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How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition (2000)

Chapter: Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
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Biographical Sketches of Committees’ Members and Staff

COMMITTEE ON DEVELOPMENTS IN THE SCIENCE OF LEARNING

JOHN D.BRANSFORD (Cochair) is Centennial professor of psychology and codirector of the Learning Technology Center at George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. He is also a senior research scientist at the University’s John F.Kennedy Center and senior fellow at the Institute of Public Policy Studies. His research has focused primarily on the nature of thinking and learning and their facilitation, with special emphasis on the importance of using technology to enhance learning. His projects have included the videodisc-based Jasper Woodbury Jasper Problem Solving Series, the Little Planet Literacy Series, and other projects that involve uses of technology to enhance thinking and learning in literature, science, history, and other areas. Bransford serves on the editorial board of several journals and has written numerous books and articles in the fields of psychology and education. He is a member of the National Academy of Education. He received a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Minnesota.

ANN L.BROWN (Cochair) was the Evelyn Lois Corey Chair at the University of California, Berkeley. She had long-term interests in learning and understanding in children at risk for academic failure and is presently focusing her research on students as researchers and teachers within a wider community of learners. She received many honors and awards in both the United States and England for distinguished contributions to educational research, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Spencer Senior Fellowship, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Educational Research Association, the 1995 American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for the Applications of Psychology, and the 1997 American Psychological Society James McKeen Catell Fellow Award for Distinguished Service to

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

Applied Psychology. She was a member of the National Academy of Education and has served as president of the American Educational Research Association. She has been published widely on such topics as memory strategies, reading comprehension, analogical thinking, and metacognition. She received both her B.A. and Ph.D. in psychology at the University of London, England.

JOHN R.ANDERSON is a professor of psychology and computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. His current research involves the acquisition of cognitive skills and the understanding of how human cognition is adapted to the information processing demands of the environment. He has developed the ACT-R production system and applied it to various domains of memory, problem solving, and visual information processing. He has published widely on human associative memory, language, memory, cognition, and the adaptive character of thought. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

RODNEY R.COCKING is a senior program officer at the National Research Council and director of the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. He was previously a social science analyst in the Office of Special Populations at the National Institute of Mental Health. His research focuses on cognition and cross-cultural issues in memory and learning and the higher order cognitive processes of planful behavior. He is cofounder and coeditor, with Irving E.Sigel, of the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology. Cocking is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (developmental psychology). He received a Ph.D. in developmental psychology and cognition from Cornell University.

ROCHEL GELMAN is a professor of psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and associate dean in the University of Pennsylvania graduate office of the faculty of arts and sciences. She serves on the editorial boards of several journals and has published widely on learning, from theory to classroom applications. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow, an American Psychological Association (APA) William James Fellow, and a recipient of the APA award for distinguished scientific contribution. She has also served on the National Research Council’s U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Psychological Science, Committee on Basic Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences, and Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. She received a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

HERBERT P.GINSBURG is the Jacob H.Schiff foundation professor of psychology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. His work focuses on the intellectual development and education of young children, particularly poor and minority children. He has conducted research on the development of mathematical thinking and cognition in children, examining the implications for instruction and assessment in early education. His many publications include The Development of Mathematical Thinking (1983), Piaget’s Theory of Intellectual Development (1988), Children’s Arithmetic (1989), Entering the Child’s Mind: The Clinical Interview in Psychological Research and Practice (1997), and The Teacher’s Guide to Flexible Interviewing in the Classroom (1998). Dr. Ginsburg currently serves on the National Research Council’s Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy and on the Committee on Strategic Education Research Program Feasibility Study. He has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and has taught at Cornell University, the University of Maryland, and the University of Rochester.

ROBERT GLASER is a Distinguished University professor and the founder of the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a member of the James S.McDonnell Foundation’s Advisory Panel of Cognitive Studies for Educational Practice and is currently serving as a cochair of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Foundations of Assessment. Other National Research Council service includes: Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment and the Committee on Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education. He is also the editor of the series Advances in Instructional Psychology. He received his Ph.D. in psychological measurement and learning theory from Indiana University.

