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Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes (2000)

Chapter: Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
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APPENDIX C

Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

DAVID TOLLERUD, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is professor of medicine and director of the Center for Environmental and Occupational Health at MCP Hahnemann University School of Public Health. He received his M.D. from Mayo Medical School and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. He served as a medical staff fellow in the Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute; pulmonary fellow at Brigham and Women's and Beth Israel Hospitals in Boston; assistant professor of medicine at the University of Cincinnati; and associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. He is a fellow of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and the American College of Chest Physicians, a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Thoracic Society, the American Association of Immunologists, the Clinical Immunology Society, the American Public Health Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the editorial review board of the American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal.

MICHAEL AMINOFF, M.D., is professor of neurology, director of the Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratories, and director of the Movement Disorders Clinic and the Epilepsy Program at the University of California Medical Center, San Francisco. He has published extensively on topics related to clinical neurol-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×

ogy and neurophysiology, has authored or edited 15 textbooks, is on the editorial board of several medical and scientific journals, and is editor of the journal Muscle and Nerve.

STEVEN GOODMAN, M.D., M.H.S., Ph.D., is an associate professor of oncology, pediatrics, epidemiology, and biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He trained in pediatrics at Washington University and received degrees in biostatistics and epidemiology in 1989 from Johns Hopkins University, where he is currently in the Oncology Center's Division of Biostatistics. As statistician for the Hopkins Oncology Center, General Clinical Research Center, and Pediatric Clinical Research Unit, he has participated in the design and analysis of a wide range of clinical and epidemiologic studies. He has served as statistical editor at the Annals of Internal Medicine since 1987 and has been on a variety of committees at the National Institutes of Health. His research interests include meta-analysis, statistical inference, the ethics of clinical trials, and the use of likelihood and bayesian methodology in clinical research.

ROBERT F. HERRICK, Sc.D., is a lecturer on industrial hygiene at the Harvard School of Public Health. His educational background includes a B.A. degree in chemistry from the College of Wooster, an M.S. in environmental health science from the University of Michigan, and a D.Sci. in industrial hygiene from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is certified in the comprehensive practice of industrial hygiene. His research interests are centered on the assessment of exposure as a cause of occupational and environmental disease. He has conducted research on the development of methods to measure the biologically active characteristics of reactive aerosols, and on studies of work processes in the construction and foundry industries to develop task-based models to identify and control the primary sources of worker exposures. Dr. Herrick is past chair of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, and past president of the International Occupational Hygiene Association. He is active in the association's mentor program, which facilitates training for occupational hygienists in industrializing countries. Prior to joining the faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health, Dr. Herrick spent 17 years at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, where he conducted occupational health research.

IRVA HERTZ-PICCIOTTO, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California at Berkeley. She is a member of several professional societies, including the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology, for which she hosted the 1994 Annual Meeting and currently serves as president-elect. She also serves on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Epidemiology, Epidemiology, and Human and Ecological Risk Assessment. She has published extensively on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×

several topic areas, including risk assessment, occupationally related cancer, environmental exposures, reproductive outcomes, and methods for epidemiologic data analysis. Her primary research interests are in the area of environmental chemical exposures and their effects on pregnancy, young children, and other susceptible populations. She has also been involved in the development of risk assessments using epidemiologic data, comparisons of reproductive toxicity and carcinogenic potency between animals and humans, and methodologic issues such as dose–response analysis and techniques for standardization.

DAVID G. HOEL, Ph.D., received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has more than 25 years of experience as a biostatistician, toxicologist, and environmental health researcher. Dr. Hoel currently holds the position of Distinguished University Professor and associate director of the Hollings Oncology Center at the Medical University of South Carolina. Before joining the Medical University of South Carolina, he held administrative positions at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, where he was most recently director of the Division of Biometry and Risk Assessment. Internationally, Dr. Hoel has been a member of the United States–Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program and also a member of numerous working groups of the International Agency for Research on Cancer of the World Health Organization.

ANDREW OLSHAN, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Washington. He was a postdoctoral fellow in medical genetics at the University of British Columbia from 1987 to 1989 and assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Family Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, from 1989 to 1991. He is a member of several professional societies, including the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the American Society of Human Genetics, and the Teratology Society. His major areas of interest include cancer and perinatal health in relation to environmental, occupational, and genetic factors. He has a particular interest in male-mediated effects on abnormal reproduction and development.

HOWARD OZER, M.D., Ph.D., is Eason Chair and chief of the Hematology/ Oncology Section, director of the Cancer Center, and professor of medicine at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Ozer is a member of several professional societies and has served on the Board of the Society for Biologic Therapy and the Governor's Cancer Advisory Board for the State of Georgia. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Cancer Biotherapy; Cancer Research, Therapy and Control; Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals; and Emedicine; he is a reviewer for numerous journals including Cancer Research, Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Ozer has published extensively on the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×

KENNETH S. RAMOS, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and vice-chairman of the faculty of toxicology at Texas A&M University. He also holds joint appointments in the Department of Medical Physiology and the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Texas A&M University Health Sciences Center. Dr. Ramos is a member of several professional societies including the Society of Toxicology, the Society for In Vitro Biology, the American Society for Cell Biology, and the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Biochemical Toxicology, Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Toxicology in Vitro, American Journal of Physiology, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Chemico-Biological Interactions, and Cell Biology and Toxicology. His primary research interests are in the area of cellular and molecular toxicology, with an emphasis on the study of chemically induced deregulation of gene expression, cell differentiation, and somatic growth control.

