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Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States (2000)

Chapter: Appendix G Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
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APPENDIX G

Committee Biographies

MORTON SWARTZ, M.D. (Chair), Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. Morton Swartz received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. He is professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, chief of the James Jackson Firm of the Medical Service, and chief, emeritus, of the Infectious Disease Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, an associate editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, and a master of the American College of Physicians and recipient of its Distinguished Teacher Award. He has served as president of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and has been a recipient of its Bristol Award, as chairman of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and on the Board of Governors of the American Board of Internal Medicine. His publications cover a variety of clinical and research subjects in the fields of infectious disease and antimicrobial resistance.

RONALD BAYER, Ph.D., Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Ronald Bayer is professor in the Division of Sociomedical Sciences at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago. Since 1982, he has been involved in the study of the ethical and policy dimensions of the AIDS epidemic. He served on the National Research Council's committee to study the social impact of AIDS. He is the author of numerous articles on ethical issues posed by AIDS and tuberculosis and of Private Acts, Social Consequences: AIDS and the Politics

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
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of Public Health, and has edited most recently Blood Feuds: AIDS, Blood, and the Politics of Medical Disaster.

C. PATRICK CHAULK, M.D., M.P.H., Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland. Patrick Chaulk received his M.D. and completed a residency in pediatrics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He also completed a residency and chief residency in preventive medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. As the senior associate for health at the Annie Casey Foundation, Dr. Chaulk directs the foundation's investments in health and public health. He also serves as an adjunct faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and the School of Medicine, where he serves as pediatric consultant to Baltimore City's tuberculosis (TB) and sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics. He has extensive experience in congressional, state, and municipal health and public health public policy regarding TB and STD control. He has written on TB and STD policy and care, public health, and managed care. The recipient of an American Medical Association/ Burroughs-Wellcome Resident Leadership Award, he also was selected as a U.S. Public Health Service Primary Care Health Policy Fellow.

FRAN DU MELLE, M.S., American Lung Association, Washington, D.C. Fran Du Melle is deputy managing director of the American Lung Association. She serves as the director of government relations for the American Lung Association and the American Thoracic Society. She has primary responsibility for the development and implementation of the public policy program, including policy initiatives in environmental health, health care and public health, research advocacy, and tobacco control. Ms. Du Melle's specific areas of expertise include air quality and the public health policy aspects of tuberculosis control and asthma prevention and control.

SUE C. ETKIND, R.N., M.S., Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston. Sue Etkind received her diploma in nursing from Concord Hospital School of Nursing and her nursing degree from Fitchburg State College. She graduated from Russell Sage College with a master's degree in health education. She has been the director of the Division of Tuberculosis Prevention and Control since 1984. Ms. Etkind has served on the National Advisory Committee for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, and has been a consultant for the former congressional Office of Technology Assessment, the Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment, and the American Lung Association. She has held positions in the Nursing Section of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Other Lung Diseases and in its North American region and is the current vice-president of the National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
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TB Controllers Association. Ms. Etkind was also a recipient of the Lillian Wald Public Service Award presented by the American Public Health Association. She has written extensively on the public health aspects of tuberculosis control.

DAVID FLEMING, M.D., Oregon Health Division, Portland. David Fleming is Oregon's state epidemiologist and oversees Health Division programs in communicable disease prevention; HIV and sexually transmitted diseases; health promotion and chronic disease prevention; environmental, occupational, and injury epidemiology; and vital records and community assessment. He received his M.D. at the State University of New York, his training in internal medicine at Oregon Health Sciences University, and his training in preventive medicine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is on the faculty in the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Oregon Health Sciences University and has authored or coauthored a number of scientific publications. He sits on several national advisory boards and task forces, including the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the U.S. Public Health Service Task Force on Community Preventive Services. He is a past president of CSTE, the national association of state epidemiologists.

AUDREY R. GOTSCH, Dr.P.H., C.H.E.S., University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-School of Public Health. Audrey Gotsch graduated from the University of Michigan School of Public Health (M.P.H.) and the Columbia University School of Public Health (Dr.P.H.). She is professor and interim dean at the UMDNJ School of Public Health. She also serves as director of the Division of Public Education and Risk Communication, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Her expertise is in public health, with a specialty in environmental and occupational health education. Dr. Gotsch has been involved in the design, implementation, evaluation, and replication of an environmental and occupational health information program that includes an environmental health sciences curriculum to provide critical thinking skills for youths from kindergarten through 12th grade. She also directs a regional training program that has enhanced the skills of over 180,000 workers in environmental and occupational health content areas. She is the immediate past president of the American Public Health Association, former president of the Council on Education for Public Health, former chair and current member of the New Jersey Public Health Council, and chair of the Board of Directors of the National Center for Health Education.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
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PHILIP C. HOPEWELL, M.D., San Francisco General Hospital, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Hopewell obtained his M.D. degree from West Virginia University and trained in internal medicine and pulmonary disease at UCSF. Currently, he is professor of medicine at UCSF and associate dean of the School of Medicine. Dr. Hopewell's interest in tuberculosis stems from his time as a medical officer in the U.S. Public Health Service Division of Tuberculosis Control, from which he was assigned to the Pennsylvania Department of Health for 2 years. He has also worked in tuberculosis control programs in Nigeria and Peru. Dr. Hopewell is past president of the American Thoracic Society and the North American region of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. He was also director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National Tuberculosis Program. Currently, he is medical director of the Francis J. Curry National Tuberculosis Center at UCSF and coordinator of the Tuberculosis Global Action Plan development process, working in collaboration with the World Health Organization. He conducts an active research program in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis as well as in other clinical and epidemiological investigative areas.