WILLIAM T.GREENOUGH is Swanlund and Center for Advanced Study professor of psychology, psychiatry, and cell and structural biology in the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is currently director of the University’s interdisciplinary neuroscience Ph.D. program. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

GLORIA LADSON-BILLINGS is a professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a senior fellow for urban education at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. Her research interests concern the relationship between culture and schooling, particularly successful teaching and learning for African American students. Her publications include both books and numerous journal articles and book chapters. She is currently the editor of the Teaching, Learning, and Human Development section of the American Educational

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

Research Journal She received a Ph.D. in curriculum and teacher education from Stanford University.

BARBARA M.MEANS is vice president of the Policy Division of SRI International. Her research activities at SRI have focused on the impact of technology on classroom teaching and learning. She directs the evaluation research component of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program and Silicon Valley Challenge 2000, a public-private partnership to reform schools and promote student learning through active use of multimedia technology. She is also coprincipal investigator of the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Innovative Learning Technologies. Her earlier work included the National Study of Technology and Education Reform. Means has been a visiting researcher at the Rockefeller University Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition. She received a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of California, Berkeley.

JOSÉ P.MESTRE is a professor of physics and astronmy in the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His research interests include cognitive studies of problem solving in physics with a focus on the acquisition and use of knowledge by experts and novices. Most recently, his work has focused on applying research findings to the design of instructional strategies that promote active learning in large physics classes and on developing physics curricula that promote conceptual development through problem solving. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Mathematical Sciences Education Board; the College Board’s Sciences Advisory Committee, SAT Committee, and Council on Academic Affairs; the Educational Testing Service’s Visiting Committee; the American Association of Physics Teacher’s Research in Physics Education Committee and of the editorial board of The Physics Teacher, and the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology’s Expert Panel. He earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

LINDA NATHAN is the headmaster of newly formed Boston Public School-Boston Arts Academy for the Visual and Performing Arts. Formerly, she served as a codirector and teacher at the Fenway Middle College High School in Boston, Massachusetts, a school recognized for its innovative curriculum that stresses academic preparation and its nationally recognized school-to-career program. She began teaching in Boston as a bilingual mathematics and theater teacher and helped found Boston’s first performing arts school. She also cofounded the Center for Collaborative Education and is a senior associate of that organization. Her research interests include new conceptions of curriculum assessment. She received an M.A. in theater arts from Emerson College and an Ed.D. in education from Harvard University.

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

ROY D.PEA is director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, in Menlo Park, California, and consulting professor in the School of Education at Stanford University. He also directs the multi-institutional Center for Innovative Learning Technologies, which aims to create a national knowledge network for catalyzing best practices and new designs for improving learning with technologies among researchers, schools, and industries.. Previously, he was a John Evans professor of education and the learning sciences at Northwestern University, where he founded and chaired the learning sciences Ph.D. program and served as dean of the School of Education and Social Policy. He works as a cognitive scientist to integrate theory, research, and the design of effective learning environments using advanced technologies, with particular focus on science, mathematics, and technology. He has been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and is a fellow of the American Psychological Society. He received his doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Oxford, England, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

PENELOPE L.PETERSON is John Evans professor of education and dean of the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. Previously, she served as University Distinguished professor of education at Michigan State University and Sears-Bascom professor of education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is a past president of the American Educational Research Association. Her recent books focus on classroom structure and school organization. She received a Ph.D. degree in psychological studies in education from Stanford University.

BARBARA ROGOFF is currently UCSC Foundation professor of psychology and professor of education at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has been a professor at the University of Utah, Osher Fellow of the Exploratorium in San Francisco, a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, a Kellogg Fellow, and a Spencer Fellow. She is editor of Human Development and received the Scribner Award from the American Educational Research Association for her book Apprenticeship in Thinking (1990, Oxford). She is a fellow of the American Psychological Society, the American Anthropological Association, and the American Psychological Association. She received a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Harvard University.