NOEL R. ROSE, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of pathology and of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins University and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Medicine and of Environmental Health Sciences. He is also director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Autoimmune Diseases and of the Johns Hopkins Reference Laboratory. Dr. Rose directs the university's training program in immunotoxicology and is active as a consultant in immunotoxicology. He has also served on panels of the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Center for Toxicological Research, the National Research Council, and other governmental agencies. He is past-president of the Clinical Immunology Society and editor-in-chief of the journal Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology. Dr. Rose's main area of research is autoimmune disease.

ARTHUR RUBENSTEIN, M.B.B.Ch., is dean of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and executive vice president of the Mount Sinai Center. Prior to this appointment, he was chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He is an authority on diabetes, a widely sought counselor to academic health centers, and a frequent panelist at the annual meetings of the senior research societies in internal medicine. He was a member of the National Institutes of Health Advisory Board and the National Diabetes Board, and he is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Residency Review Committee in Internal Medicine. Dr. Rubenstein has authored more than 350 papers, and has been on the editorial boards of Annals of Internal Medicine and the Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications, and Medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×

MICHAEL P. STERN, M.D., graduated Harvard College in 1959 and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1963. After completing his internship at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, he completed his residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in endocrinology and metabolism at Stanford University School of Medicine. He was a member of the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine in the Department of Medicine until 1976, when he joined the faculty of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, also in the Department of Medicine. His current position at that institution is professor of medicine and head of the Division of Clinical Epidemiology. He has performed extensive research on the epidemiology and genetics of diabetes, obesity, and related conditions, particular in Mexican Americans.

SUSAN WOSKIE, Ph.D., C.I.H., is associate professor in the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. She holds a doctoral degree in biomedical science (industrial hygiene) from Clark University and a master's in environmental health from the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research has focused on assessing exposures for epidemiologic studies, including exposure assessments in the metalworking and semiconductor industries. She has also studied diesel exhaust exposures among railroad and construction workers, lead exposures in bridge painting, and silica exposures in construction. Dr. Woskie currently serves on the editorial review board of the American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal and is a scientific adviser on the NIOSH/NCI Lung Cancer Mortality Study of Diesel Exposure in Non-Metal Mines.

STAFF BIOGRAPHIES

ROSE MARIE MARTINEZ, Sc.D., is director of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Prior to joining IOM, she was a senior health researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, where she conducted research on the impact of health system change on the public health infrastructure, access to care for vulnerable populations, manage care, and the health care workforce. Dr. Martinez is a former assistant director for health financing and policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office, where she directed evaluations and policy analysis in the area of national and public health issues. Dr. Martinez received her doctorate from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.

KATHLEEN STRATTON, Ph.D., was acting director of the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of IOM from 1997 to 1999. She received a B.A. degree in natural sciences from Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship in the neuropharmacology of phencyclidine compounds at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and in the neurophysiology of second-messenger

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×

systems at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, she joined the staff of the IOM in 1990. Dr. Stratton has worked on projects in environmental risk assessment, neurotoxicology, the organization of research and services in the Public Health Service, vaccine safety, fetal alcohol syndrome, and vaccine development. She has had primary responsibility for the reports Adverse Events Associated with Childhood Vaccines: Evidence Bearing on Causality; DPT Vaccine and Chronic Nervous System Dysfunction; Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Diagnosis, Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment; and Vaccines for the 21st Century: An Analytic Tool for Prioritization.

DAVID A. BUTLER, Ph.D., is a senior project officer in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering from the University of Rochester, and a Ph.D. in public policy analysis from Carnegie-Mellon University. Prior to joining IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and was a research associate in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is on the editorial advisory board of the journal Risk: Health, Safety and Environment. His research interests include exposure assessment and risk analysis.

JAMES A. BOWERS is a research assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He received his undergraduate degree in environmental studies from Binghamton University. He has also been involved with the IOM committees that produced Characterizing Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam, Adequacy of the Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program: Nerve Agents, and Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures.

JENNIFER A. COHEN is a research assistant in the Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. She received her undergraduate degree in art history from the University of Maryland. She has also been involved with the IOM committees that produced Organ Procurement and Transplantation and Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures.

SUSAN THAUL, Ph.D., is a senior program officer in the Medical Follow-up Agency of the Institute of Medicine. She received a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Columbia University and an M.S. in health policy and management from Harvard University. Dr. Thaul is the lead author of several IOM reports on veterans' health. She previously headed the health staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs. Prior to coming to the Institute she worked at the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, the Harlem Hospital Prevention of Prematurity Project, and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×
Page 61
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×
Page 62
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×
Page 63
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee and Staff Biographies." Institute of Medicine. 2000. Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/9982.
×
Page 66
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In response to the concerns voiced by Vietnam veterans and their families, Congress called upon the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to review the scientific evidence on the possible health effects of exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides. This call resulted in the creation of the first NAS Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides in 1992. The committee published its initial findings in the 1994 report Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam.

This report is the result of a 1999 request from the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) under the aegis of the Veterans and Agent Orange research program. Specifically, DVA asked the committee to examine evidence regarding the association, if any, between Type 2 diabetes and exposure to dioxin and other chemical compounds in herbicides used in Vietnam.

Veterans and Agent Orange: Herbicide/Dioxin Exposure and Type 2 Diabetes reviews the scientific evidence regarding the association, if any, between Type 2 diabetes1 and exposure to dioxin2 and other chemical compounds in herbicides used in Vietnam. This report examines, to the extent that available data permitted meaningful determinations, (1) whether a statistical association with herbicide exposure exists, taking into account the strength of the scientific evidence and the appropriateness of the statistical and epidemiologic methods used to detect the association; (2) the increased risk of the disease among those exposed to herbicides during Vietnam service; and (3) whether there is a plausible biological mechanism or other evidence of a causal relationship between herbicide exposure and the disease.

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