DONALD R. HOPKINS, M.D., M.P.H., The Carter Center, Chicago. Donald Hopkins is associate executive director of The Carter Center, where he oversees all health programs. He was with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 20 years, the last 3 as deputy director, before moving to The Carter Center in 1987. He is especially interested in disease eradication, having served in the Smallpox Eradication Program. He cochaired the Dahlem Workshop on the Eradication of Infectious Diseases in 1997 and is currently leading the Dracunculiasis (Guinea worm disease) Eradication Program from The Carter Center. He has served on two previous Institute of Medicine committees.

JOHN A. SBARBARO, M.D., M.P.H., University of Colorado Health Sciences Denver, Denver. John Sbarbaro serves as the medical director of University Physicians, Inc., the multispecialty medical group practice of the University of Colorado School of Medicine. A graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Harvard School of Public Health, he has held professorships in both medicine and preventive medicine since 1983. He has been involved in all aspects of tuberculosis control since 1965 and has been a member of 35 national and international committees or panels and has served as a consultant to the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Labor. He has authored 12 book chapters and more than 145

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
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journal publications. He has also served in a variety of leadership roles in the private, public, insurance, and voluntary sectors of medicine.

PETER M. SMALL, M.D., Stanford University Medical Center. Peter Small was trained in internal medicine at the University of California at San Francisco and infectious diseases at Stanford Medical Center. The focus of his research is the nature and consequence of genetic variability within the species Mycobacterium tuberculosis. He has published extensively on the use of molecular genotyping in tuberculosis research, particularly as it relates to the evaluation and improvement of tuberculosis control. He has participated actively in research projects in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe. He is currently the director of the Stanford Center for Tuberculosis Research.

MARY E. WILSON, M.D., Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Mass. Mary E. Wilson graduated from the University of Wisconsin Medical School and is chief of infectious diseases at Mount Auburn Hospital. At Harvard Medical School, she is associate professor of medicine; at Harvard School of Public Health she is associate professor of population and international health. She served on the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1988 to 1992 and on the Academic Advisory Committee for the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico. She wrote A World Guide to Infections: Diseases, Distribution, Diagnosis (Oxford University Press, 1991) and edited, with R. Levins and A. Spielman, Disease in Evolution: Global Changes and Emergence of Infectious Diseases (New York Academy of Sciences, 1994). Her interests include determinants of infectious disease distribution, infections in travelers and immigrants, tuberculosis, and immunizations.

LESTER N. WRIGHT, M.D., M.P.H., New York State Department of Correctional Services, Albany. Lester N. Wright is associate commissioner and chief medical officer responsible for provision of health care to 72,000 inmates in New York State prisons. He is certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. He has served as county and state health director (commissioner). He spent 7 years working in various parts of Africa in the delivery of primary health care and health system development and supervision. He continues to do international consultation in areas such as child survival and HIV prevention. He has dealt with tuberculosis in primary care in Ethiopia, and has been a TB control officer for a county public health agency and a state health officer. During his term at the Department of Correctional Services, multiple drug-resistant TB was first

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
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Page 255

identified among prisoners and new cases of TB have decreased 83 percent since their peak in 1991. Liaison from the Board on International Health

BARRY R. BLOOM, Ph.D., dean of the Harvard School of Public Health and professor of immunology and infectious disease. Barry R. Bloom received his B.A. and an honorary Sc.D. from Amherst College and his Ph.D. from the Rockefeller University. Dr. Bloom is an immunologist and microbiologist engaged in research on infectious diseases and vaccines. Before going to Harvard, Dr. Bloom was an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Weinstock Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the National Center for Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He chairs the Board of Trustees of the newly established International Vaccine Institute and is cochair of the Board on Global Health of the Institute of Medicine. He is chairman of the Vaccine Advisory Committee of UNAIDS and a member of the U.S. AIDS Vaccine Research Committee. In 1991, he received the first Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Research in Infectious Diseases and in 1998 received the Novartis Prize in Immunology. Dr. Bloom is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine. Liaison to the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

ROBERT FULLILOVE, Ed.D., Columbia University School of Public Health. Robert Fullilove received his Ed.D. from Columbia University. He is currently the associate dean for community and minority affairs at Columbia University's School of Public Health. He is also an associate professor of clinical public health and the codirector of the Community Research Group at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. His research includes HIV disease among people of color, crack cocaine use and sexually transmitted disease in the AIDS era, and trauma-related disorders and their impact on sexual risk taking. He is a member of the Board of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine and has served as a member/nominee to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×

Page 256

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×
Page 250
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×
Page 251
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×
Page 252
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×
Page 253
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×
Page 254
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×
Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Appendix G Committee Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9837.
×
Page 256
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Ending Neglect: The Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States Get This Book
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Tuberculosis emerged as an epidemic in the 1600s, began to decline as sanitation improved in the 19th century, and retreated further when effective therapy was developed in the 1950s. TB was virtually forgotten until a recent resurgence in the U.S. and around the world-ominously, in forms resistant to commonly used medicines.

What must the nation do to eliminate TB? The distinguished committee from the Institute of Medicine offers recommendations in the key areas of epidemiology and prevention, diagnosis and treatment, funding and organization of public initiatives, and the U.S. role worldwide. The panel also focuses on how to mobilize policy makers and the public to effective action.

The book provides important background on the pathology of tuberculosis, its history and status in the U.S., and the public and private response.

The committee explains how the U.S. can act with both self-interest and humanitarianism in addressing the worldwide incidence of TB.

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