THOMAS A.ROMBERG is the Sears Roebuck Foundation-Bascom professor of education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and he directs the National Center for Improving Student Learning and Achievement in Mathematics and Science for the U.S. Department of Education. He is an editorial reviewer for many education and cognition journals and has written exten-

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

sively on cognitive aspects of learning, assessment, and evaluation. His National Research Council service has included membership in the Mathematical Sciences Education Board and the steering committee for the National Summit on Mathematics Assessment. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics education from Stanford University.

SAMUEL S.WINEBURG is an associate professor of educational psychology and adjunct associate professor of history at the University of Washington. He has been a Spencer Foundation Predoctoral Fellow and a National Academy of Education Spencer Fellow. His publications cover the psychology of learning and teaching history, contextualized thinking in history, historical problem solving, and models of wisdom in the teaching of history. His most recent research is on the nature of expertise in historical interpretation. He received a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University.

COMMITTEE ON LEARNING RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

JOHN D.BRANSFORD (Cochair) is Centennial professor of psychology and codirector of the Learning Technology Center at George Peabody College, Vanderbilt University. He is also a senior research scientist at the University’s John F.Kennedy Center and senior fellow at the Institute of Public Policy Studies. His research has focused primarily on the nature of thinking and learning and their facilitation, with special emphasis on the importance of using technology to enhance learning. His projects have included the videodisc-based Jasper Woodbury Jasper Problem Solving Series, the Little Planet Literacy Series, and other projects that involve uses of technology to enhance thinking and learning in literature, science, history, and other areas. Bransford serves on the editorial board of several journals and has written numerous books and articles in the fields of psychology and education. He is a member of the National Academy of Education. He received a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Minnesota.

JAMES W.PELLEGRINO (Cocbair) is the Frank W.Mayborn professor of cognitive studies at the Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on the application of cognitive research and technology to instructional problems on human cognition and cognitive development. Dr. Pellegrino currently serves on the National Research Council’s Committee on Foundations of Educational and Psychological Assessment. He has been a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh and at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has a B.A. in psychology from Colgate University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

from the University of Colorado, both in experimental, quantitative psychology.

DAVID BERLINER is professor of educational leadership and policy studies, professor of curriculum and instruction, and professor of psychology in education at Arizona State University. His recent research has focused on the study of teaching, teacher education, and education policy. His publications include Putting Research to Work in Your Schools (1993, with U.Casanova) and A Future for Teacher Education (1996). Dr. Berliner currently serves on the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment. Among his many awards are the research into practice award of the American Educational Research Association, and the Distinguished Service Award of the National Association of Secondary School Principals. He has served as president of the American Psychology Association’s division of educational psychology and the American Educational Research Association. He has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University and has taught at California State University at San Jose, the University of Massachusetts, and the University of Arizona.

MYRNA S.COONEY is a teacher with over 35 years of classroom experience. She currently teaches grades 6 and 7 at the Taft Middle School in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and serves on curriculum committees for language arts and social studies. She has previously taught grades 4, 5, and 6 at Cleveland Elementary School in Cedar Rapids. Ms. Cooney has a B.A. in education from Coe College and an M.A. in education from the University of Iowa. She has been an instructor in a teacher-in-service program at the University of Iowa and a teacher-in-residence at Vanderbilt University.

M.SUZANNE DONOVAN (Study Director) is a senior program officer at the National Research Council’s Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and study director for the Committee on Minority Representation in Special Education. Her interests span issues of education and public policy. She has a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Policy and was previously on the faculty of Columbia University’s School of Public and International Affairs.

ARTHUR EISENKRAFT is the science coordinatory (grades 6–12) and physics teacher in the Bedford Public Schools in Bedford, New York. He has taught high school physics in a variety of schools for 24 years. Dr. Eisenkraft is currently on the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium Science Standards Drafting Committee, and on the National Research Council’s Advisory Panel to the Center for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Education. He is the editor and project manager of the National

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

Science Foundation-supported Active Physics Curriculum Project of the American Institute of Physics and the American Association of Physics Teachers. His many publications include a lab text on laser applications, an audiotape history of the discovery of nuclear fission, middle school and high school curriculum materials, and numerous audiovisual productions. He holds a U.S. patent for a laser vision testing system. Dr. Eisenkraft serves on several science award committees and has served as executive director for the International Physics Olympiad. He has a Ph.D. in science education from New York University and received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching in 1986.

