.C. He is a retired United States Army colonel, having served 21 years.

SAMUEL L.KATZ, M.D., is chairman of the Board of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and Wilburt C.Davison Professor and chairman emeritus of pediatrics at Duke University Medical Center. For 22 years (ending in 1990), Dr. Katz was chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Duke University School of Medicine. His career has been devoted to infectious disease research, focusing principally on vaccine research and development. Dr. Katz’s research included an extensive collaborative effort with Nobel Laureate John F.Enders, during which they developed the attenuated measles virus vaccine now used throughout the world. Dr. Katz has chaired the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics (the Redbook Committee), CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, and several World Health Organization and Children’s Vaccine Initiative panels on vaccines and human immunodeficiency virus infections. He has been president of the American Pediatric Society and of the Association of Medical School Pediatric Department Chairmen. He is coeditor (with A.Gershon and P.Hotez) of a textbook (now in its 10th edition) on infectious diseases. Dr. Katz is a member of IOM and serves on the IOM Committee on Establishing Vaccine Development Priorities for the United States (1995–1999). He has been a member of many other IOM committees, including the Forum on Emerging Infections (1996–1999), the Committee on Child Health in the Former Yugoslavia (1995), the Committee for the Children’s Vaccine Initiative—Continuing Activities (1995), the Committee for a Study of Public/Private Sector Relations in Vaccine Innovation (1985), and the Committee on Issues and Priorities for New Vaccine Development (1982–1986). Currently he co-chairs, with Dr. Louis Sullivan, the Vaccine Initiative of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

SARA ROSENBAUM, J.D., is director of the Center for Health Services Research and Policy and professor in the Department of Health Services Management and Policy in the School of Public Health and Health Services at The George Washington University. She also holds appointments

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×

in the Schools of Law and Medicine and Health Sciences. Ms. Rosenbaum has worked extensively in the areas of health law for the poor, health care financing and managed care, and maternal and child health. During 1993 and 1994, she worked with the White House Domestic Policy Council and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, directing the legislative drafting of the Health Security Act for the President. She has served on policy advisory boards for the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, the U.S. Public Health Service, and the Health Care Financing Administration. She also holds positions on technical and expert advisory boards including the Committee on Performance Measures of the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA), and since 1992 has served as the public member of the American Board of Pediatrics. She has coauthored (with R.Rosenblatt and S.Law) Law and the American Health Care System. Prior to joining the Center, Ms. Rosenbaum was on the staff of the Children’s Defense Fund, where she served as director of both the Health Division and the Department of Programs and Policy.

CATHY SCHOEN, M.A., joined The Commonwealth Fund in September 1995 as director of research and evaluation. Prior to joining the Fund, she was director of special projects at the University of Massachusetts Labor Relations and Research Center. She also serves as program director of the Fund’s Health Care Coverage and Quality Program, a policy and research grant program established to help inform national and state health insurance and delivery system policy decisions. During the 1980s, Ms. Schoen directed the Service Employees International Union’s Research and Policy Department in Washington, D.C. She went to SEIU after serving as a member of President Carter’s national health insurance task force, where she was responsible for national reform issues and research and policy related to Medicaid and ambulatory care payment policies. She also served as a senior health advisor during the 1988 presidential campaign. Prior to her federal government service, she was a research associate at the Brookings Institution. She is the author and coauthor of many publications on health care coverage and quality issues.

JANE E.SISK, Ph.D., is professor of health policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York. Her current research is focusing on the cost-effectiveness of health care interventions, including pneumococcal vaccination for elderly people, implementation of evidence-based guidelines, and evaluation of Medicaid managed care. Before coming to Mount Sinai in 1999, Dr. Sisk was professor of public health, Columbia University School of Public Health, where she developed and directed the Master’s Program in Effectiveness and Outcome Research. She previously directed health policy projects at the Congressional Office of Technology Assess-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×

ment, where she was a senior associate and project director in the Health Program. Her reports addressed such topics as information for consumers on the quality of medical care, Medicare payment for physician services, and the cost-effectiveness of preventive services. Dr. Sisk is currently a member of the IOM/NRC National Cancer Policy Board (2000). She has previously served on IOM’s Committee on Evaluating Telemedicine: Clinical, Economic, and Policy Issues (1995–1996); the Committee on the Children’s Vaccine Initiative (1992–1993); the Committee to Advise the National Library of Medicine on Information Center Services (1990–1991); the Committee on Public/Private Sector Relations in Vaccine Innovation (1985); and the Committee on Issues and Priorities for New Vaccine Development (1982–1986). Dr. Sisk received a Ph.D. in economics from McGill University and a B.A. with honors in international relations from Brown University, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude. She is an elected fellow in the Association for Health Service Research.

BARBARA WOLFE, Ph.D., is director of the Institute for Research on Poverty and professor of economics, public affairs, and preventive medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison. She teaches courses in health economics and public economics, and is the coauthor of Succeeding Generations: On the Effects of Investments in Children. She has been a Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, a Research Associate for the National Bureau of Economics Research, a member of IOM’s Board on International Health, and a scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. Dr. Wolfe received a Ph.D. and M.A. in economics at the University of Pennsylvania, and a B.A. in economics at Cornell University.

STAFF

ROSEMARY CHALK is study director for the IOM Committee on Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. She has served as a study director or senior program officer for several projects within both IOM and NRC since 1986, including studies on family violence, child abuse and neglect, research ethics, and education finance. Prior to that time she was a consultant for science and society research projects in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She was program head of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1976–1986. Ms. Chalk has a B.A. in foreign affairs from the University of Cincinnati.

TRACY McKAY is a senior program assistant in the IOM Division of Health Care Services. She has worked on several projects, including the National Roundtable on Health Care Quality; Children, Health Insurance

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×

and Access to Care; Quality of Health Care in America; and a study on non-heart-beating organ donors. She is currently providing assistance for the National Quality Report on Health Care Delivery and a new project on the health consequences of being uninsured in America. Ms. McKay received her B.A. in sociology from Vassar College in May 1996.

SUZANNE MILLER is a senior program assistant in the IOM Division of Health Care Services. She graduated with a B.A. in history and biology from Harvard College in 1999 and will begin studies at the Harvard Medical School in fall 2000.

WILHELMINE MILLER, M.S., Ph.D., is a senior program officer in the Division of Health Care Services. Prior to joining IOM, Dr. Miller was an adjunct professor of philosophy at Georgetown University and Trinity College, teaching political philosophy, ethics, and public policy. She received her doctorate in philosophy from Georgetown, with studies and research in bioethics and issues of social justice. In 1994–1995, Dr. Miller was a consultant to the President’s Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, evaluating the implementation of current protections for federal human research subjects by federal agencies. Dr. Miller was a program analyst in the Department of Health and Human Services for 14 years, responsible for policy development and regulatory review in areas including hospital and HMO payment, prescription drug benefits, and child health. Her M.S. from Harvard University is in health policy and management.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix H: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Calling the Shots: Immunization Finance Policies and Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9836.
×
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Calling the Shots examines the basic strategies that finance the national immunization system in the current health care climate. It is a comprehensive volume, rich with data and highlighted examples, that explores:

  • The evolution of the system in light of changing U.S. demographics, development of new vaccines, and other factors.
  • The effectiveness of public health and health insurance strategies, with special emphasis on the performance of the "Section 317" program .
  • The condition of the infrastructure for control and prevention of infectious disease, surveillance of vaccines rates and safety, and efforts to sustain high coverage.

Calling the Shots will be an indispensable resource to those responsible for maintaining our nation's vaccine vigilance.

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