HERBERT P.GINSBURG is the Jacob H.Schiff foundation professor of psychology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. His work focuses on the intellectual development and education of young children, particularly poor and minority children. He has conducted research on the development of mathematical thinking and cognition in children, examining the implications for instruction and assessment in early education. His many publications include The Development of Mathematical Thinking (1983), Piaget’s Theory of Intellectual Development (1988), Children’s Arithmetic (1989), Entering the Child’s Mind: The Clinical Interview in Psychological Research and Practice (1997), and The Teacher’s Guide to Flexible Interviewing in the Classroom (1998). Dr. Ginsburg currently serves on the National Research Council’s Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy and on the Committee on Strategic Education Research Program Feasibility Study. He has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and has taught at Cornell University, the University of Maryland, and the University of Rochester.

PAUL D.GOREN is the director of Child and Youth Development, Program on Human and Community Development, at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Previously, he was the executive director of policy and strategic services for the Minneapolis Public Schools and spent two years teaching middle school history and mathematics. He also worked as the director of the Education Policy Studies Division of the National Governors’ Association, and as the coordinator of planning and research for the Stanford Teacher Education Program. He has a Ph.D. from the Stanford University School of Education (1991) and an M.P.A. from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas (1984).

JOSÉ P.MESTRE is a professor of physics and astronmy in the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His research interests include cognitive studies of problem solving in physics with a focus on the acquisition and use of knowledge by experts and novices. Most recently, his work has focused on applying research findings to the design of instructional strategies that promote

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×

active learning in large physics classes and on developing physics curricula that promote conceptual development through problem solving. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Mathematical Sciences Education Board; the College Board’s Sciences Advisory Committee, SAT Committee, and Council on Academic Affairs; the Educational Testing Service’s Visiting Committee; the American Association of Physics Teacher’s Research in Physics Education Committee and of the editorial board of The Physics Teacher, and the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology’s Expert Panel. He earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

ANNEMARIE SULLIVAN PALINCSAR holds a chair in the University of Michigan’s School of Education, where she prepares teachers, teacher educators, and researchers to work in heterogeneous classrooms. She has conducted extensive research on peer collaboration in problem-solving activity, instruction to promote self-regulation, the development of literacy among learners with special needs, and the use of literacy across the school day. She is an editor of the books, Strategic Teaching and Learning and Teaching Reading as Thinking. Her cognition and instruction article on reciprocal teaching (co-authored with Ann Brown in 1984) is a classic. Dr. Palincsar currently serves on the National Research Council’s Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children. She received an early contribution award from the American Psychological Association in 1988 and one from the American Educational Research Association in 1991. In 1992 she was elected a fellow by the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in special education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

ROY D.PEA is director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, in Menlo Park, California, and consulting professor in the School of Education at Stanford University. He also directs the multi-institutional Center for Innovative Learning Technologies, which aims to create a national knowledge network for catalyzing best practices and new designs for improving learning with technologies among researchers, schools, and industries.. Previously, he was a John Evans professor of education and the learning sciences at Northwestern University, where he founded and chaired the learning sciences Ph.D. program and served as dean of the School of Education and Social Policy. He works as a cognitive scientist to integrate theory, research, and the design of effective learning environments using advanced technologies, with particular focus on science, mathematics, and technology. He has been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and is a fellow of the American Psychological Society. He received his doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Oxford, England, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 350
Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 351
Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 352
Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 353
Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 354
Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 355
Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 356
Suggested Citation:"Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9853.
×
Page 357
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How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition Get This Book
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning.

Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb.

How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system.

Topics include:

  • How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain.
  • How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn.
  • What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach.
  • The amazing learning potential of infants.
  • The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace.
  • Learning needs and opportunities for teachers.
  • A realistic look at the role of technology in education.
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